Don't Risk Your Job Over Social Media - page 2

Social media The use of social media and other electronic communication is expanding exponentially; today’s generation of nurses grew up in a social media milieu. Social media provides... Read More

  1. by   Tommy5677
    The first thing you have to do and the first thing I ever did was to create a personal social media policy. It does not afford complete protection but do not ever "friend" coworkers on FB. EVER! Even after I leave a position I do not friend them. If they're offended by that, too bad. The 2nd thing in all of that is do not ever make disparaging remarks about anyone with whom you work, including your employer.
    Many a person has lost their job because of FB & Twitter. As some here already know, I can be a loudmouth and that includes on social media. But, who's gonna fire you over political view unless they want to be an a**.?
    The biggest tragically stupid posting on Twitter that I can recall was the woman who posted before getting on her flight to South Africa, was fired in mid flight and realized it after landing. All because of an ignorant racist remark she made.
    Best advice. Think before hitting that send button!
  2. by   traumaRUs
    There have been comments that being a nurse puts you on a pedestal, doesn't allow you enough freedom to express yourself, etc.

    This isn't only in the nursing world, many companies check out your social media presence prior to employment. They do this for a number of reasons:

    1. Ensuring they are projecting a positive image as in they don't want their customers viewing their employees unfavorably

    2. Looking at the organizations, FB pages, FB communities, etc that you belong to to see if they are in line with company policy

    3. Overall seeing if you are a person that posts off the cuff, resulting in later apologies
  3. by   kbrn2002
    "Lindsay posted a picture of herself on Facebook at a party showing a lot of side boobage.
    It was shocking and hard to reconcile the image of her as a responsible nurse in scrubs with a blatantly sexy picture. Of all the hundreds of images she posted, this may have been most memorable. She took it down, it stayed up only 24 hours, but the damage was done. It’s not that it wasn’t attractive, it’s poor judgment." QUOTE FROM OP [sorry, no quote button with the original article.]

    Poor judgment? That I'm sorry is lousy. No reason a nurse shouldn't be able to go out wearing whatever he or she wants. If there is any professional fallout from an employer that wouldn't be a place I'd want to work anyway.
  4. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from kbrn2002
    "Lindsay posted a picture of herself on Facebook at a party showing a lot of side boobage.
    It was shocking and hard to reconcile the image of her as a responsible nurse in scrubs with a blatantly sexy picture. Of all the hundreds of images she posted, this may have been most memorable. She took it down, it stayed up only 24 hours, but the damage was done. It’s not that it wasn’t attractive, it’s poor judgment." QUOTE FROM OP [sorry, no quote button with the original article.]

    Poor judgment? That I'm sorry is lousy. No reason a nurse shouldn't be able to go out wearing whatever he or she wants. If there is any professional fallout from an employer that wouldn't be a place I'd want to work anyway.
    You can't control employer's perceptions, and unfortunately, whatever you post becomes part of the perception.

    Think what would happen if a judge posted highly immodest or suggestive selfies on social media.
  5. by   raindrops1234
    Quote from kbrn2002
    "Lindsay posted a picture of herself on Facebook at a party showing a lot of side boobage.
    It was shocking and hard to reconcile the image of her as a responsible nurse in scrubs with a blatantly sexy picture. Of all the hundreds of images she posted, this may have been most memorable. She took it down, it stayed up only 24 hours, but the damage was done. It’s not that it wasn’t attractive, it’s poor judgment." QUOTE FROM OP [sorry, no quote button with the original article.]

    Poor judgment? That I'm sorry is lousy. No reason a nurse shouldn't be able to go out wearing whatever he or she wants. If there is any professional fallout from an employer that wouldn't be a place I'd want to work anyway.
    I also found this to be a little extreme. I have a large top in comparison to the rest of my body and if I wear anything remotely low cut it could be considered "inappropriate." (Although I will avoid showing off any cleavage on a day to day basis, sometimes I like to wear a fancy cut out top on a rare night out.
  6. by   Cowboyardee
    Quote from Nurse Beth
    You can't control employer's perceptions, and unfortunately, whatever you post becomes part of the perception.

    Think what would happen if a judge posted highly immodest or suggestive selfies on social media.
    You're talking about what does happen; the previous poster was talking about what should happen.

    I'm well aware that employers are legally allowed to police the private lives of their employees and fire them for whatever reason they want in most states. That's their right, by law. At the same time, I also believe that your example's degree of off-hours morality policing is driven by either an insufferable sense of moral prissiness, or callous and cowardly wariness of defending an institution from any and all criticism at the expense of the individuals who make up the institution. As such, anyone who considers firing a nurse for a 'racy' photo (that still meets FB's terms of service) deserves condemnation. Screw those jerks.
  7. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from Cowboyardee

    I also believe that your example.... is driven by either an insufferable sense of moral prissiness, or callous and cowardly wariness of defending an institution from any and all criticism at the expense of the individuals who make up the institution.
    Point taken. Thank you for your point of view.
  8. by   Miss Rayanne
    I use both Facebook and Twitter, and here is my policy. I don't ever post protected health information or air my employer's dirty laundry. Other than that, I reserve the right to post whatever I want, whenever I want. If my employer can't handle it, they can fire me. I love to debate and I've taken positions that were controversial. I've even dropped a few F-bombs. I would rather not work for a company who feels the need to censor me.
  9. by   klone
    A very good reason why I do not post where I work, and I do not friend anyone who also works at my place of employment.
  10. by   lindseylpn
    Quote from kbrn2002
    "Lindsay posted a picture of herself on Facebook at a party showing a lot of side boobage.
    It was shocking and hard to reconcile the image of her as a responsible nurse in scrubs with a blatantly sexy picture. Of all the hundreds of images she posted, this may have been most memorable. She took it down, it stayed up only 24 hours, but the damage was done. It’s not that it wasn’t attractive, it’s poor judgment." QUOTE FROM OP [sorry, no quote button with the original article.
    I know of a nurse that is an aspiring Instagram model and she has posted several topless photos to her public profile, in addition to 100s of other modeling photos. On the same profile she has posted selfies from work. I don't think she's been a nurse very long though, I think she was doing the modeling first. It doesn't seem to have effected her negativity but, I can see how it could.

    I know several people that have been fussed at over social media where I work, although I don't know if anyone has ever been fired. I keep my Facebook private but, I do friend coworkers. I try not to post anything questionable really. 90% of my posts are pics of my dogs, lol.
  11. by   undefeated-lvn
    augh will never forget having a meet and greet with mother,as far I knew the meet and greet went swell went home logged into my fb and she was posted as a friend suggestion..which means she looked me up immediately after I left fortunately I hardly ever post anything on fb I more so log in to see what other ppl post ...needless to say in the end I didn't accept the case.
  12. by   NurseSpeedy
    I don't have a FaceBook account. I just don't have time for all that drama in my life. I commonly get asked by parents of my daughter's friends and my reply is,"no". If I get a strange look I elaborate by saying, "look, I was born when DOS was common and the internet was dial up when I was in high school and charged by the hour. There was this thing called AOL and my family didn't even own a computer. I'm a dinosaur". I even had a coworker that responded, "that's just weird" when I stated I didn't use FaceBook.

    I found out what Twitter was a few years ago after getting agrevated watching a music award show on tv that kept saying "hashtag" and some phrase following it. I had finally figured out how to text and asked my younger brother what it was. His reply, "the # sign". I interpret this as the pound sign. My now seven year old child calls it a hashtag. Needless to say, she has taught me how to use an iPhone. I still don't have a Twitter account.

    I don't view myself as old and I'm not really. Seeing how much things have changed since I graduated high school though I can't help but feel time stamped in a way. I just here so much about the problems that people have from communicating this way and I have to think, "is all that really worth it?". I don't know. I prefer the telephone or face to face conversations. I literally broke out in hives a few weeks ago when a response to a job application was a computer webcam video interview request. Am I the only person that thinks those cameras make us look terrible?
  13. by   CraigB-RN
    You may not have a Facebook account, but you are on social media. Allnurses.com falls into the social media category, and no one can say there isn't a lot of drama here at time.

    Platforms like Facebook, twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc are tools that can have a valid role in a nurses personal and professional development. They key is how it's used.

    Friends. You don't have to friend anyone on Facebook and you don't have to post anything. So why bother then. Well Facebook is a place were professional organizations have a presence. For example as a Critical Care and ED nurse I follow the AACN, ENA and there are pages set up by people to present current up to date information that can directly affect my nursing practice. The same for twitter and other platforms.

    What gets people into trouble, is what they post, and that isn't any different that posting here.

    The area that I think gets nurses into trouble is the perception that they are truly anonymous on social media. That goes for here also. Being Anon on SoMe gives you a false sense of security, and sometimes leads people to post things that they really shouldn't. It is surprisingly easy to get outed on Social Media and it's happened pretty frequently.

    But if you think about SoMe as sitting in a bar or even a street corner and that it's possible for you boss to walk by and hear you, and adjust what you say accordingly, You'll be fine.

    I made a conscious decision not to be Anon on social medial. My whole name is plastered out there. I routinely chat and discuss topics that directly affect my nursing practice with Dr's and Nurses from all over the world. I've had direct discussions with the movers and shakers of the nursing world. (I've chatted with Patricia Benner)

    Have I screwed up? Yup. I've posted things that I shouldn't have, but then again i've made comments about my employer while at a local AACN chapter meeting.

    So get online and use the tools we have. Just don't smeg your boss, your co workers, the hospital across town, and definitely don't share any protected health information and show compassion and common sense when posting. Don't be scared of it, use it.,

    Oh and it is ok to post pictures of what your having for dinner on twitter.
    p.p.s You don't have to follow Justin Beaber or the Kardasians.

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