Doctors "firing" patients - page 2

I had never known this could be done before. I've been up on my floor for 1.5 months or so, and seen 2 patients who were fired by their doctors. First one I don't remember the details, really, but... Read More

  1. Visit  nursejoey05 profile page
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    Rest assured, ladies. I have gone out of my way not to tell people about this. Like I said, I have only told the people that have point blank asked me. I had to give a reason, or else we look like drug seekers or something like that. Plus I didn't want a potential new provider to not give us care based on an assumption that we must have done something to "deserve" to be fired. Oh, BTW, we received that certified firing letter on Monday, I was out there in person Tuesday morning a paid the bill in full. The office staff acted like they didn't know a thing, and I didn't even say a thing to them. Then when we received the certified letter about the bill, I wrote to the attorney and told him that I had paid what the doc's office told me was due before he had even written that letter. Of course, the doctor's office came up with some additional charges, and I had to pay those, but after the lawyer heard the whole story, he wrote off his attorney fees so I didn't have to pay them. The whole thing stinks, INHO, but we do like our new doctor. First thing he said was "just because someone tells you that you have a disease and you are going to live X amount of time, doesn't mean it's true. Just statistics." Our other doc was like "let's just keep you comfortable". I like the new doc's attitude (although I think it is hard to argue with Mayo Clinic
  2. Visit  TechieNurse profile page
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    First, let me say that my heart goes out to you nursejoey. What a terrible thing to happen while you're trying to support your husband, go to school and raise a family!

    Second, there are some valid reasons that patients get 'fired' that have been previously posted (non-compliance with treatments, drug seeking behavior etc.).
    But I'm here to give you other, not so valid reasons...
    Having worked in and around the insurance industry for years, I can tell you that patients get fired for financial and legal issues.

    I've seen physicians fire patients when they're nearing their insurance cap (by their own estimates) knowing that they won't be able to get reimbursed over Medicare/Medicaid rates once that caps reached.

    I've also seen it happen when physicians try experimental/unproven treatments, procedures +/or medications to avoid a lawsuit. For example, they have their patients try a new drug (or more commonly, off label use of an existing drug), usually being vague about the newness, potential side effects, efficacy etc., then they later find out about side effects or complications of the drug. Instead of working with the patient, they 'fire' them (usually citing non-compliance) to avoid being sued.

    Lastly, as in your case nursejoey, I've seen some cowardly physicians fire patients who are terminal either because they can't stand losing a patient or, more likely they are afraid for their reputation.

    Of course, the situations described above are unethical, but I'm sad to say that I've seen it happen...
  3. Visit  mandrews profile page
    0
    I was fired by my doc when I was in nursing school. The office did major hippa violation by calling a friend from Church and telling her about my health status at the time, address, husband and childrens names, etc. I was told there had never been a true class action case yet and they would only be fined $100.00 so I dropped it because I live in a small town with ONE hospital. The doc acts like he has never met me before, and I kill him with kindness.
    When I interviewed with the DON ( friend of mom ) I told her what happened and said It wouldn't be a problem working with him. She told me he had caused several scenes at the hospital, refused to speak to nurses in front of his patients, and basically that everyone knew his evil side. I hear nurses all the time calling him the "freak." It has not been a issue at work. I see how he treats patients and I think I can not believe my mother referred him to me. There is one IN clinic in town but they are not taking patients, but since meeting and working with these docs they have taken in my family and we cause zero problems.

    melissa
  4. Visit  AtlantaRN profile page
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    yes, common. I remember a chronic copd patient, 52, would go out to smoke, and nearly pass out trying to get back to his room for a "stat breathing tx." Pulmonologist had had enough...

    atlantarn
  5. Visit  gr8rnpjt profile page
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    [QUOTE=siri]Thing like: 1. stealing prescription pads and forging names, drugs, etc. 2. altering prescriptions after discharge. 3. Continuously using illegal substances while in the hospital.

    I agree with above. I can think of no other reason that a doctor would fire a patient. To me it is very sad, but in this case, it appears that the reason for the whole family being fired is the money situation. And that is very sad. Hugs to the family going through this, :icon_hug:
  6. Visit  LegalBeagle profile page
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    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    I had never known this could be done before. I've been up on my floor for 1.5 months or so, and seen 2 patients who were fired by their doctors. First one I don't remember the details, really, but one today....his cardiologist fired him (gave him 4 weeks notice) for chronic noncompliance. (39y.o., coke addict, 2 past MI's).

    I never knew this could happen. Another nurse said they can do that, but if he becomes inpatient, htey have to see him even if he's fired, b/c this is not a private hospital, but they don't have to see him in the office if they don't want to. This is a large hospital, we have 2 cardiology groups, so its not like there are no other cardiologists to see him.

    Anyways, is this common?



    The amazing part of this whole scenario is that the same patients that are non-compliant are sometimes the same ones who are the first to sue when something bad happens to them. Go figure....
  7. Visit  LegalBeagle profile page
    0
    Quote from mandrews
    I was fired by my doc when I was in nursing school. The office did major hippa violation by calling a friend from Church and telling her about my health status at the time, address, husband and childrens names, etc. I was told there had never been a true class action case yet and they would only be fined $100.00 so I dropped it because I live in a small town with ONE hospital. The doc acts like he has never met me before, and I kill him with kindness.
    When I interviewed with the DON ( friend of mom ) I told her what happened and said It wouldn't be a problem working with him. She told me he had caused several scenes at the hospital, refused to speak to nurses in front of his patients, and basically that everyone knew his evil side. I hear nurses all the time calling him the "freak." It has not been a issue at work. I see how he treats patients and I think I can not believe my mother referred him to me. There is one IN clinic in town but they are not taking patients, but since meeting and working with these docs they have taken in my family and we cause zero problems.

    melissa

    That we will never have to defend this guy. Sooner or later someone will sue him and he will have no allies, no one to understand his side of the story. I suppose this is a good example of the old saw "what goes around comes around".
  8. Visit  rambisisking profile page
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    Quote from AtlantaRN
    yes, common. I remember a chronic copd patient, 52, would go out to smoke, and nearly pass out trying to get back to his room for a "stat breathing tx." Pulmonologist had had enough...

    atlantarn

    I understand some of the reasons stated...stealing script pads, altering scripts etc.
    I am having a little trouble with the doctor deciding who they will treat by who they will have the best sucess with. If a patient needs treatment and they are paying for thier treatment I feel that the physicians part, healers part, is to do what is in their power to do. It is not in a doctor's power to dictate whether a resp. patient smokes. I hope that I don't have to say this but, I of course understand that smoking is counter productive to the treatment that they may be recieving. In any case, and I know there will be feathers ruffled by saying this, The human being needs to be treated, that's our part as the health field. We cannot however fit that human being into the mold that we would like to in order to achieve the results we want.
    I remember having to wheel patients out to smoke after they had a "breathing treatment"...and In the old old days, they would just take them off of the IPPB machine and they could light up right there in their hospital room.
    We, nurses, doctors and other health care professionals have to try to find the right way to administer care to a patient. Of course, teaching has to be there, but I have a hard time with the attitude of " You do it the way I want you to do it or I will not be the one helping you. I am more and more convinced that we have truly forgotten that we are all part of the whole and not only connected to each other but also responsible for each other. If you can't look at the whole human being and deal with all of them then at least refer them to someone that can.
  9. Visit  Rohan profile page
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    We have physicians fire patients for being repeatedly rude to staff and for noncompliance fairly often.
  10. Visit  BETSRN profile page
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    Quote from rambisisking
    my first thought was ... what on earth would be a good reason to fire a patient. I could think of only a few...they became physically violent, they threatened you or your family or your staff, It's hard to think of more. I have heard the word non-compliance mentioned, Can you imagine a nurse firing a patient for not listening. Please tell me what is a good reason to drop a patient from your care, There must be reasons that would make sense, I hope. There is just something about the very sound of it that brings up the word WRONG in my head.
    Non-compliance is a major reason that docs site for "firing" someone out of a practice. Some patients are so confrontational that it is dangerous to have them in the practice, as they are a liability. One of our practices had an OB patient like that and after she delivered (and gave everyone grief all along before, during and after the birth), the group decided collectively to fire her out of the practice (after her 6 week check-up).
  11. Visit  barefootlady profile page
    0
    I read your post with interest and understanding, I feel that my hubby was fired by a cardiologist. We have since found a better one, a better family physician, and changed our outlook on ER care. Sometimes an incident like this one is really best for everyone. I will pray for your hubby and you.
  12. Visit  mattsmom81 profile page
    0
    I've seen specialist docs refuse to accept patients in the hospital setting, but the GP group on call is expected to see all patients admitted, regardless of how they feel about them.

    Once a patient was abusive to a cardiologist and he said "I don't have to take this and I don't have to accept you as a patient. Goodbye." Dontcha wish we could do that.....? LOL!!
  13. Visit  barefootlady profile page
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    Neither my hubby nor myself were abusive to this cardiologist, he is not very well liked in the nursing community, he is a decent cardiologist but he is very curt when speaking to patients and staff, he is driven by money, and he has been involved in a shady deal or two. I have had several nurse friends from the old days tell me hubby was better off without this guy. My hubby has a few quirks with his meds, he takes a little more hands on care, a little more attention to details, this cardiologist is like a breeze, he comes in spits out a few sentences, hates to answer questions and leaves. I know of 3 nurses who refused to allow him to care for their family members because they felt he has a lousey bedside manner and their loved one needed a little more TLC than he is known to give.

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