Emergency Transport Rn

  1. I AM AN EMT AND A SKI PATROLLER AND LOVE EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES AND BIENG ABLE TO RUN UNDER PROTOCOLS AND GUIDELINES. i REALIZE IT WILL TAKE ALOT OF EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING BUT I WAS WONDERING WHAT JOBS BESIDE LIFE FLIGHT ARE AVAILABLE FOR NURSES ALONG THE LINES OF EMERGENCY TRANSPORT.
    AND WHERE ARE THEY LOCATED AND ARE THEY FREQUENTLY AVAILABLE.
    THANKS
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   FlyingScot
    There are three modes of transport. Fixed wing (plane), rotor wing (heli) and MICU (mobile intensive care unit-ambulance). Critical Care Transport RN's work in all three types. Some just do one mode others may be on a team that uses a combination of all of them. They can be hospital based or a private company. You will find transport services in all states and some cities (actually a lot of cities) have multiple companies providing the service. It used to be very difficult to get into but it seems lately there are plenty of jobs available. You will, however, need a great deal of experience. Most reputable companies require 3-5 years of ICU/ER experience, knowledge of special equipment, and multiple certifications. For the most part the pay is no better than regular nurses pay which is to say...not much. The reward is strictly in the job. Another option for you may be what is called a PHRN (pre-hospsital registered nurse). There are only a few states that have this but it allows you to work for a fire department or ambulance service in the role but not the title of paramedic. Hope this helps.
  4. by   bopps
    All of the above and
    All are very competitive positions
    all require you to have a minimum of 2-5 years of in hospital ICU or ER nursing experience. And all want you to be a team player. I've researched this quite a bit cause its my career goal. Good luck!
  5. by   emtb2rn
    "Summit to Sam. Stop yelling into your radio. Next time's a beer violation and 2 hours of wreck sit."


    Seriously, all caps is the online equivalent of shouting.
  6. by   Medic/Nurse
    FlyinScot got the berries on this one.

    Transport RN's do work CCT Ground, Rotor EMS (HEMS) and Fixed Wing Air Transport.

    Most generally do require a min. of 3 years high acuity ED/ICU and any number of additional "qualifications".

    At a minimum these qualifications:

    * ACLS, PALS, NRP
    * TNCC, TNATC and PHTLS
    * Speciality exp in IABP, Art Lines, Vent Management, LVADS, ECMO, High Risk OB/Neo, Hemo Monitoring.
    * Add speciality board certification in Emergency (CEN) and Critical Care (CCRN)
    * Some demand EMT Basic or Paramedic too
    * Within 12-24 months after starting most require CFRN or CTRN (www.ena.org)


    There are jobs out there in most areas of the country. Most are VERY competitive. But, IMHO it is the best RN job in the world.

    I have 13 years as a medic and 4 1/2 as an RN. I've been working at this for a year. I was qualified, but I was a bit LUCKY too. I remain very grateful.

    Work HARD.
    Be HUMBLE.
    Practice SAFE.
  7. by   SaderNurse05
    Quote from FlyingScot
    There are three modes of transport. Fixed wing (plane), rotor wing (heli) and MICU (mobile intensive care unit-ambulance). Critical Care Transport RN's work in all three types. Some just do one mode others may be on a team that uses a combination of all of them. They can be hospital based or a private company. You will find transport services in all states and some cities (actually a lot of cities) have multiple companies providing the service. It used to be very difficult to get into but it seems lately there are plenty of jobs available. You will, however, need a great deal of experience. Most reputable companies require 3-5 years of ICU/ER experience, knowledge of special equipment, and multiple certifications. For the most part the pay is no better than regular nurses pay which is to say...not much. The reward is strictly in the job. Another option for you may be what is called a PHRN (pre-hospsital registered nurse). There are only a few states that have this but it allows you to work for a fire department or ambulance service in the role but not the title of paramedic. Hope this helps.
    Do you know if Texas or Oklahoma have PHRNs?
  8. by   vamedic4
    Texas does not have PHRNs...

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