Don't wanna always give baths, clean up feces, etc., where to work? - page 7

In clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. I honestly want nothing to do with this once I'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can I work on as a new grad, in order to... Read More

  1. by   friendlyvisitor
    Great Subject! I'm applying to nursing school. Very excited about the prospect of being a nurse, however I'm afraid I will vomit from all the smells I'll encounter. This has weighed heavy on my mind. I finally decided it is a crazy reason to stay away from nursing. Do you get used to it? I can't even stand my own sons vomit and poop, how will I overcome a patients? Please tell me I'll get use to it!
  2. by   philosophical
    Quote from sonoran
    In the early days, doctors used to taste patients' urine to assess for diabetes, etc. I am glad I will never have to do that.

    I have seen disdain for poo amongst both older and younger nurses. One nurse in her 50s told me that she did not have her BSN to clean poo --that it was always the CNA's job. She would also make patients wait for pain pills if they used the call bell too much. I thought the last item was terrible.

    I am waiting to get into nursing school. I know that as I work around poo, it is not as gross. It is easier to clean up.
    I know I'll get flamed for this, but I don't think a RN should be giving baths and cleaning poo. You all are highly skilled professionals and leaving those tasks to a CNA would free up more of your time (hopefully) to take care of other tasks. Can't CNAs give a report of poo and vomitus? And I also think (in everyone's dreams), CNAs should ALWAYS be of staff to handle these tasks. Nurses are well paid compared to some other professions right of your school and it is a waste to resources to force RNs to do these tasks.

    Flame away!!
  3. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from philosophical
    I know I'll get flamed for this, but I don't think a RN should be giving baths and cleaning poo. You all are highly skilled professionals and leaving those tasks to a CNA would free up more of your time (hopefully) to take care of other tasks. Can't CNAs give a report of poo and vomitus? And I also think (in everyone's dreams), CNAs should ALWAYS be of staff to handle these tasks. Nurses are well paid compared to some other professions right of your school and it is a waste to resources to force RNs to do these tasks.

    Flame away!!
    i'm just trying to understand the correlation between educational level, and caring for your pt as a whole being...
    furthermore, i would never delegate disimpaction to a nursing assistant.

    leslie
  4. by   philosophical
    Quote from earle58
    i'm just trying to understand the correlation between educational level, and caring for your pt as a whole being...
    furthermore, i would never delegate disimpaction to a nursing assistant.

    leslie
    I mean there should be more CNAs that can be delegated to while the LPN or RN can focus more on other aspects of nursing care. Within a CNAs scope of practice of course.
  5. by   Dolce
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Seriously... you've got to learn to love your inner poo. Celebrate the poo. Embrace the poo.


    It's all about the poo.
    THANKS FOR THE LAUGH!!!! You are too funny!
  6. by   swee2000
    Quote from philosophical
    I know I'll get flamed for this, but I don't think a RN should be giving baths and cleaning poo. You all are highly skilled professionals and leaving those tasks to a CNA would free up more of your time (hopefully) to take care of other tasks. Can't CNAs give a report of poo and vomitus? And I also think (in everyone's dreams), CNAs should ALWAYS be of staff to handle these tasks. Nurses are well paid compared to some other professions right of your school and it is a waste to resources to force RNs to do these tasks.

    Flame away!!
    Start ducking, cause here come the flames. :angryfire

    Seriously, my head is starting to hurt from reading these ridiculous comments. As one poster said earlier, "Nursing is wholistic. You care for the whole person...Cleaning up mess...is part of the basics of nursing". That doesn't mean you stop being a nurse at the sight of pee, poop, or whatever bodily fluid is coming out. Who do you think cared for the patients before CNAs came around?

    I don't know why people think that RNs are so above the law, so-to-speak, that when they get out of school & pass Boards, they don't ever have to do the "dirty work" again? Yes, it is something the CNAs should be first in line to do. But that doesn't mean an RN can't step up to the plate, especially if she's got the time &/or the CNA is busy with another patient. It's called teamwork people! Heck, it's called nursing.
    Last edit by swee2000 on Nov 9, '07
  7. by   leslie :-D
    actually, i find it extremely helpful to see/smell feces, urine, blood and vomit.
    they are an integral part of my assessments.

    leslie
  8. by   EmmaG
    Quote from earle58
    actually, i find it extremely helpful to see/smell feces, urine, blood and vomit.
    they are an integral part of my assessments.

    leslie
    Exactly.
  9. by   happydays352
    To the OP before I started working as a caregiver I was afraid and I didn't think I could handle it. Now I give showers, clean up poop off of people, carpets, and occasionally myself, 52 hours a week. The smell doesn't even bother me anymore

    I'm so over poop

    You have to think of it this way though; someone is willing to share their most private and intimate self with you, to be completely exposed and vulnerable to a stranger. How incredible is that? That trust and faith in you is something you should honor and cherish. Not many other professions can lay claim to that.
  10. by   rn undisclosed name
    Quote from philosophical
    I know I'll get flamed for this, but I don't think a RN should be giving baths and cleaning poo. You all are highly skilled professionals and leaving those tasks to a CNA would free up more of your time (hopefully) to take care of other tasks. Can't CNAs give a report of poo and vomitus? And I also think (in everyone's dreams), CNAs should ALWAYS be of staff to handle these tasks. Nurses are well paid compared to some other professions right of your school and it is a waste to resources to force RNs to do these tasks.

    Flame away!!
    Ready for some more flames.

    If I am in a room and know a patient needs to be cleaned up I just do it. If shouldn't be beneath you to do it just because you are a nurse. If it was they wouldn't have you doing it in nursing school, now would they? You think they teach you this just to kill time?

    How horrible it would be for me to let a pt sit in poo while I go and find the aide to do it. The only time I will have a patient sit in poo is if it will put their safety at risk to try and stand up and they are a 2 person assist. I hurry up and find someone to come and help me. Really it takes a couple of minutes to get it cleaned up and then you can move on to your next task.

    Nobody likes doing it. I guess I'm not willing to let my patient lay there in pee/poop and risk having some skin breakdown that they didn't previously have.

    I can't get over it. I am just horrified by some peoples thoughts on this whole thing. Would you really want to lay there while the nurse went to get someone else to clean you up because she thought she was too good to clean you up. As for vomit I try to get that away from the patient asap. All that's going to do is just make them more nauseous.
  11. by   Dolce
    Quote from philosophical
    I know I'll get flamed for this, but I don't think a RN should be giving baths and cleaning poo. You all are highly skilled professionals and leaving those tasks to a CNA would free up more of your time (hopefully) to take care of other tasks. Can't CNAs give a report of poo and vomitus? And I also think (in everyone's dreams), CNAs should ALWAYS be of staff to handle these tasks. Nurses are well paid compared to some other professions right of your school and it is a waste to resources to force RNs to do these tasks.

    Flame away!!
    Yes, CNAs can and do report BMs and emesis but that does not mean that nurses shouldn't be involved in cleaning patients up. So much of a nurse's assessment is based on bodily fluids. Poop, urine and sputum have so much value to a diagnosis that I would never delegate an assessment of such to a CNA. I need to personally know what it smells like, looks like, its amount, its texture, consistency, etc, etc, etc. Of course many CNAs have a good assessment of c-diff or a GI bleed but I don't want to call a physician and say, "My CNA thinks his poop looks like is blood in it but I didn't look at it because I'm an RN." I want to know for myself. This is what I get paid to do.

    An attitude of, "I am so above this" really can be perceived by the patient. Imagine if you were a patient who had soiled yourself and your nurse said, "Just a minute. The CNA will have to clean you up. I don't do that. I'm an RN." Patients should never be made to feel worse about their situation than they already do.
    Last edit by Dolce on Nov 9, '07
  12. by   nyapa
    Quote from Hopefull2009
    However, I have a friend that is an RN in a major city and she hasn't touched a bedpan in 15 years....management doesn't WANT them to give baths, etc...b/c they have extensive CNA staffing, and they want them to utililize their time doing other things.
    Yes, it is great to have CNA staffing. We usually have one (patient care assistant) on our floor a shift, and every little thing that person does is so appreciated. I call them the 'quiet achievers' because noone sees what they do, but if you don't have them there, then you find out what they do do!

    But I don't agree with not touching a bedpan, or attending a wash etc. Yeah, I hate dealing with it too, but as I said previously, it is important for assessment, as well as patient physical and psychological comfort. It is everyone's responsibility, not just the LPN (EN in our country), CNA etc.

    In an aside, where I work we have Aboriginal Health Workers in our hospitals. They are great because they bring a cultural aspect to our role; they do the job of an EN as well, and like nurses and doctors and physios et al they must be licensed to practice. In the remote communities they almost have an RN role. One AHW told me how an RN had left a patient in a dirty bed, and actually paged the AHW to come and clean her up! Made me hang my head in shame...
    Last edit by nyapa on Nov 9, '07
  13. by   JBudd
    Quote from RN1989
    WHERE have you been where a doctor deals with bodily functions and fluids? I have yet to see a doctor do anthing except step back and call for a nurse when anything needs fixing or cleaning up.
    In my ER the docs mostly do their own disimpactions. I've even seen a few slide the odd bedpan in. We're a level 3 trauma center, so it isn't like we aren't all busy! And while we are log rolling the C-spine trauma patient, the rectal temp just might get taken as well by a doc.

    Too many complications possible with a disimpaction for anyone but an MD or nurse to be doing it.

    To the OP, these are such a small part of the day, that if you think this is all we do (although we do doo very well); well, you still have no idea what real nursing is all about. Just a piece of the puzzle for a shift.

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