Down to the nitty gritty... - page 2

by mrspolly 2,172 Views | 20 Comments

Hello Nurses! I am strongly considering going back to school for Nursing. As I tell my friends and family my idea, I get the usual comments about how gross it is. I am aware that there is a fair amount of time dealing with... Read More


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    If you're so concerned with how much poop/pee/puke/trachs etc is involved before you make your decision, then perhaps you've already made your decision. Nursing involves many aspects/fields and often along the path, you change your mind about what kind of nursing is right for you. Getting to the point of deciding what kind of nursing is right for you WILL involve poop/pee/puke/trachs etc, however. Including peds and "Women's Health".
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    Quote from mrspolly
    Hello Nurses!

    I am strongly considering going back to school for Nursing. As I tell my friends and family my idea, I get the usual comments about how gross it is. I am aware that there is a fair amount of time dealing with bodily fluids and such, but can you give me a better idea of it. Do you constantly have to clean up vomit, urine, feces, blood, etc? Do you have to change and wipe the behinds of adults a lot? I am primarily interested in Pediatrics and Women's Health, so I realize that that area may have a different set of "gross" things to handle. Can you shed some light on this subject for me?

    Thank you!
    I work in adult med surg and I do those things AT THE MINIMUM once a shift. Maybe a rare shift or two have passed where I haven't. But how do you think an incontinent demented pt gets cleaned up while on a bowel prep? Or even a young walkie talkie post op can vomit. Some shifts most of our patients need assistance of some sort with hygiene/toileting. Cleaning up poop, changing diapers, vomit and blood are what bother me least about nursing.There will be stage 4 ulcers to pack, AWFUL smelling wounds to dress (different orders regarding packing, wet to dry, ointments etc) ostomies to empty, suction canisters to change, ng tubes to insert, trach care, trach suctioning, suppositories, enemas,
    GrnTea likes this.
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    Quote from MoopleRN
    If you're so concerned with how much poop/pee/puke/trachs etc is involved before you make your decision, then perhaps you've already made your decision. Nursing involves many aspects/fields and often along the path, you change your mind about what kind of nursing is right for you. Getting to the point of deciding what kind of nursing is right for you WILL involve poop/pee/puke/trachs etc, however. Including peds and "Women's Health".
    I think you forgot to tell OP about dealing with that 'other' group that receives questions - providing care for those dead or dying.

    ATTN: I'm being facietious here!!!
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Oct 9, '12 : Reason: tidied up and removed symbols
    anotherone likes this.
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    Depends on what specialty you work. Some are really "dirty" and some not as much. I work psych and deal with a lot, and I mean a lot, of vomit but little feces/urine. Sadly, if I do deal with those, it's usually because someone is trying to throw it at me/co-workers/other clients, not because they have been incontinent.

    Vomit-Sorb is your friend!
    GeneralJinjur and DawnJ like this.
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    Quote from MoopleRN
    If you're so concerned with how much poop/pee/puke/trachs etc is involved before you make your decision, then perhaps you've already made your decision.
    I didn't take it that way at all. I think she's just trying to get an idea/more information. There is NOTHING wrong with asking questions when you are making a life choice, especially a fairly big one.
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    Quote from Elladora
    I didn't take it that way at all. I think she's just trying to get an idea/more information. There is NOTHING wrong with asking questions when you are making a life choice, especially a fairly big one.
    Thank you Elladora! I am the type of person to question everything before making a decision! I hear wayyyy to many nurses say "they wish they had known what nursing was really like before choosing this profession!" I don't want to regret this decision. This would be a second career for me, and going back to school for another Bachelor's degree is not something I take lightly!
    Elladora likes this.
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    I've been elbows deep in poo without trouble, yet the mere smell of fish makes me sick. Go figure.
    Esme12 and amoLucia like this.
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    Quote from Elladora
    I didn't take it that way at all. I think she's just trying to get an idea/more information. There is NOTHING wrong with asking questions when you are making a life choice, especially a fairly big one.
    Of course there's nothing wrong with asking questions when you are making a (fairly big) life choice. I never said there was. I simply got the (wrong?) impression that the OP was more concerned about how much she'd have to deal with that aspect of nursing vs the nursing field in general.

    Only the OP can decide if it's the right choice for her and asking around before deciding is smart. I just don't think she should focus on the "bodily fluids and such" to help her decide. Maybe she's not. That's what her OP is about though, IMO.
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    I can't answer for her (and she pretty much already answered for herself) but I highly doubt that is the only factor. Again, she seems to just be gathering information. Again, I'm guessing that she's already covered the big stuff and is down to, as the title suggests, the nitty gritty.
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    I wish I'd known what nursing was really like before I became a nurse. However, I'm referring to the responsibilty of patient's lives depending on you. Somehow I got thru school without realizing this-was I wearing blinders? Cleaning up a person is nothing compared to the responsibility nurses carry. I work in labor and delivery where all bodily functions can happen at once, in fact, one of our patients vomitted out her baby, we almost missed it because we were trying to help her up top not down below!


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