Does anyone think nursing diagnoses are just plain silly? - page 11

Does anyone think nursing diagnoses are just plain silly - overly literal and laughably complex? (please see examples at end of this post) Are we trying so hard to legitimize nursing as a... Read More

  1. by   Daytonite
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    I assume I will teach nursing students someday (when I get this MSN in 2010), but I certainly am not going to obsess over wording like some of my instructors did.
    And, I hope you get to do that! You may not obsess over the exact wording, but you will obsess over the critical thinking that goes into the construction of those 3-part nursing diagnostic statements!
    Quote from marie-francoise
    In fact, the textbooks would be marvelously reduced in size were the nursing dx's removed from them...
    Now, that is just wrong! Are you saying that if nursing diagnoses are removed from nursing textbooks they will be slim volumes? I don't think so. I went to nursing school in the early 1970s before nursing diagnoses were introduced and my textbooks were just as thick and heavy as the ones today. How do you account for that?
    Quote from marie-francoise
    Pulmonary edema shouldn't be described as "impaired gas exchange due to .... " oh, boy, I can't even remember the rest of it, it was so complex... something about how not enough respiratory gases can get into the bloodstream due to "excess fluid volume".
    can't even remember the rest of it, it was so complex? I would imagine that this ought to be learned by the time to take NCLEX rolls around. Edema in the lungs is a symptom. And understanding the underlying pathophysiology is how you get to the ventilation perfusion imbalance that is causing the dyspnea of pulmonary edema to occur. This must be understood in order to grasp why this diagnosis might get assigned to a patient with pulmonary edema. While identifying the correct nursing diagnosis is important, knowing the underlying reason for the problem that is occurring is also just as crucial. It is critical. It involves critical thinking. I think blaming the nursing diagnosis is taking potshots at the wrong target when the real issue is not understanding the underlying etiology of the patient problem in this particular case.
  2. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Daytonite
    Edema in the lungs is a symptom. And understanding the underlying pathophysiology is how you get to the ventilation perfusion imbalance that is causing the dyspnea of pulmonary edema to occur. This must be understood in order to grasp why this diagnosis might get assigned to a patient with pulmonary edema. While identifying the correct nursing diagnosis is important, knowing the underlying reason for the problem that is occurring is also just as crucial. It is critical. It involves critical thinking. I think blaming the nursing diagnosis is taking potshots at the wrong target when the real issue is not understanding the underlying etiology of the patient problem in this particular case.
    This is offensive. There is no one here who doesn't understand the underlying etiology and saying that we don't because we find nursing diagnoses clumsy and unnecessarily cumbersome is taking potshots.
  3. by   sirI
    Thread closed for staff review.

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