Drop the BA path for the BSN?

  1. 1
    I'm currently a university student pursuing a BA in Sociocultural Anthropology however I've been doubting my intentions in getting this degree (it's not the most useful degree and it's just an easy Bachelors really despite the fact that it's highly interesting to me personally) and think I may be better suited for a nursing degree (more of a challenge and more direction for careers. Also, I'm certain I would enjoy it, I have this passion that I recently discovered for helping people improve themselves). My questions for students of nursing and nurses alike: have any of you had the challenge of decided on a BA or a BSN? If so did you drop the BA path in favor of the BSN?

    This indecision is eating me up. I have a year and a half left to finish this BA after three years at Community College but once I'm done with it I think I'd like to continue with school for a BSN otherwise I can stop this schooling, go back to Community College, finish pre-reqs, and then wait to get into nursing school. Both would take about the same amount of time but would it be advantageous to finish this degree and then continue for the BSN?

    I'm hoping there are other students/nurses who have gone through this and can give me advice and explain the ups and downs they had on whichever path they chose. Honestly, any life lessons or things you'd do differently and are willing to share will be very helpful and so much appreciated!

    A little addition, I'd like to go abroad as a nurse at some point as well (as can be deduced from my passion for Anthropology I'm highly interested in other cultures/languages).

    This was likely far too much information, but as a student I can't help but wonder what the future will bring and how to approach it. Thanks so much for any advice!
    lindarn likes this.

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  2. 15 Comments...

  3. 0
    I don't know what your financial situation is like, but if you ualify for Pell Grants, I would not get your BA first. This is from someone with a BS going back for an ABSN. Personally, if I were doing it over again and going to get my BSN right away, I would find out what prereqs I still needed for an upper division program, and register for all those classes while applying to your nursing program. Just my $.02
  4. 0
    Perhaps you should start researching "Doctor's Without Boarders".. from what I've read, there are a lot of nurses in this program.

    Being so close to your first degree choice, perhaps you should finish that one up and apply for an accelerated BSN after. It's really up to you.
  5. 0
    I don't know what your financial situation is like, but if you ualify for Pell Grants, I would not get your BA first.
    I do recieve Pell Grants at this time. So if I finished up this degree I wouldn't qualify any longer?
  6. 0
    Quote from dairymarie
    I do recieve Pell Grants at this time. So if I finished up this degree I wouldn't qualify any longer?
    Correct. Once you earn a bachelor's degree, you no longer qualify for any Pell Grants. My situation really irked me, as when I was a dependant of my parents I qualified for no federal aid, got my degree and now that I am responsible for myself, do not qualify for a Pell Grant because I already have a degree. Hence, my advice to try to maintain your Pell Grant.
  7. 0
    Wow! I could have written this myself! I completed a BA in anthropology, also have the itch to help people and then, years later went on to complete my BSN. I absolutely loved my anthro education and have no regrets. No matter what job I do, it will always be my background. Then again, I was not really career minded when I got my degree but was truly passionate about studying anthropology.

    That being said, I was able to get into an accelerated BSN program because I already had that degree. The challenges I came across were the fact that I had almost no hard sciences background. This is a very different way of testing and thinking in school. I had to get my chem, micro, anatomy/phy prereqs done before I could apply to any nursing school. It also cost me a ton because as stated above, grants are not generally available if you already have a degree.

    I chose to follow my passion at the time by getting my anthro degree and my path led me to nursing eventually. Is there a way you could complete your BA and throw in your sciences either as a minor or as electives? Conversely, could you major in nursing and minor in anthro?

    Best of luck - this is a good "problem" to have!
  8. 0
    Quote from dairymarie
    I'm currently a university student pursuing a BA in Sociocultural Anthropology however I've been doubting my intentions in getting this degree (it's not the most useful degree and it's just an easy Bachelors really despite the fact that it's highly interesting to me personally) and think I may be better suited for a nursing degree (more of a challenge and more direction for careers. Also, I'm certain I would enjoy it, I have this passion that I recently discovered for helping people improve themselves). My questions for students of nursing and nurses alike: have any of you had the challenge of decided on a BA or a BSN? If so did you drop the BA path in favor of the BSN?

    This indecision is eating me up. I have a year and a half left to finish this BA after three years at Community College but once I'm done with it I think I'd like to continue with school for a BSN otherwise I can stop this schooling, go back to Community College, finish pre-reqs, and then wait to get into nursing school. Both would take about the same amount of time but would it be advantageous to finish this degree and then continue for the BSN?

    I'm hoping there are other students/nurses who have gone through this and can give me advice and explain the ups and downs they had on whichever path they chose. Honestly, any life lessons or things you'd do differently and are willing to share will be very helpful and so much appreciated!

    A little addition, I'd like to go abroad as a nurse at some point as well (as can be deduced from my passion for Anthropology I'm highly interested in other cultures/languages).

    This was likely far too much information, but as a student I can't help but wonder what the future will bring and how to approach it. Thanks so much for any advice!
    If you really have a interest in the Health Care Profession, I would skip nursing (the PTB are flooding the market with new grads who cannot find a job), I would choose OT. It is a Masters Degree, and you will make more money, and have better hours.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn , RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
  9. 2
    Despites your interests, you should get a useful degree. I'm well aware that higher education isn't to provide job skills, but at this point in time it should be. You can read all the books you want about anthropology later in life. Right now you should cut your losses and start focusing on the BSN if that's what you think you want to do. You'll save money and time by doing so. Not only is that money out of your own pocket, but, as another reader pointed out on my skim down to the reply box here, that if you get a bachelor's degree you'll have less opportunities for financial aid after that if you need it. There's more money available for people who don't have degrees than for people that do.

    If you think there's another area of healthcare that interests you then start pursuing that now instead.
    RNJill and lindarn like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from lindarn
    If you really have a interest in the Health Care Profession, I would skip nursing (the PTB are flooding the market with new grads who cannot find a job), I would choose OT. It is a Masters Degree, and you will make more money, and have better hours.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn , RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    I would second this sentiment unless you really, really want to be a nurse. The job market for new nursing grads is very weak and in my opinion, will continue to be so for an extended period. Less than 40% of my graduating class from 2009 have been able to find jobs and the rate for the 2010 grads is something closer to 10%. While this is SE Pennsylvania, the situation is similar in NY, NJ, CA and AZ - these are the only states I've looked at the data for though I strongly suspect this is a national trend.

    A quick look at the job postings in your area can give you some idea. In SE PA, there seems to be more postings for OT and PT positions than for RNs.
  11. 0
    Quote from deemalt
    Then again, I was not really career minded when I got my degree but was truly passionate about studying anthropology.
    Hi deemalt, so since you graduated successfully with this degree did you find a job that you enjoyed? I'm guessing it didn't satisfy the need to help others, but if it was somewhat gratifying I might be able to endure it until I've earned enough to go back to school.

    Thank you so much for all the feedback! I have looked into OT and PT (my twin brother is actually persueing PT in college right now). I'll continue to do so. What frightens me about these two professions is the work involved to get there. I'm burning out of school fuel (don't we all) and fear that I might have a rough go at finishing a masters.

    Again, all of this advice is so very helpful!


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