Doctors "firing" patients - page 2

I had never known this could be done before. I've been up on my floor for 1.5 months or so, and seen 2 patients who were fired by their doctors. First one I don't remember the details, really, but one today....his cardiologist... Read More

  1. 0
    My heart just broke reading this. I'm sorry this happened to you. It would be appropriate for you to expect an explanation of why they fired your family. My first thought was that he didn't actually do the firing, that it was his office manager or billing manager.

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  2. 0
    Quote from rambisisking
    my first thought was ... what on earth would be a good reason to fire a patient. i could think of only a few...they became physically violent, they threatened you or your family or your staff, it's hard to think of more. i have heard the word non-compliance mentioned, can you imagine a nurse firing a patient for not listening. please tell me what is a good reason to drop a patient from your care, there must be reasons that would make sense, i hope. there is just something about the very sound of it that brings up the word wrong in my head.
    thing like: 1. stealing prescription pads and forging names, drugs, etc. 2. altering prescriptions after discharge. 3. continuously using illegal substances while in the hospital.

    siri, crnp, clnc, rlnc
  3. 0
    I'm sorry that this has happened to you nursejoey. Be professional when you see him. It's really possible that he didn't want to fire you, but his wife made the decision, and maybe sent the letter without his knowledge, or at least under duress. I can imagine the scene at that house that weekend. :chuckle

    I hope that you are getting good care from your new providers.

    One thing that I would guard against is, and you probably aren't going to like this, I would be careful who you tell this story to, especially if you are in a small town/city. People talk. It sounds like you've told a lot of people already, and it's going to get back to that doctor and the ramifications may not be good for you especially since you are going in to nursing school. Please, I'm not trying to be mean, but limit the amount of people who know about this until you get further information. Someone had posted about sending a letter saying, "I understand that you have fired me, I would like to know the rationale behind it." I suggest that you do this. I'm with you in that his wife was probably behind it, if he was saying "don't worry about the bill", things like that. Some docs have big hearts, but some have a wife as an office manager and don't see eye to eye with their spouse on some things, like compassion.

    I wish you the very best, nursejoey! I wish the best for your husband, and I know that you'll make a great nurse one day. Weather this storm with professionalism, and you'll be just fine.
  4. 0
    Rest assured, ladies. I have gone out of my way not to tell people about this. Like I said, I have only told the people that have point blank asked me. I had to give a reason, or else we look like drug seekers or something like that. Plus I didn't want a potential new provider to not give us care based on an assumption that we must have done something to "deserve" to be fired. Oh, BTW, we received that certified firing letter on Monday, I was out there in person Tuesday morning a paid the bill in full. The office staff acted like they didn't know a thing, and I didn't even say a thing to them. Then when we received the certified letter about the bill, I wrote to the attorney and told him that I had paid what the doc's office told me was due before he had even written that letter. Of course, the doctor's office came up with some additional charges, and I had to pay those, but after the lawyer heard the whole story, he wrote off his attorney fees so I didn't have to pay them. The whole thing stinks, INHO, but we do like our new doctor. First thing he said was "just because someone tells you that you have a disease and you are going to live X amount of time, doesn't mean it's true. Just statistics." Our other doc was like "let's just keep you comfortable". I like the new doc's attitude (although I think it is hard to argue with Mayo Clinic
  5. 0
    First, let me say that my heart goes out to you nursejoey. What a terrible thing to happen while you're trying to support your husband, go to school and raise a family!

    Second, there are some valid reasons that patients get 'fired' that have been previously posted (non-compliance with treatments, drug seeking behavior etc.).
    But I'm here to give you other, not so valid reasons...
    Having worked in and around the insurance industry for years, I can tell you that patients get fired for financial and legal issues.

    I've seen physicians fire patients when they're nearing their insurance cap (by their own estimates) knowing that they won't be able to get reimbursed over Medicare/Medicaid rates once that caps reached.

    I've also seen it happen when physicians try experimental/unproven treatments, procedures +/or medications to avoid a lawsuit. For example, they have their patients try a new drug (or more commonly, off label use of an existing drug), usually being vague about the newness, potential side effects, efficacy etc., then they later find out about side effects or complications of the drug. Instead of working with the patient, they 'fire' them (usually citing non-compliance) to avoid being sued.

    Lastly, as in your case nursejoey, I've seen some cowardly physicians fire patients who are terminal either because they can't stand losing a patient or, more likely they are afraid for their reputation.

    Of course, the situations described above are unethical, but I'm sad to say that I've seen it happen...
  6. 0
    I was fired by my doc when I was in nursing school. The office did major hippa violation by calling a friend from Church and telling her about my health status at the time, address, husband and childrens names, etc. I was told there had never been a true class action case yet and they would only be fined $100.00 so I dropped it because I live in a small town with ONE hospital. The doc acts like he has never met me before, and I kill him with kindness.
    When I interviewed with the DON ( friend of mom ) I told her what happened and said It wouldn't be a problem working with him. She told me he had caused several scenes at the hospital, refused to speak to nurses in front of his patients, and basically that everyone knew his evil side. I hear nurses all the time calling him the "freak." It has not been a issue at work. I see how he treats patients and I think I can not believe my mother referred him to me. There is one IN clinic in town but they are not taking patients, but since meeting and working with these docs they have taken in my family and we cause zero problems.

    melissa
  7. 0
    yes, common. I remember a chronic copd patient, 52, would go out to smoke, and nearly pass out trying to get back to his room for a "stat breathing tx." Pulmonologist had had enough...

    atlantarn
  8. 0
    [QUOTE=siri]Thing like: 1. stealing prescription pads and forging names, drugs, etc. 2. altering prescriptions after discharge. 3. Continuously using illegal substances while in the hospital.

    I agree with above. I can think of no other reason that a doctor would fire a patient. To me it is very sad, but in this case, it appears that the reason for the whole family being fired is the money situation. And that is very sad. Hugs to the family going through this, :icon_hug:
  9. 0
    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    I had never known this could be done before. I've been up on my floor for 1.5 months or so, and seen 2 patients who were fired by their doctors. First one I don't remember the details, really, but one today....his cardiologist fired him (gave him 4 weeks notice) for chronic noncompliance. (39y.o., coke addict, 2 past MI's).

    I never knew this could happen. Another nurse said they can do that, but if he becomes inpatient, htey have to see him even if he's fired, b/c this is not a private hospital, but they don't have to see him in the office if they don't want to. This is a large hospital, we have 2 cardiology groups, so its not like there are no other cardiologists to see him.

    Anyways, is this common?



    The amazing part of this whole scenario is that the same patients that are non-compliant are sometimes the same ones who are the first to sue when something bad happens to them. Go figure....
  10. 0
    Quote from mandrews
    I was fired by my doc when I was in nursing school. The office did major hippa violation by calling a friend from Church and telling her about my health status at the time, address, husband and childrens names, etc. I was told there had never been a true class action case yet and they would only be fined $100.00 so I dropped it because I live in a small town with ONE hospital. The doc acts like he has never met me before, and I kill him with kindness.
    When I interviewed with the DON ( friend of mom ) I told her what happened and said It wouldn't be a problem working with him. She told me he had caused several scenes at the hospital, refused to speak to nurses in front of his patients, and basically that everyone knew his evil side. I hear nurses all the time calling him the "freak." It has not been a issue at work. I see how he treats patients and I think I can not believe my mother referred him to me. There is one IN clinic in town but they are not taking patients, but since meeting and working with these docs they have taken in my family and we cause zero problems.

    melissa

    That we will never have to defend this guy. Sooner or later someone will sue him and he will have no allies, no one to understand his side of the story. I suppose this is a good example of the old saw "what goes around comes around".


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