Ethics: Does it bother you when people are in nursing to make money? - page 16

I just wondered if others as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at... Read More

  1. by   NurseyBaby'05
    I think the point that Dutch was trying to make is that Nursing is something you have to want to do. She wasn't saying that Glina would be a bad nurse. Just that if money was the only factor and she didn't want to do it at all, it would be very hard for her. Burnout is going to come a lot faster if it's just a paycheck she's after than to the people that want to be a nurse rather than hop on the hot-job bandwagon. Nursing is hard enough when it's what you want to do. I can't imagine how much harder it would be if I didn't. She will soon realize that for what nurses are expected to do, the money doesn't nearly begin to compensate us.

    Nurses aren't the only profession that is treated this way. Police officers, military personel, firefighters, paramedics and the like who are expected to put far more (thier lives and bodies) on the line compared to what they receive monetarily. (I know. I used to cash all of their paychecks at the bank before I was a nurse.)Society takes advantage of careers that people have a passion for.
  2. by   Agnus
    Quote from telerner
    [font=courier new]message from the op


    what gets me is that some folks entering this field are looking at nursing as a career choice for stability and yes the money, however not reasoning within their head that this job is very hard, takes stamina, requires one to endure mental fatigue and keep on going like the energizer bunny, requires one to be diplomatic at all costs and not lose one's cool, is not an easy money making career choice, none whatsoever cheesch!
    ok so this is the only job that requires this level of stamina, along with mental fatigue the requires you do to work like the bunnie and be diplomatic at all cost. sorry charlie too many of us come from other fields where that and more was very much the case. or we have family members from fields you would never in a blue moon consider because of the stress, risks, and just plain hard labor they involve.

    i am not discounting nursing demands. please do not discount demands of other jobs that you may or may not have ever considered. i work for money. i chose this profession sepcifically for money. i am technically excellent. i a provide compassionate care. my heart aches with my patient's. but i do it for the money.
  3. by   djc1981
    no offense to all you wonderful ladies, but the whole thing about "not doing nursing for the money" is such a girls point of view. of course people should care about money and demand as much as possible! men have been doing this for years, and it's the reason we consistently make more in just about every profession! i want to be a np, and i see being a rn as a stepping stone to do this -- and the new study out (advance, 2007) finds that female nps make 81k a year, while male nps make over 88k. this is not a coincidence. stand up for yourselves and demand what you deserve!!
  4. by   Agnus
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    We all need to be well compensated for what we do..

    I do get annoyed, however, When I read posts that basically say:

    "I want the money/flexability/status/job secuity that being a nurse brings, but I dont want to touch icky pts. I'm going to go right from school and go into mgmt. That way, I won't have to do icky stuff, and I'll be the boss of nurses who have far more knowledge and experience than I do. I'll be managing people who do all the things that I don't have a clue about. I'll get to be a nurse, without 'paying my dues', and without really having to be a nurse. Isn't that cool? Aren't I clever?"
    :angryfire:trout:
    First off I am a bedside nurse. I would prefer the person you describe to be in management. They do not belong at the bedside.

    Paying dues implies that it is less desirable than the management job. Is that where your prefer to be in management? I have no problem with that just be honest about it.

    You seem to resent management. Is it because you see their job as easier, more desirable and maybe better paying? Actually a lot of nurse managers are paid considerably LESS than the floor nurses.
  5. by   lainith
    Like many previous posters said... I choose health care because I felt like I had a need and a passion to care for people. I decided to go for my RN as opposed to another direction because of the flexibility, benefits, and salary. I decided to go this route because I want to be able to have a career with which I can not only support myself but hopefully a family some day.

    The only thing that burns me is to do my best and work as hard as I can, and get paid the same as someone who only does the bare minimum (or LESS in many cases) and could care less how hard they work. This isn't just a problem in nursing though - it plagues every profession!
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    I think the point that Dutch was trying to make is that Nursing is something you have to want to do. She wasn't saying that Glina would be a bad nurse. Just that if money was the only factor and she didn't want to do it at all, it would be very hard for her. Burnout is going to come a lot faster if it's just a paycheck she's after than to the people that want to be a nurse rather than hop on the hot-job bandwagon. Nursing is hard enough when it's what you want to do. I can't imagine how much harder it would be if I didn't. She will soon realize that for what nurses are expected to do, the money doesn't nearly begin to compensate us.
    :yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat:
  7. by   NurseyBaby'05
    We agree on something!

    :chrs:
  8. by   november17
    THIS is an example of someone that loves their job and doesn't do it for the money.
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/topstor...9520-20361956/
    Now ask yourself, if you hit the lotto, and had enough money to support yourself for the rest of your life doing ANYTHING you wanted to do. Would you go back to work on some understaffed med/surg floor full time?
  9. by   BlueRidgeHomeRN
    Quote from agnus
    oh my gosh. here we go again. so tell me are you doing it purely out of love? do you mean you do not need the income and either do not accept it or turn it over to charity? come one get real.

    i do it for a living. that does not make be a bad nurse. it does not mean i do not have compassion or passion for what i do.

    did you ever hear about maslow's hiarach of needs? you must meet the bast needs first. so yes i put income and security ahead of fulfillment.

    i used to joke that i worked full time because my kids were spoiled rotten--the little brats wanted to sleep inside and eat three times a day!!

    please, don't play this holier than though cra22. i have been around this world much too long. i understand full well idealism but i also know you can not eat idealism, you can not wear idealism, you can not get out of the rain using it, and your question makes no more sense than the person in the following joke.

    man in flood. he refuses to get on evacuation bus because he knows god will save him. water gets higher boat comes to rescue him. still he prefers to wait for god. healicoptor comes and he rejects this help as well as he has firm faith that god will rescue him. finally he drowns. he ask god why he let him drown. god says i sent you a bus, a boat and a heilocoptor what else do you expect.

    i know this joke is off the subject. however, it demonstrates some of the inane thought processes people have that are totally lacking in sense. the guy in this story made no sense just as the original question makes no sense.
    love the post--"what do you call two boats and a helicopter" is shorthand in our family for someone avoiding the obvious!!:bowingpur
  10. by   SDS_RN
    Just had a moral boosting conference for work yest and the speaker said if every job offered only x amt of dollars what would you be doing? If your answer is not what you are doing now then it's time to rekindle your passion or get out. You need to be passionate about what you do and not focus on the money factor becasue the money will find you. I though that was very true.
    I love what I do and could not imagine doing anything else. For those in this for just a paycheck it's too bad because then you don't experience the fullness of your profession and what you are doing for others.
  11. by   James Huffman
    Quote from ER_baby12
    Just had a moral boosting conference for work yest and the speaker said if every job offered only x amt of dollars what would you be doing? If your answer is not what you are doing now then it's time to rekindle your passion or get out. You need to be passionate about what you do and not focus on the money factor becasue the money will find you. I though that was very true.
    I love what I do and could not imagine doing anything else. For those in this for just a paycheck it's too bad because then you don't experience the fullness of your profession and what you are doing for others.
    I'm sorry to break this, but all jobs don't pay x amount of dollars. And part of the whole process of doing our work is knowing what pays, and what doesn't, and I would virtually guarantee that almost all those at this morale boosting conference were women. Because -- as an earlier poster pointed out -- men almost always think in terms of money. Not that it's the only thing. We look for what we enjoy, for what works for our families, for growth, but men almost never pretend that we are angels of mercy sent by God to sooth the fevered brow. Please. I believe the money will find you, too. I also believe in finding the money.

    I want nurses to find niche areas where they can be good, where they can grow, and where they can make a lot of money. If you do that, you'll be a better nurse, and you'll serve your patients better, PLUS ... you'll make more money. Don't kid yourself: a nurse who's making a lot of money is doing so because that nurse has found a way to serve patients better.

    Lots of women feel guilty about saying they want to make money. And employers can smell that guilt a block away, and will milk it for what it's worth. If you don't want to make money, you won't. Guaranteed.
  12. by   SDS_RN
    Quote from James Huffman
    I'm sorry to break this, but all jobs don't pay x amount of dollars. And part of the whole process of doing our work is knowing what pays, and what doesn't, and I would virtually guarantee that almost all those at this morale boosting conference were women. Because -- as an earlier poster pointed out -- men almost always think in terms of money. Not that it's the only thing. We look for what we enjoy, for what works for our families, for growth, but men almost never pretend that we are angels of mercy sent by God to sooth the fevered brow. Please. I believe the money will find you, too. I also believe in finding the money.

    I want nurses to find niche areas where they can be good, where they can grow, and where they can make a lot of money. If you do that, you'll be a better nurse, and you'll serve your patients better, PLUS ... you'll make more money. Don't kid yourself: a nurse who's making a lot of money is doing so because that nurse has found a way to serve patients better.

    Lots of women feel guilty about saying they want to make money. And employers can smell that guilt a block away, and will milk it for what it's worth. If you don't want to make money, you won't. Guaranteed.
    I understand your point but I was trying to imply that you can have both love for your job and good pay to back it up. I know that all jobs don't pay x amt of $$ but the point was about finding a profession you love. If you are unhappy w/ your job then what are you gaining from it? Money is not everything, it helps, but there are more important aspects to being a nurse than just the $$. I also don't believe that women are afraid or feel guilty about wanting to make $$ otherwise there would not be as many of in the workplace that there is. As women we have to fight harder to make good $$ and most of the women including myself do work hard and also want to make a good living. I think as nurses we are always continuing to grow and learning how to better provide for our patients but money is not the #1 driving force behind that. I appreciate your opinion and maybe my thoughts from my OP did not come across how I intended them to but I'll agree to disagree w/ you.
  13. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from Agnus
    Oh my gosh. Here we go again. So tell me are you doing it purely out of love? Do you mean you do not need the income and either do not accept it or turn it over to charity? Come one get real.

    I do it for a living. That does not make be a bad nurse. It does not mean I do not have compassion or passion for what I do.

    Did you ever hear about Maslow's hiarach of needs? You MUST meet the bast needs first. So YES I put income and security ahead of fulfillment.

    Please, don't play this holier than though cra22. I have been around this world much too long. I understand full well idealism but I also know you can not eat idealism, you can not wear idealism, you can not get out of the rain using it, and your question makes no more sense than the person in the following joke.

    Man in flood. he refuses to get on evacuation bus because he knows God will save him. Water gets higher boat comes to rescue him. Still he prefers to wait for God. Healicoptor comes and he rejects this help as well as he has firm faith that God will rescue him. Finally he drowns. He ask God why He let him drown. God says I sent you a bus, a boat and a heilocoptor what else do you expect.

    I know this joke is off the subject. However, it demonstrates some of the inane thought processes people have that are totally lacking in sense. The guy in this story made no sense just as the original question makes no sense.
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    Well, I'd have partially agreed with you, were it not that the TV news came on as I opened this thread............. with a story from Virginia Beach, VA about a "nurse" who, it may be, took enough money from a dead patient's money clip, to take himself to "Best Buy", and purchased himself a laptop computer (no doubt to join the fun on this website:chuckle).

    It made me sick, to hear that the very nurse sat with the grieving widow, just before possibly profiting from the death of her husband (was all done that could be done to prevent his death?).

    The idea that so much money was available by the bedside, belies the admission process of putting valuables in safekeeping for patients - but that piece of trash called a "nurse", may have had to sign the form for it, so he wouldn't have done that! It seems that we'll now need 2 nurses to sign for valuables, just as narcotic counting requires.......at least it seems the culprit wasn't addicted to drugs............but wouldn't that latter disease be easier to live with than out and out thievery?:zzzzz

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