Don't know what to expect in nursing

  1. hello all
    my name is brandy. i have officially registered for classes in my local community college. i am nervous i don' t know what to expect or if nursing is something is something i will enjoy. i have chose this field primarily because i felt the need to do something that matters in life. ( i was a retail manager for many years) i have a 5 yr old and i am 3 months pregnant now. i know this will be a challenge educationally. will it be something that keeps me intrigued? any words of wisdom? i am wandering through this in the dark.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   nurseangel47
    Hi, Brandy
    I went to nursing school when I was in my late twenties, with an infant and a three year old at home to take care of. My husband then (I'm divorced from him now) traveled in his job and was usually gone from home out of state in business mostly four out of five weekdays!
    If it hadn't been for a very supportive dear kind sweet motherinlaw and mother to help raise my kids while he was gone, too, I could not have done it!
    I just kept my nose in the books, studied as long and hard as I had to, tried not to be so nervous about finally getting a college degree with so many other personal responsibilities at home to worry about, etc.
    I did it. If I can do it, I know that just about anyone can! I was a poor student in high school due to extracurricular activities.
    I think that just clinging to the goal of becoming a nurse was a pride thing for me so much so that I put on blinders to everything else in my life.
    I don't recommend it and would've put it off 'til the youngest started kindergarten just so I wouldn't have the guilt of not attending to their needs as much as their grandmommies did to help me out.
    It is always intriguing. It is the kind of career where you never get bored. There is always more to learn. Technology keeps making enough strides and research creating enough new modalities of treatments that you will always have more and more to learn and apply to your patients.
    Continuing education also is a big part of nursing these days.
    I think you should go for it. Just remember, family should come first. You may or may not decide to do it now while they're little. Everyone's priorities are different. I say go for it now or at least as soon as the little one is in kindergarten.
    Good luck!
  4. by   PACNWNURSING
    Brandy, I would suggest you go to a hospital and talk to nurses, job shadow them and see if this is something you really want to pursue, visiting this forum is a good start. Read the forum for new nurses who recently graduated and have been working for a year. This will give you an indication if your really want to pursue nursing. That being said, there is much more to nursing today then just bed side nursing, best of luck !!!!!!
  5. by   Miyoung107
    I too just started nursing school. We've already been put into rotations and I wonder how it will be like when I start working as a nurse. I've encountered more nurses who are unhelpful and cold to the students and only a few that will take the time to help you out....is this how we will be treated upon graduating and working for the first time? Also, I worry that when I first start working I still wont know what im doing. Do you think that what you learned during school is enough or is becoming a nurse all about time and experience?

    Thanks!
  6. by   patwil73
    Quote from Miyoung107
    I too just started nursing school. We've already been put into rotations and I wonder how it will be like when I start working as a nurse. I've encountered more nurses who are unhelpful and cold to the students and only a few that will take the time to help you out....is this how we will be treated upon graduating and working for the first time? Also, I worry that when I first start working I still wont know what im doing. Do you think that what you learned during school is enough or is becoming a nurse all about time and experience?

    Thanks!
    Miyoung107 - I'm sorry to hear about your experience with nurses and hope they don't scare you away from being a nurse. One thing to consider (and it is not an excuse) is that nurses deal with depressing issues every day, patients that no matter what you do don't get better, patients that continue to make bad decisions regarding their healthcare no matter how many times you educate them, adults who die, kids who die, understaffed with the constant fear that you forgot something or are missing something. With all that nurses are supposed to maintain an equilibrium when dealing with patients (they can't take it out on them) so who do they turn to to bark at? Colleagues and unfortunately students. So the next time someone is rude just take that deep breath and try to remember it may not be personal, they're just having a bad day (of course nurses are human too, and they may just be unpleasant people, but I doubt the majority are that way)

    As for is nursing school is enough for nursing I look at it like building a house. Nursing school provides the foundation and framework for the house. Experience fills in the walls, furniture and decorations. And just as you will move things around in your home through the years, so too will you learn new things that change your practice as you gain experience.

    Hope this helps,

    Pat
  7. by   Daytonite
    hi, brandy!

    i am posting some links that have information about the career of nursing for you to check out. i'm also giving you a couple of links on how to study, something every new college student needs to know!

    welcome to allnurses!

    http://www.discovernursing.com/

    http://www.nursingsociety.org/career/cmap.html

    http://www.wetfeet.com/content/careers/nursing.aspx - about nursing from webfeet.com

    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/...ers/42226.html - "thinking about nursing school? consider your many options" from the college board.

    http://nursing.about.com/od/becomean...eforenurse.htm - "before you decide to become a nurse". things to consider about being a nurse. lots of links to information about what skills you need to become a nurse. and, what if you're really bad at math and science is discussed.

    http://nursing.about.com/od/becomean...oreveryone.htm - "nursing is not for everyone". this is a very down to earth and honest article that broadly discusses what a nurse does and what you can expect on the job as a nurse.

    http://nursing.about.com/od/nursings...sferskills.htm - "nurses skills transfer to other professions". a list of 8 basic job skills that nurses are able to perform making them desirable for hire in many other professions.

    http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm - about registered nursing from the u.s. department of labor

    http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos102.htm - about lpn nursing from the u.s. department of labor

    http://www.accd.edu/sac/history/kell...tg/ssindex.htm - strategies for success, an online primer and tutorial on how to study for students from the alamo community college. this is a pretty extensive resource with links on the right side of the page to click into the following subjects: learning styles, note taking, memory techniques, time management, overcoming procrastination, sq3r (a method for getting the most out of reading your textbooks), study tips, critical thinking, preparing for tests, and oral presentations. also, take a look at the faq's (frequently asked questions).

    http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdysk/checklis.html - this is a study skill checklist for you to go through and inventory your study habits from virginia polytechnic institute and state university. at the bottom of the form is the link to "study skills self-help information" which is all kinds of information to help you with areas you were weak on in the checklist. if you want to bypass the checklist and just go into the information section, go to this link http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdysk/stdyhlp.html

    http://www.how-to-study.com/index.html - how to study.com: a study skills resource. has a variety of study skills on the website, plus a section on how to read your textbooks. topics addressed on this site include: taking notes, listening, solving math word problems, using references sources, spelling long words, essay tests, test anxiety, using abbreviations, study groups, test taking strategies, reading comprehension, remembering information, vocabulary building, writing a research paper, making oral presentations, managing time, writing techniques, multiple-choice tests and more.

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