east coast nursing vs. the others

  1. I was just on another blackboard and read were several nurses had said they were not happy when they worked on the east coast and saw a 360 degree difference working in other places such as California, Vegas, Texas, etc... Has anyone else had the same experience? Please explain to me what kind of differences you found?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    huh? (west coast nurse who does not know the HELL you are saying here).
  4. by   Pretzlgl
    Nope. From Pa live in Ut. Big difference is pay is worse here. Not much else. Oh and 360 degree difference would be back to the starting point. 180 degree difference is actually a change...
  5. by   szccdw
    well i guess they must have had one of a kind experiences. No one else seems to have have the same type of experience. Thanks for pointing out that 360 degrees would bring them back to the same thing. I didn't even think about that.
  6. by   mario_ragucci
    I can only imagine working "home." I have only worked as a cna in Portland Oregon, and plan to stay here for several years after I become an RN ust so I can burn a few years worth of great experience.

    Working in New York City is like a dream. Everyone know's I'm from NYC now, even though I haven't lived home since 1983.

    I know the east coast nurses would be different as the environmnet is different. Perhaps easterners say and do more in less time. That would be so exciting, to be a RN med-surg in NYC hospital. Cultural maturity.
  7. by   Stargazer
    When I was still working at the bedside in ICU, a number of our residents--and a few transplanted nurses--told me that nurses not on the East Coast in general, but specifically many hospitals in New England, were not allowed to do many procedures which West Coast nurses took for granted: shooting cardiac outputs, starting IV's, drawing ABG's, giving many IV push medications.

    Of course, the reporting was anecdotal, and this was at least 8 years ago, so I can't vouch for the accuracy then or now. I'd be curious to hear New England nurses weigh in.
  8. by   2banurse
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    I can only imagine working "home." I have only worked as a cna in Portland Oregon, and plan to stay here for several years after I become an RN ust so I can burn a few years worth of great experience.

    Working in New York City is like a dream. Everyone know's I'm from NYC now, even though I haven't lived home since 1983.

    I know the east coast nurses would be different as the environmnet is different. Perhaps easterners say and do more in less time. That would be so exciting, to be a RN med-surg in NYC hospital. Cultural maturity.
    I totally agree. I miss NY like crazy, and as much as FLA is nice during the winter and for vacation, I miss the energy of NYC. It is especially hard during the holidays...

    I also like to follow -jt's posts...getting some news from home.

    Kris
  9. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    I have worked East Coast, South and Mid west and so far the place I was blown away with, with thier layed back ways of doing things was California. No one was in too much of a hurry for anything. Not saying we didnt bust humps there it just wasnt a big thing to them. The pay in West Coast is more than East or South and Mid west but You cant beat the things to do and see on the East Coast. But overall anything beats making $14 hr in Alabama lol, for non stop understaffed and Mangers so far up your behind they tell you how your Colon looked.
    Zoe
  10. by   New CCU RN
    While I didnt start doing ICU until I moved down south, I grew up in New England..... sorry but the majority of conditions there are not so bad...so I beg to differ.... in my own personal opinion... the pay was better there and the staffing was better as well. I took a 7 dollar pay cut coming down to the south. Granted cost of living is lower, but still....that is a large amount of money.

    As far as not being able to do procedures, etc, I do know that (I was in OB), nurses didnt do vag exams but this was bc I was at a teaching institution and they wanted the interns and residents to get the experience..... other than that.... from what I know and saw..... the same amount of practice is done down here in the south as up there in new england...... If there was one example of this..maybe it was just the p/p of the hospital...not the region in general....
  11. by   baseline
    I have been in Tx, Az,Fla and NYS. Never saw much difference that I could relate to an entire state or region. I know that at the hospital I worked at in NY, we did alot of things that the nurses in the hospital up the street were not allowed to do....

    Too big a question to narrow down i think!
  12. by   renerian
    Was the same for me in Ohio and Cali.

    renerian
  13. by   -jt
    I work in NYC and L.A. and there is a difference - different mentality & attitude. In LA, people are just more laid back. They dont even wear uniforms in the ICUs I work in there. Its probably not a whole coast thing but more just a thing at that hospital but for one whole shift I thought the girl at the bedside next to me was the pts daughter - until I had to go on break & found out she was the RN covering me. She was wearing black stretch pants, sneakers, a gray tee shirt & a sweater tied around her waist.

    In NYC, its a given that if you work in direct-care (hospital, nursing home, dialysis, surgery center, etc) you are union. Thats probably not the case along the whole East Coast. RNs in NYC have been unionized for more than 40 years. They expect to be in a union & have it work for them. In LA that concept still seems to be something new & foreign. But again, that might just be the cities & not the whole coast.

    It seems like every RN I meet in the ICUs at this LA hospital is white. And most RNs I worked with in LA are travelers. This last time, every RN on the unit was a traveler and I was agency. Only the charge RN was on staff. But you hardly ever come across a traveler in NYC. It seems most are staff RNs here. And the cultural, ethnic mix of NYC RNs seems to be more diverse. That may not be a whole coast - just my own experience in these cities.

    But theres not much difference in cost of living - though some things are more expensive in L.A. than in NYC (I couldnt believe the price of Snapple over there the first time I found one!) and I never do find anything that costs less in LA than it does in NYC. Not even the rent. A friend of mine pays $1200/mth for a very small 2 bedroom rented house in a middle class neighborhood in LA & it doesnt even have a backyard. It would cost less in a similar neighborhood in NYC.

    The work is the same in the ICUs Ive worked in both cities, but RN employment is different. The whole East Coast may not have higher salaries than the whole West Coast but from what I have experienced, NYC has better pay than LA. In NYC we are paid for our years of experience as an RN (not just at that particular facility), certifications, education degrees, shift diff, and a lot of other stuff that nurses in the hospital I work at in LA arent paid for. My salary in NYC as a staff RN is about $40/hr. If I was to take a staff RN job at that hospital in LA today it would be only $27/hr (with a very similar cost of living! I dont know how those nurses do it). I work through a local agency in LA for $33/hr on day shift - But in NYC agency pay is about $45/hr for day shift. I wouldnt be able to afford to be a traveler in LA either for what they get paid.

    As far as what RNs are allowed to do -- I dont think thats a coast thing either. In my ICU, the RNs can do everything -- except make vent changes. (Resp Therapy has an office right outside our ICU). But RNs in our PACU can make the vent changes. (The fact that they dont have a Resp Therapist available to cover PACU may have something to do with that). In the hospital down the street they can not shoot outputs in their ICU, or do half the things we can -- but they can make vent changes & we cant.

    I guess what you are allowed to do all depends more on the facility's policies & how much support staff it wants to cut than which coast you live on.
    Last edit by -jt on Dec 28, '02

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