Ethics: Does it bother you when people are in nursing to make money? - page 17

I just wondered if others as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    We have 2 people who sign for valuables - it doesn't have to be 2 nurses though.

    steph
  2. by   James Huffman
    Quote from lamazeteacher
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    Well, I'd have partially agreed with you, were it not that the TV news came on as I opened this thread............. with a story from Virginia Beach, VA about a "nurse" who, it may be, took enough money from a dead patient's money clip, to take himself to "Best Buy", and purchased himself a laptop computer (no doubt to join the fun on this website:chuckle).

    It made me sick, to hear that the very nurse sat with the grieving widow, just before possibly profiting from the death of her husband (was all done that could be done to prevent his death?).

    The idea that so much money was available by the bedside, belies the admission process of putting valuables in safekeeping for patients - but that piece of trash called a "nurse", may have had to sign the form for it, so he wouldn't have done that! It seems that we'll now need 2 nurses to sign for valuables, just as narcotic counting requires.......at least it seems the culprit wasn't addicted to drugs............but wouldn't that latter disease be easier to live with than out and out thievery?:zzzzz
    What does this have to do with the discussion at hand? This is theft, pure and simple. Equating theft and nurses doing their best to make as much money as they can tells us something about the way some nurses think about this subject.
  3. by   BlueRidgeHomeRN
    [quote=lamazeteacher;2751666]_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    well, i'd have partially agreed with you, were it not that the tv news came on as i opened this thread............. with a story from virginia beach, va about a "nurse" who, it may be, took enough money from a dead patient's money clip, to take himself to "best buy", and purchased himself a laptop computer (quote]

    it will be interesting to follow this story and see if this really is a nurse--just working for the hospital proves nothing, and how often does the media get this wrong???
  4. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from James Huffman
    What does this have to do with the discussion at hand? This is theft, pure and simple. Equating theft and nurses doing their best to make as much money as they can tells us something about the way some nurses think about this subject.

    There are thieves in every category of career choices. Good point.

    This thread is so long I can't remember if I've posted prior to today.

    I have no problem if a person is "in nursing to make money" as long as they do their job well.

    steph
  5. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from James Huffman
    What does this have to do with the discussion at hand? This is theft, pure and simple. Equating theft and nurses doing their best to make as much money as they can tells us something about the way some nurses think about this subject.
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    There are thieves in every walk of life, unfortunately. Please, folks, don't take my message in the way it was above. Here are some of the ways I've seen inappropriate acts regarding money in our missions.

    IF the concept that anyone (not just nurses) has the right to consider the compensation aspect of a healthcare profession its main attraction, much is lost. We've all seen (at least I have) coworkers anticipating payday with the zeal of a child waiting for ice cream. Many routine aspects of our work have been neglected as the wait for that all important cheque shortens......

    I had the job as supervisor, the carrier and distributor of the weekly pay checks, and had to be at the appointed community center for that Home Health Agency's paycheck distribution, an hour before I was allowed to give them out (the payroll deposit wasn't made available until 4 PM). Most of the employees there to receive their checks were those who were the lowest paid, living "hand to mouth". There was no "automatic deposit", which usually happens the night before payday, after midnight. That could make the employer lose a day of interest the payroll funds made.....

    When I decided to utilize the hour (most people were there throughout the time), by teaching better charting methods, making a game of it with a "word of the week", which if spelled correctly and used appropriately in the following week's charts, would give the writer a point toward acquiring a membership at the well equipped community center. My boss took exception to the class, saying that "they can't learn". When they did, charting improved and was more about the patient than the caregiver, and the boss said accusingly, "Now they'll want more money!"

    Another example of inappropriate emphasis on money in the provision of healthcare occurred in 1986 during my 13 year old son's visit to his new physician. That doctor was making conversation by asking his new patient what he "wants to be, when you grow up". Much to my surprise, John replied in the lowest voice he could muster, "I've been thinking of medicine". The doctor reared back, and said seriously, "You don't want that! There's no money in it anymore".

    If I was another person, the little "devil" on one of my shoulders may have won over the "angel" on the other, and I would have socked the idiot! As we drove home with nothing physically wrong found during the examination, I tackled the impression made by the doctor we would never see again.

    I said, "John, be honest about your intentions when you choose your life's work, as you'll be doing it a long time. If money is your object, go into business where that goal is foremost". Well, he did one better, by becoming a stock broker and makes a huge income, although the stress he experiences daily is wearing on him and his mother.

    I say the same to others in healthcare, be sure your intentions in life match your goals.

    What can be lost when the focus on money is uppermost, is the satisfaction and appreciation of doing one's job well.
  6. by   James Huffman
    Quote from lamazeteacher
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    There are thieves in every walk of life, unfortunately. Please, folks, don't take my message in the way it was above. Here are some of the ways I've seen inappropriate acts regarding money in our missions.
    We can agree to disagree. But I just have to point out: I have a career, and my work. I don't have a mission. Honestly, I think it is presumptuous and dishonest to regard nursing as a "mission," any more than I would consider pharmaceutical manufacturing or hospital administration or physical therapy a "mission." We have a job to do. Let's do it.
  7. by   PeaceKeepr
    Most any career choice is "about the money" IF people are honest w/ themselves and others...Most people probably look for something they are remotely interested in, then look at the potential earnings, and then decide to go for it. I'd dare to say most MD's did it for the $$, as well as most engineers of anykind, celebrities, atheletes....no one is sitting around saying "oooo i love my minimum wage job" they are saying "man...if I just made X amount of money..."
  8. by   picurn10
    when I was young and single/childless I was a pre-nursing major. I was interested in it since the time I was about 9, it seemed like a perfect fit for me and my personality and giftings. However, I started to get cold feet when it came time to start the nursing course work. I wasn't sure it would be the best fit and had some reservations, I really enjoyed psychology so I switched my major with the plan of getting a graduate degree eventually.
    Well, then I got married and had a baby, and wound up divorced shortly afterward. The prospect of working on a master's or doctorate and then having just a few job choices made me nervous. Plus, being a single mom I've always looked for the situation that will give me the most time at home with my son, but still pays the bills.
    Now, nursing seems like the perfect fit. I won't lie: the job security/stability and pay are huge to me now. They weren't things I worried about when it was just myself. I know it's something I'm going to love, but honestly, I don't feel like I have the luxury to seek a career solely based on my enjoyment of it. I love the flexibility of options as far as specialties and educational advancement.
    If nursing paid, I don't know, what a secretary makes or something I can't say I'd be going this route. I think I'd be more passionate about being a child psychologist, but right now my son's needs are more important than my "passion" and before I know it, he'll be grown and I'll have time for those things if I still want to pursue it. For now, I'm going with the secure, well-paying, flexible option with a job I think I'll really enjoy.
  9. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from november551
    now ask yourself, if you hit the lotto, and had enough money to support yourself for the rest of your life doing anything you wanted to do. would you go back to work on some understaffed med/surg floor full time?
    no !!!
    i would like to do some type of volunteer work, like rocking
    preemies.

  10. by   Spidey's mom
    NO!

    I would simply do mission nursing - that is my passion.


    steph
  11. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from stevielynn
    NO!

    I would simply do mission nursing - that is my passion.


    steph

    Actually, a nurse at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Rosa, CA won a huge amount in the lottery there, about 10 years ago and continued to work nights in the nursery. She said she didn't want to let her co-workers down.......
  12. by   James Huffman
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    Actually, a nurse at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Rosa, CA won a huge amount in the lottery there, about 10 years ago and continued to work nights in the nursery. She said she didn't want to let her co-workers down.......
    I know I sound pretty strong on this, but actually, I'm a big fan of work. Work because it pays the bills. But also because work provides a source of meaning in our lives, and gives us a chance to honestly be of service to others, to love them in a concrete, visible way. I tell my kids that I'm not going to retire until I turn 100 and of course, I'm joking, but only half-way: lots of folks -- especially us guys -- die pretty soon after retiring, and I think it's because we've lost a major focus and drive in life.

    If I won the lottery (not possible because I don't play it :wink2 I suspect I'd do the same thing as this nurse does. My only complaint is that she manages to carry on the feeling that her co-workers "need" her. I'm sure they appreciate and value her, but I hope her patients need her more.

    I read another story a few weeks back. This British guy is 101, and he's getting ready to run a marathon. He went back to work 3 years ago because he was bored. Good for him!
  13. by   Agnus
    Quote from lamazeteacher
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    Well, I'd have partially agreed with you, were it not that the TV news came on as I opened this thread............. with a story from Virginia Beach, VA about a "nurse" who, it may be, took enough money from a dead patient's money clip, to take himself to "Best Buy", and purchased himself a laptop computer (no doubt to join the fun on this website:chuckle).
    You would have partially agreed except someone stole some money from a dead patient!? You lost me on that one. What does a thief have to do with anything I said? I don't like thieves either. You don't have to agree with me at all but please do not use this as your excuse. It implies some very nasty things I know you don't mean to imply.

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