Eeekk!!Patients sexual needs???!!! - page 5

Hi,Im pretty new to all of this so PLEASE help me if you can.Im getting ready to take my exam to be a cna so I can be working while attending nursing school this Fall.I was browsing through my... Read More

  1. by   freelancer
    i am as much surprised as you are when i red your post kimburlynn... But hear something from me. I'm just a nursing student, so just like you, i may not have all the knowledge in dealing with patients of extreme sexual needs. But, if my memory serves me right, Nursing students were taught of communication technique during health care 1. Review it...

    You are not going to fulfill their sexual needs because your license will be revoked. Under the code of ethics, Med. Prof. should not get emotionally attached to their patients. What more, if physical attachment? Instead, what you can do is to distract the focus of your patient from his/her sexual urge... How? that's your assignment... I want to hear from yhou soon
  2. by   nycegyrl
    Quote from kimburlynn
    Hi,Im pretty new to all of this so PLEASE help me if you can.Im getting ready to take my exam to be a cna so I can be working while attending nursing school this Fall.I was browsing through my workbook this weekend and found a section asking me how I can help patients fulfill their sexual needs .Needless to say I was shocked:imbar .I want to be a nurse but not a sex therapist.I will be working in a nursing home this summer/fall and the mental images this dredged up were not pretty.Also there was a section on preparing a dead body although this suprised me I know I could handle it if I had to but the before mentioned sex thing :uhoh21: Yikes!!!!!
    A CNA should contact her charge nurse and the charge nurse should let the Director or Nursing know. Then all of the CNA's should be made aware of the situation and how the LTC wants to handle it or how they want the CNA's to handle it. Better to error on the safe side.
  3. by   blessedwoman
    How could anyone in their right mind, who is even thinking of entering the medical field, be so quemish about pt. sexual needs. Even though they are in a medical facility, they are still human with needs. Maybe you should look for another career, honey!!!
  4. by   susanna
    Quote from blessedwoman
    How could anyone in their right mind, who is even thinking of entering the medical field, be so quemish about pt. sexual needs. Even though they are in a medical facility, they are still human with needs. Maybe you should look for another career, honey!!!
    Nah, everyone has been squeamish about a lot of things about other human beings' behaviors in their lifetime. Besides, not everyone has the same physiology and can undertsand completely other human beings' physiological needs.

    Classic example: For instance, if I have terrible migraines and if Uve never had a migraine in your whole life, youll be wondering why the heck I'm screaming so loudly and complaining all the time. You're human and you understand I'm human but you don't understand how a migraine feels yourself or just how important it is to treat it or what to treat it with unitl someone tells you how.

    Its the same with all physiological needs. You dont have to experience them yourself in order to handle them properly. I think its okay to be squeamish and still go into the medical field. My two cents.
  5. by   blessedwoman
    this is in reply to Susanna,

    If this Cna is thinking about getting into nursing, she should be aware that although some people can adapt to things better than others, there are just some things that a nurse HAS to come to grips with in his/her career. There is just no way around it. How could she be queemish about this when she has sexual needs herself (I guess) :uhoh21:

    Anyway girl, if she keeps a positive attitude, some things will get easier for her and everything will eventually be alright.

    Stay cool!! We all have had to adjust.
  6. by   susanna
    Blessed woman,
    I agree that everyone has to learn how to deal with matters in a respectful and acceptable manner. Everyone has to come to grips with how to deal with other people and ALL of their aspects/needs in this field.

    I was writing in disagreement because I assumed you were implying that if someone has a personal problem about how they feel about someone else's sexual behavior, they should seriously consider choosing another field. That, I thought, would be too harsh and undermining the principle that everyone is different and gets uncomfortable/squeamish with different things. But it was wrong of me to assume you were saying that. Sorry for reading in to your words too much. Its a bad habit that I keep trying to break.
  7. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Quote from susanna
    i had a question pertaining to this on my CNA exam, to which I still do not know the right answer:

    In a nursing home, you have found out that Mrs. X and Mr. Y, both residents who met in the LTC facility, are having a sexual relationship. You...

    A) Try to keep Mrs. X and Mr. Y in different activities and in different groups as much as possible.

    B) Inform the patients' families of this. They are paying for the stay and are thus legallly responsible.

    C) Understand that it is very important that older persons are sociable and make new friends and give them their privacy.

    And, I think the last one was,

    D) Tell your nursing supervisor immediately before anything else happens.
    C!!!!!!!!!! They're both consenting adults. One question as a care giver to take into consideration though "Is someone being coerced?", but that was not one of your choices. As for B: How do you know who is paying for their stay? It's often the elderly person him or herself.
  8. by   Chad_KY_SRNA
    But this is a CNA test question. The answer has to be D. If these people have developed a new sexual relationship in a SNF they are allowed to do that as long as they are both able to consent. The nurses I work with would drop dead on the spot if I, a CNA, allowed them to have sex and didn't tell the nurse. I would shut the door and go to the unit nurse STAT and let her deal with determining if they are consenting adults or if it is a rape in progress. At my facility we may even have them see psych to determine this. Definately D.
    Last edit by Chad_KY_SRNA on Jun 22, '04
  9. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I would hope that you would have taught your daughter to behave better than that. If you didn't, someone should be reprimanding YOU or HER, not the nurse.

    I have dealt with enough pregnant 14 year olds whose parents encourage "Daddy" staying with them to find that I can't enforce mine or society's morals on them. If their parents haven't managed to do so, it ain't gonna happen. And to expect nurses to do enforce some (unknown to them) moral code that you have daughter is ridiculous.
    This isn't really about morality, let's try legality... My point is that my child would be a minor, my child would be medically compromised... perhaps my child would not even be consenting to this illegal act... For a nurse to make an assumption, smile, exit, and put a "Do not Disturb" sign on the door of this MINOR is absurd! Bottom line, the nurses are expected to look out for the welfare of the minors in their care... Not addressing this situation is certainly not looking out for the welfare of this minor...
  10. by   Rick-Wood
    Yup. Definitely D.

    I forgot that the privacy we have to protect stops when activity involves the stuff between the navel and the knees. We even have to get psych approval sometimes. Tell me, when does sex become deviant? At what age is sexual intimacy a psychiatric abnormality? I wanna know, because according to my AARP membership and the numerous Senior Citizen discounts I get already I'm an oldster.

    As a matter of fact, I've taken care of people in home care as well as in assisted living and 'convalescent hospitals' who were younger than my contemporaries' kids. So I'd like to have it clarified so I know at what age to start avoiding your folks' generation of caregivers, especially if I need any kind of LTC downstream. You see, I'm already past the age in which those kinds of freedoms and privacy are being curtailed in many places by people who "know better" what is good for others and what is not.

    Of course assaults need to be reported. But we are charged with respecting privacy, and I wonder just where we suddenly get off thinking we can barge in while someone is sexually intimate with a consenting and participating 'other' when we are prohibited from entering without knocking if the patient is lying in bed reading a newspaper. How do we Know what is happening unless we can ask and evaluate the answer?

    I know that it's "common knowlege" that CNAs do not have the competency to make these determinations. I'm not sure that LVNs or RNs are all that competent on the subject either. I doubt there are many of us, CNA through DON, who would want to submit to a psychiatric or psychological examination for the purpose of having a bit of 'nookie' with someone who wants to have 'nookie' with us too, just because of where we are living at the time. Why then would we ask people of a certain age and living location to submit to that kind of exam, if residence location is the only criteria which determines whether an exam is called for or not?

    Of course we need to serve safety, but at what cost? What exactly is this thing we call 'quality of life' and where does it fit into lives, both residents' and our own? It is a thorny problem, indeed.
  11. by   Diamond Nurse
    walked into a cubicle after announcing myself (abit too quickly) and caught the guys girlfriend pulling her head out from under the covers. S :hatparty: he meekly looked at me as she wiped her mouth and smiled. I always wait a few seconds longer now before whipping open those curtains.
  12. by   Moscow
    Quote from kimburlynn
    Hi,Im pretty new to all of this so PLEASE help me if you can.Im getting ready to take my exam to be a cna so I can be working while attending nursing school this Fall.I was browsing through my workbook this weekend and found a section asking me how I can help patients fulfill their sexual needs .Needless to say I was shocked:imbar .I want to be a nurse but not a sex therapist.I will be working in a nursing home this summer/fall and the mental images this dredged up were not pretty.Also there was a section on preparing a dead body although this suprised me I know I could handle it if I had to but the before mentioned sex thing :uhoh21: Yikes!!!!!
    Legal consent issues are to the fore. Sexual assault and abuse are quite common relative to all large institutional models. That might include just about any range and type of actor from other patients to other staff. In a small clinic or smaller hospital setting the risks will be less.

    The religious have lead the way in giving us the statistical reportage for how bad it can get if the risk management is based on routinely ignoring adverse phenomena. The religious hierarchy were caught doing something which mental hospitals etc. were also doing.

    Institutional sex generally tends to masturbation across all formats. A hospital is not supposed to be a public sex arena. People can be very untidy and pretending not to see is as important as making sure one reports events of interest to management, police, relatives, coroner etc.
  13. by   Moscow
    Quote from Chad_KY_SRNA
    But this is a CNA test question. The answer has to be D. If these people have developed a new sexual relationship in a SNF they are allowed to do that as long as they are both able to consent. The nurses I work with would drop dead on the spot if I, a CNA, allowed them to have sex and didn't tell the nurse. I would shut the door and go to the unit nurse STAT and let her deal with determining if they are consenting adults or if it is a rape in progress. At my facility we may even have them see psych to determine this. Definately D.
    A rape in progress might require something rather more urgent. The police do not usually (officially) delegate their powers of arrest and investigation etc. If somebody has climbed through the window with a knife then the police and hospital security should be first on the list.

    Generally speaking if a rape in progress is suspected, the police will usually be most indignant if the suspected evolves to being a historic sex crime issue and that they were only told about it two months later. The police generally like to be viewed as being completely blameless.

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