Do you wear gloves - page 7

Sorry I have so many questions but you guys are so helpful. I was woundering do you wear gloves most of the time, like when taking blood, giving injections etc. I remeber being in a hospital and... Read More

  1. by   Magicat
    Originally posted by OrthoNutter
    I never wear gloves when starting IVs or taking blood because I too, can't feel the veins properly, especially if they're a hard stick. My thought is that gloves are not going to protect me from a needlestick anyway...it's not like they're made of industrial strength steel. :P But for all other jobs, the gloves are always there. A pair always lives in my pocket "just in case".
    I was discussing this thread with a colleague of mine, tonight, and she virtually said the same thing. And I agree. If you are gonna get stuck....
    I keep my hands as intact as possible. If they are not intact, ie: cracked and dry from all the washing and the cold... I will use the medium glove to start an IV. But otherwise, no gloves for venipuncture. Besides, I can never find large gloves in the room. There aren't that many of us with big hands in our facility. When I find a box, I put some in the pockets.
  2. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by Magicat
    I was discussing this thread with a colleague of mine, tonight, and she virtually said the same thing. And I agree. If you are gonna get stuck....
    I keep my hands as intact as possible. If they are not intact, ie: cracked and dry from all the washing and the cold... I will use the medium glove to start an IV. But otherwise, no gloves for venipuncture. Besides, I can never find large gloves in the room. There aren't that many of us with big hands in our facility. When I find a box, I put some in the pockets.
    The unfortunate part is you don't alway know there is a microscopic opening. Cracks don't have to be obvious.
    Gloves are not about getting stuck. I was indeed stuck through a glove. However you can and I have had my gloves exposed to blood while starting an IV. Please, reconsider. Try a good fitting glove. I really do find there is negligible difference in sensitivity if the glove fits well.
    Your facility is OBLIGATED to provide you with gloves the right size. You should not have to scrounge for ones that fit. The fact that most people do not wear you size is not an excuse for them to skimp.
  3. by   mattsmom81
    I used to whine about being unable to feel a small vein with gloves on...til a neurosurgeon scolded me "If I can do brain surgery with gloves you can surely find a peripheral vein with gloves....just practice."

    He was right. (and I really hate it when docs are right..LOL)

    LOVE the points about all the hospital's environmental toxins and the huge load to our immune system from EVERYTHING in the hospital these days...body fluids, chemicals, bugs and drugs, etc. Those gloves are even more important today from this standpoint.

    And yes, like Uruguay, American docs can be most blase regarding glove wearing, unfortunately.
  4. by   baseline
    I'm surprised that the non-glovers here haven't been questioned by patients. I always glove up, but patients will still talk about it and they take note of those caregivers who do not. They have a right to be protected from us also......Just a thought. If you take care of me.....gloves.....and wash your hands please!!! I can't say that one enough.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Right-O, baseline!
  6. by   mario_ragucci
    If you want gloves on, then say you want gloves. If I came in to take a blood pressure and a oh sat on a patient and they barked at me to wear gloves, I would put them on.
    Still, no one has really gave subjective material as to how not wearing gloves can harm you in a casual way. Like, does touching door handles count? Seriously, what is a practical scenario of a "family member" picking up something from the hospital. I heard most nurses have mrsa in their nose. Is that true? Lol. Oh!
  7. by   Aussienurse2
    I had an mrsi in my legs, mild but still a worry, got in through a nick when shaving my legs. Now I wax! Probably shaken off bed linens, I don't know, but now am maniacle about gloving and NO shaking out the bed linens. I glove to shower, to make beds, to take bed pans/urinals, to take BSL's, to do everything. I protect myself and my clients in this way. If a client objects I just tell them that it is for their own protection as well as my own.

    I don't get paid enough to put my life at risk.
  8. by   Aussienurse2
    I had an mrsi in my legs, mild but still a worry, got in through a nick when shaving my legs. Now I wax! Probably shaken off bed linens, I don't know, but now am maniacle about gloving and NO shaking out the bed linens. I glove to shower, to make beds, to take bed pans/urinals, to take BSL's, to do everything. I protect myself and my clients in this way. If a client objects I just tell them that it is for their protection as well as my own.

    I don't get paid enough to put my life at risk.
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    AussieNurse, when those bed linens you talked about got shook up, do you thihk you got any mirsa in your nasal cavity? Only one right answer.
    a. yes
    b. no
    c. I don't know
    d. mirsa can not colonize in your nose

    You don't have to answer. No osmotic pressure from me. :-)
  10. by   Flo1216
    I am a petite person and have very small hands and very few floors carry small gloves. The gloves are way too big for me and when I am doing a dressing, I often times have to remove my gloves because I have all of this extra finger space and they get caught in the tape and stuff. The sterile gloves fit better but if it's not a sterile procedure you get yelled at for wasting them. I keep meaning to get myself a box of small gloves, but I never do. Someone please yell at me.
  11. by   abrenrn
    Please note: clean gloves are personal protective equipment (PPE) - they protect the wearer, not the patient. It is a bad idea to think clean gloves are any cleaner than the hands that put them on (or, come to think of it, any hands that reached into box before). Only sterile gloves (put on with sterile technique) protect the patient.

    Just thought I'd clarify that.

    Also, latex is highly allergenic, becoming a big health risk for nurses and other health care providers.
  12. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by abrenrn
    they protect the wearer, not the patient. Only sterile gloves (put on with sterile technique) protect the patient.
    whoa - if this is true, then what about all the people who said they want gloves on to protect themselves and their loved ones? Imagine going to a hospital or health care facility and wanting people to wear gloves to protect them from you? Why would you even be in the place? Being immuno-surpressed is one thing, but the only boy in the bubble i know is John Travola from a 70's made for TV movie. I'm sorry :-(
  13. by   abrenrn
    Uh, Mario, you should be sorry. If you think I dropped a bomb, there is much more for you to learn.
    When you go to a hospital, the nurses wear clean gloves to protect themselves from you and all other patients. Handwashing protects the patient - and you and your loved ones as well.

    I started nursing school in 1985, just when HIV was scaring everyone, just as the CDC was implementing universal precautions. Before that time, it was rare to wear clean gloves to draw blood, etc. and it took patients a while to accept it. Good handwashing was all that was suggested. It remains suggested - since clean gloves are pulled out from a box, they will contain any microbes that are on your hands.

    You may want to read up on personal protective equipment, how and especially why it is used.

    BTW, I have also worked in Bone Marrow Transplantation and met a number of patients who lived, temporarily, in just such bubbles. None of the units I worked on had anyone with John Travolta's diagnosis in the movie (SCIDS - severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome is its name I believe - BMT was originally "invented" for this disease to get such people out of bubbles), but many had severely compromised immune systems until their graft took.
    Last edit by abrenrn on Nov 12, '02

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