doctor's right and patient's right versus nurse's rights...

  1. I know that there are patients and doctors that treat nurses like maids and look at themeselves as gods. if they don't like what you did, they'll complain it to your superior

    my question, up to what point would you still consider that that right is their right and up to what point would you consider it your right?

    my mom is also a nurse and she sometimes tell stories about how she defended herself against patients and doctor's who treats her like dirt and who don't like her.....but her way is a little out of the nurse's code of ethics such as throwing back the blanket thrown at her, punching a doctor in the face (don't know the reason), telling patient who don't like her that she also don't want to give her service to him and then walked out, and even telling an arabic kid to take a bath first because she doesn't want to give a vaccine to a stinking kid and many more..... my mom's has a very very strong personality that she let no one treat her like dirt.....fortunately, her license still wasn't put on jeopardy so as her job
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from cloudstrife1ph
    I know that there are patients and doctors that treat nurses like maids and look at themeselves as gods. if they don't like what you did, they'll complain it to your superior

    my question, up to what point would you still consider that that right is their right and up to what point would you consider it your right?

    my mom is also a nurse and she sometimes tell stories about how she defended herself against patients and doctor's who treats her like dirt and who don't like her.....but her way is a little out of the nurse's code of ethics such as throwing back the blanket thrown at her, punching a doctor in the face (don't know the reason), telling patient who don't like her that she also don't want to give her service to him and then walked out, and even telling an arabic kid to take a bath first because she doesn't want to give a vaccine to a stinking kid and many more..... my mom's has a very very strong personality that she let no one treat her like dirt.....fortunately, her license still wasn't put on jeopardy so as her job

    I hope and pray that you do not think what your mother did was in any way correct. That type of behavior would not be tolerated anywhere and should not have been where she is working either. To hit another in the face like that is physical assault and she would have been charged here and had to appear in court. And if she did not like the odor coming from a patient, then she should have taken the time to give him a bath........she is a nurse.............and she does not get to select who she will treat and will not.

    Please do not follow in her foot steps, it will not get you far in your career.
  4. by   RunnerRN
    In nursing (as in life) there is a big difference in being assertive and aggressive. A good nurse is assertive - she stands up for her rights and those of her patients in a respectful manner. An aggressive nurse is not a good thing...this is a person who is difficult to work with. In my practice I have refused to give a med, requested a med, advocated for certain things, and asked family/visitors to leave. Always in a respectful but firm manner.

    I work in the ER, and have decided that I have certain rights.....to be safe (this is #1 to me and I don't hesitate to make that a certain thing). I also feel that the care of my patient comes next. If this means kicking out visitors that are being disruptive, or just asking them to leave for a procedure, I will do it. I have walked out of the room of a pt room being disrespectful (of course, did my ABCs first.....pt yelling, definite airway and breathing, skin PWD).

    I'm sure your mom is a nice person, but even people with "strong personalities" need to tone it down at work, and keep their priorities straight.
  5. by   Blee O'Myacin
    With that comes the obligation that you will not commit assault and battery on a coworker (or anyone else), and abusive to patients (calling the "arabic" child "stinking" - the fact that you refered to this person's ethnicity speaks volumes IMO). This has nothing to do with the so-called "MD-G-d complex", and everything to do with a person who should not be working with the public until she seeks professional help.

    If I had to work with such a person, I'd be complaining as well - no matter what the person's job title.

    Blee
  6. by   jo272wv
    Im taking the question is not dealing with your mother so I will only comment on your concern. If a pt is disrespectful to me, I simply inform them that I will do all I can to assist their needs but will not be a punching bag for them. I continue by offering them another nurse if they feel I can not meet their needs. I end by telling them we started out on the wrong foot can we start over. This works 90 percent of the time. If a doctor disrespects me, which does not happen that often, I simply look them in the eye and state that when they can treat me like a human being I will be more then happy to discuss any issues. Then I go see my pts. I follow up by writing a incident report to cover my ////. Respect goes both ways, when taking a stand you must remain professional and keep a normal tone to your voice. yelling back will never solve a problem.
  7. by   TazziRN
    I have stood up for myself with docs and pts as well as other nurses, but not to the point of being rude and even mean and disrespectful. I would never refuse care because someone smelled.

    It everyone's right to be unhappy with a situation but it's how it's handled that's important.

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