Do you wear gloves - page 3

Sorry I have so many questions but you guys are so helpful. I was woundering do you wear gloves most of the time, like when taking blood, giving injections etc. I remeber being in a hospital and... Read More

  1. by   KarafromPhilly
    I try to think carefully about when I put gloves on--e.g. I won't wear them to empty a bedpan full of urine. Yucky, but probably not potentially infectious. I'm nervous about developing a latex allergy, and I don't think multiple unnecessary exposures are a good thing. I WASH MY HANDS and use Eucerin, which is great stuff.
  2. by   tattooednursie
    I am guilty of not gloving up sometimes, but only when I know that I am not going to run into any bodily fluids. If there is a change of getting body fluids on my hands then yes.

    Ewwww doing paricare without gloves is just NASTY!
  3. by   ?burntout
    Originally posted by shannonRN
    yes, yes, and yes...my philosophy...better safe than sorry.
    Ditto for me!

    I will admit-sometimes I do not don the gloves when I do a FSBS -I know, I know; or doing a saline (or heplock) lock flush that is peripheral.
  4. by   DF-LPN
    when i first started working in the nursing home (1986) we didn't have gloves, or if we did they were the type you use to get for dying hair....which got holes as soon as you put them on. universal percautions at are facility started in '89' which was the year i started lpn school. so basically im p-poor at wearing gloves. i do accuchecks and shots without them have emptied bedpans without them also and changed wet briefs without gloves. years ago we had fingercots for supp. hated them but always wore them and now i wear gloves. i wear my gloves for supp, drsg changes, cleaning up stool or emesis, or applying any creams or oint, giving eye gtts, and gloves for bld draws with one finger of the glove ripped off to feel the veins. i've been fortunate enough not to stick myself with dirty needles (knock on wood). i'm a deff canidate of the do as i tell you not as i do
    just my choice i guess, but i have hands that testify to my freg of hand washing. and i believe us older nurses wash our hands better because we never use to have gloves. i watch some of these new ppl and am appalled at how they rush through hand washing and the ones who double glove because they don't have time to wash between patients

    ok i think i've whined enough for now LOL

    Dee
  5. by   melissa24
    Nurse Ratched,

    This was a great quote and worth repeating...

    Any boss who puts a few dollars for gloves ahead of my health should quickly decide whether or not they want to use a barrier when they kiss my arse... [/QUOTE]

    I am with most of you...I probably don't wear them as often as I should, but I definitely wear them for IV starts, drawing blood, etc...
  6. by   globalRN
    Originally posted by KP RN
    I always wear gloves whenever I might be in contact with blood or body fluids.
    I remember, back in the early 1980s, getting my a-s reamed at work for wearing gloves when cleaning up a patient's poop. Back then, us nurses were told to NEVER wear gloves when cleaning up someone cause it can hurt their feelings!!
    =======================================
    KPRN, that was also what I was taught in nursing school...we had to do pericare without gloves and with a small nondisposable hand towel...GROSS:imbar . It never felt right; when I graduated...I wore gloves for everything!!! I worked for 3 years on an acute medical ward that had a lot of GI bleeds, hepatitis cases etc....when I had a fingerstick on a used sharp that someone had thrown in with the new ones...I tested negative for HbsAg and everything else...don't think they tested for HIV in those days. As time went on, we were validated about wearing gloves. When I learned to start IVs, I wore gloves so it is 'natural' for me to start IVs or perform venipuncture with gloves on. It's just a matter of learning a good habit right from the start....and it didn't affect my IV skills negatively at all. In fact, I usually carry a pair of gloves in my pocket (BoyScout ready); that's also what I used to advise my students too. If there is any a-s reaming out done....it's for NOT taking the appropriate precautions. How times change!
  7. by   globalRN
    Originally posted by KP RN
    I always wear gloves whenever I might be in contact with blood or body fluids.
    I remember, back in the early 1980s, getting my a-s reamed at work for wearing gloves when cleaning up a patient's poop. Back then, us nurses were told to NEVER wear gloves when cleaning up someone cause it can hurt their feelings!!
    =======================================
    KPRN, that was also what I was taught in nursing school...we had to do pericare without gloves and with a small nondisposable hand towel...GROSS:imbar . It never felt right; when I graduated...I wore gloves for everything!!! I worked for 3 years on an acute medical ward that had a lot of GI bleeds, hepatitis cases etc....when I had a fingerstick on a used sharp that someone had thrown in with the new ones...I tested negative for HbsAg and everything else...don't think they tested for HIV in those days. As time went on, we were validated about wearing gloves. When I learned to start IVs, I wore gloves so it is 'natural' for me to start IVs or perform venipuncture with gloves on. It's just a matter of learning a good habit right from the start....and it didn't affect my IV skills negatively at all. In fact, I usually carry a pair of gloves in my pocket (BoyScout ready); that's also what I used to advise my students too. If there is any a-s reaming out done....it's for NOT taking the appropriate precautions. How times change!
  8. by   night owl
    I wear them for everything except putting on Tega derm or Op-site...Just can't peel off the darn paper with those darn gloves...then I briskly wash my hands of course.
  9. by   Patsfan
    The only people I touch without gloves are my family members!!! Universal precautions are mandatory where I work and grounds for dismissal if you don't wear gloves. The hospital doesn't want to take care of you when you contract aids, hep c etc.
  10. by   jennirn
    I, too, always waer gloves when possibility of dealing with bodily fluids, and bums definately have that possibility.
  11. by   CaliNurse
    Originally posted by KarafromPhilly
    I try to think carefully about when I put gloves on--e.g. I won't wear them to empty a bedpan full of urine. Yucky, but probably not potentially infectious. I'm nervous about developing a latex allergy, and I don't think multiple unnecessary exposures are a good thing. I WASH MY HANDS and use Eucerin, which is great stuff.
    Kara, Do you really think that a bedpan full of urine is not potentially infectious?????

    It is highly infectious. We, as health care workers do not know what is in any blood or body fluid unless it is cultured. If there are no active signs or enough active signs the doctor will not culter.

    We are at high risk of transmitting and obtaining infectious organism by providing basic ADL care to our patients.

    Gloves are NOT 100% effective in stopping the transmission of infections, however it reduces our risk greatly.

    Urine is a body fluid. This is Standard Precautions. We use Standard Precautions with everyone including co-workers.

    I have heard of a few female nurses who obtained MRSA because they did not wash there hands or did not wash long enough. There organism site was there peri-area. Of course they wiped when they used the restroom and contaminated themselves.

    Please wear gloves. You put yourself at risk, you put your family at risk and believe it or not you put your co-workers at risk.

    To they others who state they were gloves to give injections. This is not required unless you are in an isolation room. If you are giving an injection your risk is the needle will penetrate your skin if not handled properly. A glove will not stop it from penetrating your skin.

    We (health care providers) often transmit infectious organism and create more work for ourselves. When you walk down the hallway and see the isolation carts some of those are created by US, and it is time consuming to put the isolation garb on and off all day long everytime you need to go into the room.

    We can really learn from each other. By reading this I can see why it is so difficult for me to get my older nurses to wear gloves. If "back in their day" they were not taught and encourage to wear gloves then it certainly is a case of retraining our minds to think of it.

    Cali
  12. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by CaliNurse


    I have heard of a few female nurses who obtained MRSA because they did not wash there hands or did not wash long enough. There organism site was there peri-area. Of course they wiped when they used the restroom and contaminated themselves.

    Please wear gloves. You put yourself at risk, you put your family at risk and believe it or not you put your co-workers at risk.

    To they others who state they were gloves to give injections. This is not required unless you are in an isolation room. If you are giving an injection your risk is the needle will penetrate your skin if not handled properly. A glove will not stop it from penetrating your skin.


    You said it. I worked in a lab for a while. We always doubled gloved. Changed gloves periodocally througout the day. and washed before leaveing the lab. Then when we went into the rest room we would was agin before using the toilet.

    In a lab you keep gloves on constantly. At least nurses get to take them off for periods of time. In the lab you only take them off to change them, and put another back on.

    I have sever latex sensitivity. I use non latex gloves. There have been studies done that show that even folks like myself can use latex if they have no powder. I agree with that up to a point (based on personal experience). However if I wear latex all the time I have a problem powder or not. Your employer is required to provide non allergy producing gloves, if you need it.

    There is a lot of debate about non latex vs latex. All I can say is for MOST of the reasons we wear golves the arguements don't wash

    I used to have a problem with touch sensitivity like many of you. Then I learned that if I just put my golves on over time I have learned that I CAN feel as well as I need to with any gloves. I do venipuncture with gloves on now. I learned the trick to sensitivity is a well fitted glove. Wear the correct size for you. Glove that are too big, reduce touch sensitivity for me.

    There are many different types of non latex gloves. Our facility has gone to all non latex. They are using a glove (sorry don't remenber the brand) that has Aloe vera in the glove. EVERYONE who slips them on the first time loves them and loves how their hands feel. Visitors who must glove up comment they like them. (Personallly I don't think they do much for my hands) They do feel very very smooth inside and I have excellent sensitivity with them. They are as streatchy as I need and as thin and flexible as I need. Graned some types don't streatch or flex, some are too thick, weak, etc. These don't seem to degrade like latex and some synthetics. You know like when you pull the glove out of the box and 25 are stuck together, You cant get the glove on because you cant peel them open, or when you put them on they tear as you are doing it or later. We have experiemnted with a lot of golves and found these to be the best. I don't know what they cost. But we are a very bottom line type of facility and if we can cut cost we will.

    I used to have some of the same excuses for not wearing golves plus the one that I am allergic. No more.

    My husband (not a nurse) washes his hands before going to bath room and is disgusted as to why people do not do this. He feels there is more danger in not washing before than after. I did not teach him this (He's always done it) and he is in no way a compulsive hand washer.

    The point of gloves not protecting you from a stick. Yea, I still have the immage from a couple years back of my gloved right hand and a needle stuck in it.

    I know back in the early 90's when I was a specimin processor in a lab that there were experiments going on with a chainmail type of glove that was worn under the latex to prevent this. Don't know what ever came of it. You know there are things like Kevlar that mayby might work when dealing with sharps. I wonder what work is going on in this direction.
    Last edit by Agnus on Oct 19, '02
  13. by   nakitamoon
    Wash my hands,,,, wear gloves,,,, wash my hands,,,, wear gloves,,,, wash my hands,,,,,

    When I read the title to this thread my first thought was,,,, who wouldn't,,,, plz those of you who don't,,,, take time to put them on,,,,

    As shannonRN said,,,, better to be safe than sorry,,,,

    ~kitamoon

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