Does God Make Mistakes? - page 9

by itsmeemtp 26,196 Views | 84 Comments

I looked up at the doctor across the crib who is still hovering over him and checking his ventilator and trachea. Wildly he flailed as the doctor touched his abdomen. I tried to calm him by holding his hand. This is the first... Read More


  1. 0
    Thanks for sharing such a heartfelt story. That was very well written.
  2. 0
    Beautiful.

    It's nice to know there are some that still hold belief in their hearts especially in a society that is trying so hard to remove God from everything and then wonder why things are so bad.

    I am hoping those who read this article will be encouraged to keep nursing and caring for those who are in need and give glory to where it is due
  3. 1
    Amen ! I do not know why some people are so embarrassed or hesistant w/ their faith and belief ....what's with that??? I could not imagine a Godless existence. Be it a Goddess or God, this is still acceptance that someone , or something is much bigger and way much powerful than us . Some scientist do not believe in anything that they can not prove, but the deeper they try to solve something , the more they realize that "things" will not be in it 's perfect order , (such as the universe), if left by itself. Now think about it.............................
    LethaChristina likes this.
  4. 2
    so timely for me right now.
    I have just graduated from an RN program. a month before my grad my dad needed emergency brain surgery for an injury he sustained at work. Due to a series of complications, what should have been a relatively easy surgery turned into him being put into a medically induced coma. It has been over a month now, and he is slowly coming back to us.

    All the while, there have been great nurses, and there have been horrible nurses. I have learned such valuable things from both kinds. We have had thoughtless and hurtful things said to us, in front of us, and within earshot unbeknownst to them. There have been things said in the presence of my father who was in a deep coma, that I am sure he heard, because now that he is semi-lucid, he nods 'yes' when I ask him certain things to see if he remembers anything from when he was 'out'. My father has been treated as a 'throw-away' patient in the ICU because he is 72 and a brain injury. A few of his nurses never even bothered to get the back-story, and did not know that he worked for a month with a chronic subdural bleed after his original concussion, that he is ridiculously healthy and active and strong in real life. That he is tough as nails. That he beat terminal cancer 24 years ago when told he had 3 months to live. That he was put into a coma by his neurologist, he didn't go into a coma because of his injury. They treated him (and us) like he was a hopeless case, a vegetable. We were actually told by one nurse that his treatment was a waste of time.

    The biggest thing I have learned is that it is not up to us to cast judgement on a family's choices for their loved ones. It is not up to us to share our opinion or use diagnostic or prognostic language. Our job is to support patients and their families wherever they are at, nothing more than that. The grief, the reality, the anguish and doom and gloom will take care if itself, trust me. We don't need to add to it.

    I will never again judge anyone for not signing a DNR. I will never again judge anyone for any decision they make at any time. People do what they need to do at any given moment and it is up to us to be advocates for them.

    I went to my graduation this past week, and cried as I crossed the stage because my dad should have been there to see me. I also felt guilty for being there because I was not sure he was getting the care he needed while I was 4h away. I did not trust his nurses to care for him without me there advocating. It occurred to me again and again that this should never be the case. Nurses should ALWAYS be our advocates. I have not felt that yet during this experience. I have told the nurse-manager of the ICU this.

    He is slowly making a recovery, is awake and is starting to move his body, his arms and legs. His eyes open, and when his trach was plugged he spoke his first words to my mother in over a month- she told him she couldn't wait to get him home to his own bed. His response? 'What are we waiting for?' followed by a chuckle. The floor is abuzz with the news of my dad's awakening.

    All this from a man who we were told would not survive, and his life was not worth the effort we were making.
    As nurses, this is not up to us to decide.
    Esme12 and Päivi like this.
  5. 0
    Can I just ask how old he was?


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