Ethics: Does it bother you when people are in nursing to make money? - page 10

I just wondered if others as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at... Read More

  1. by   marilynmom
    Man, nursing is hard ass work. If it didn't pay decent there is no way I would do it.

    Nursing is a JOB, it is not some special mystical calling--that makes me so sick when I hear that actually. I work and I expect to get paid. I didn't go to college and take out student loans, etc to not want some money in return.

    So, ya I'm IN nursing "for the money"....I'm not working for free! If I wasn't getting paid I wouldn't do it.
  2. by   RNsRWe
    Guess I'll have to throw my two cents in, as everyone else already has

    I would not be in nursing if it weren't for the paycheck. I can certainly think of far easier ways to earn money, but not as MUCH money, as I do now. If I truly felt this job were a calling, then perhaps I'd be less interested in how much it paid. But frankly, I don't know too many nurses who aren't counting out the bucks from each paycheck and making sure it matches every minute they were on the floor!

    I went into nursing because I felt I'd be good at it, because it DID satisfy my desire as a do-gooder (having helped people really IS a good way to end your week), and because the paycheck and benefits would allow me to do all the things I REALLY want to do, on my time off.

    I think those who swear that the only people who should be in nursing are those who have slave-complexes, or are wanna-be nuns, should reconsider why they feel this way. Seriously. Deep psych reflections. Because if you think nurses should not expect premium pay for premium work when OTHER professions do, you really have to wonder why.
  3. by   Virgo_RN
    I personally don't care what a person's motivations are for being a nurse. What I care about is how they do their job. If they're a good nurse, who cares what their motivations are?
  4. by   RNsRWe
    You know, I was scanning down the list of topics, and read the title of this thread again. And it made me think of a fast response: "does it bother you when people are in medical school to make money?". How about "Does it bother you when people are in dental school to make money?".

    Probably already been mentioned before, but still....
  5. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from TeleRNer
    Ok OK you have a very good point EG! We earn what we justly deserve in salary; some of us think otherwise...that MDs earn exponentially more than us and that's just not fair.
    Does it bother you when someone comes to work, sits on there ass, complains about patient's in an unprofessional manner, gripes about pay, appears to have more interests in how well the Starbucks stock is doing than doing the tasks, the nursing process at hand or being even an inkling of the best nurse that they can be?
    I don't want to get in the whole doctors vs. nurses...just wanted to say that there training alone is probably triple what a RN requires (BSN prepared).

    Yes, it is bothersome...but I must say that the majority of the nurses I've worked with are constantly on the go.

    I am going into nursing because of my interest in medicine and being an advocate for my patients...but, I'm also doing it because I know that it is a career that will provide me with a good living and hopefully a good retirement.

    Kris
  6. by   banditrn
    Quote from multicollinearity
    This thread reminds me of studies that have been done on cognitive dissonance and careers.

    You know - the studies go something like this: 20 participants are paid $5 to do a boring and unpleasant task (rated boring and unpleasant by overwhelming margins in other samples) and then they fill out a survey regarding the meaning and level of enjoyment. 20 other participants do the exact same task, but they are paid $50, and then they fill out the same survey regarding the boring/unpleasant task.

    Who rates their boring/unpleasant level most accurately? The higher paid group. This has been duplicated many, many times. It is cognitive dissonance regarding work. The lower paid group will always rank their task as quite meaningful, etc. The mind has to inject the perception of extra meaning to explain why we would do such things for low pay/bad treatment.

    When people are paid fairly and treated well, they tend to perceive their conditions more accurately.

    I would think this could have implications for nursing. Anytime I hear nursing related as a 'calling' by someone I think of this. Savvy and scheming leaders know that the way to get someone to work harder for them is to treat them poorly and pay them little. The worker will respond with cognitive dissonance and unconsciously attach extra meaning to their work to bridge the dissonance and work harder.

    Many people leading large groups know this. Religious leaders know this, and so do political leaders, etc. I think of this sometimes when I read about nursing being a 'calling' and all of the halo 'angels of mercy' stuff.

    Double post, sorry.
    Last edit by banditrn on Nov 30, '07
  7. by   banditrn
    Quote from multicollinearity
    This thread reminds me of studies that have been done on cognitive dissonance and careers.

    You know - the studies go something like this: 20 participants are paid $5 to do a boring and unpleasant task (rated boring and unpleasant by overwhelming margins in other samples) and then they fill out a survey regarding the meaning and level of enjoyment. 20 other participants do the exact same task, but they are paid $50, and then they fill out the same survey regarding the boring/unpleasant task.

    Who rates their boring/unpleasant level most accurately? The higher paid group. This has been duplicated many, many times. It is cognitive dissonance regarding work. The lower paid group will always rank their task as quite meaningful, etc. The mind has to inject the perception of extra meaning to explain why we would do such things for low pay/bad treatment.

    When people are paid fairly and treated well, they tend to perceive their conditions more accurately.

    I would think this could have implications for nursing. Anytime I hear nursing related as a 'calling' by someone I think of this. Savvy and scheming leaders know that the way to get someone to work harder for them is to treat them poorly and pay them little. The worker will respond with cognitive dissonance and unconsciously attach extra meaning to their work to bridge the dissonance and work harder.

    Many people leading large groups know this. Religious leaders know this, and so do political leaders, etc. I think of this sometimes when I read about nursing being a 'calling' and all of the halo 'angels of mercy' stuff.
    That IS very interesting. I've worked with people over the years that almost seemed as tho they ENJOYED being mistreated. I don't care for those types, and can't understand what they get from it. Especially the ones that want to run to you and complain, yet they will do nothing but take it some more.

    After listening to them the first time or two, then I tell them to either do something about it or stop bringing it up.
  8. by   jtski908
    I was a fire fighter medic in the USAF and the whole, "service before self" issue was pushed ad nauseum.

    The poster was correct that the lower paying jobs that require the most personal sacrifice seem to have a type of super significance attached to the service (I guess so people will do those jobs).

    Here's one: I have been a police officer for almost 20 years (I am about to retire and start a second career as an RN-gladly so, I might add).

    Over the years, I have watched as person after person have paid officers/firefighters/medics etc, VERBAL compliment after compliment. BUT, when it comes time to pony up for more cops or ffers or medics for better pay, or better pension, or to make these types of jobs safer, or to address the issue of retention, or hiring better qualified people, nothing but excuses and lies.<-I won't go into them, I'm sure most of the veteran nurses have heard them before....

    To the nurses: be glad the majority of nurses do not work in a city or state type setting.

    When I leave my "popo" job, and finish my RN program, I will start out my first year as an RN, higher than I topped out as as a police officer.

    I am going into nursing because the money is good (esp coupled with my pension). But, I am not doing completely for the money. I like to help people. I like to make a difference (small or large as that may be).

    BUT, I also like the fact I'll have more money to take care of my wife and our 3 and a half month old son (who is starting to smile at daddy every time he sees daddy)
    Last edit by jtski908 on Nov 30, '07
  9. by   showbizrn
    JUST FOR THE MONEY with safe, ethical nursing practice doesn't bother me.

    My interest is patient safety.

    Any other concern is none of my business...people enter professions for their own reasons.

    Leave well enough alone.
  10. by   EmmaG
    "If nurses weren't supposed to have knowledge, they were supposed to have virtues. Lots of them, in fact: 'In the economy of nature,' the Lancet explained, 'the ministry of women is one of help and sympathy. The essential principle, the key-note of her work in the world is aid; to sustain, succour, revive, and even sometimes shelter, man in the struggle and duty of life, is her peculiar function.'

    Women were supposed to be 'efficient providers of care,' who pursued 'higher incentives to activity, zeal, and faithfulness than the mere earning of wages.' The French reformer Bourneville extolled [nurses] training schools that taught moral refinement and 'feminine tenderness of spirit' and that 'furnish personnel with the same guarantees (as religious orders) of aptitude and devotion.'

    What better way to obtain cheap labor than to instill in nurses the view that they should sacrifice their material needs to a higher mission or calling?" --- Suzanne Gordon, Nursing Against the Odds

    'nuf said...
  11. by   wooh
    What better way to obtain cheap labor than to instill in nurses the view that they should sacrifice their material needs to a higher mission or calling?" --- Suzanne Gordon, Nursing Against the Odds
    Not just cheap labor. But the whole "virtuous calling" is what allows our "customers" to treat us like crap without repercussions. After all, they're sick and if we were good virtuous nurses we'd understand that instead of demanding respect.
  12. by   EmmaG
    Quote from wooh
    Not just cheap labor. But the whole "virtuous calling" is what allows our "customers" to treat us like crap without repercussions. After all, they're sick and if we were good virtuous nurses we'd understand that instead of demanding respect.
    Oooo, good point. Not only our "customers", but doctors, administration, families and the public in general...
  13. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Oooo, good point. Not only our "customers", but doctors, administration, families and the public in general...
    and ooooooooooh, the look in their eyes, when they see what b*tches we can be...
    take THAT, dagnabit!!

    leslie

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