Do you think the Boards really mean your competent? - page 6

What was your experience taking the boards?:eek:... Read More

  1. by   RoaminHankRN
    I think the "real" education begins in the hospital. So what if you can write a research paper... the real question is can you start an IV or recognize and treat a lethal arrythmia? You don't need a BSN for that. As I have said all along... what about mandatory CEU's. Why aren't more nurses pushing for this???? Everyone gets in a big stink over boards, diploma vs ADN/BSN. But what standards are out there that insure we know what we are doing one year or ten years out of school?
  2. by   Q.
    I think that by limiting yourself to any one venue; be it strictly hospital or strictly classroom, you are limiting your knowledge and learning abilities.
    Experience and education, the ability to know what you don't know, and the realization that there is more out there than what you've been exposed to, is REAL education.
  3. by   Q.
    Originally posted by RoaminHankRN
    I So what if you can write a research paper... the real question is can you start an IV or recognize and treat a lethal arrythmia?
    I can't recognize and treat a lethal arrythmia, as I am a Labor and Delivery nurse. Based on your logic, where does that leave me?

  4. by   4XNURSE
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Hi - just had to add my opinion.

    I don't think the boards mean you are a great nurse;.....

    I think the boards are meant to demonstrate a minimum level of competence; .....

    Finally, I believe that learning never stops.....

    There is so much more out there.


    I couldn't agree more.

    I taught for 2.5 years at a "for profit" LVN school. Their stated goal was to prepare their graduates with "...the minimum entry level...." I took their book, with that statement, to each class on their first day. I told my new students I wouldn't settle for them to meet the minimum . They had to be the BEST they could achieve.

    just my $ .02

    ken
  5. by   Q.
    I knew I liked you.

    Not only do you have my father's name, but we think alike.
  6. by   lever5
    Bedazzled,
    I have been surfing this website for many years. I do not post a lot until recently. It took a lot to go through the process and it tends to cut me loose once in a while. I have moved and had different handles. This one is a combo of my first and last name. Having 2-3 hundred posts does not make you smarter or more valuable. As I have found out in online classes, written words hurt more than spoken ones. You really can't take them back. So swing at the idea the writer states, not the writer. It can be a lot of fun creating controversy. As I read through the posts, your ideas are the same as a lot of the posters. We are here to confirm that we are not alone. Gee, I wish they had a spell checker on this site.
    Linda
  7. by   hummingbird1
    I took my boards in 1985 over a 2 day period, four exams 90 minutes per session. Then we had to wait for 3 months to find out whether or not we passed. The waiting was terrible. I passed on my first try. My orientation time was just 5 weeks since I was employed at the hospital that I did my clinical practicum. I must tell you that I went to a 3 year diploma school and I loved it.
    I am finishing my BSN in June and then it is off the graduate school in June too. I've been busy over the years raising my family and I am enjoying learning new things.

    I find it unfortunate that our new grads are not at the level that I would expect from a new grad. This is due to the community focussed education experience from the colleges/universities in my area. I think nursing education needs to re evaluate our med/surg teaching environment, length of practicle application of the nursing process. I believe that a solid foundation in med/surg will prepare you for any discipline in the nursing profession whether it is in the acute/home care setting.
  8. by   RoaminHankRN
    Originally posted by Susy K


    I can't recognize and treat a lethal arrythmia, as I am a Labor and Delivery nurse. Based on your logic, where does that leave me?


    What about decels?
  9. by   nilepoc
    Fourty five minutes and 75 questions, I was disapointed to take a test that I felt I could have passd with common sense and a good patho class. Its a good thing nursing is mostly OJT.
  10. by   Q.
    Originally posted by RoaminHankRN



    What about decels?
    Good comeback, but arguably, decels are not really considered a lethal arrythmia. SOME decels are even expected.

  11. by   Agnus
    No nure is going to know it all. When we come out of school we have usually had enough basics in all areas to start as a beginner nurse training in any area.

    When you've been out of school a while you forget some basics because you are working in an area where you don't use all the knowledge you leave schoo with.

    Remember Brenner said something to the effect that when ever you change areas of practice you are starting all over aver again as a beginner.

    Someone here memtioned that we limit ourselves by working just hospital or just community. Yes, but I for one am only one person and have not figured out how to work in every speciality at once and be expert at everything. Many skills are transferable but every area has things that are unique to it. I know a psyc nurse who will tell you she can't start an IV. A med a cardiac nurse does not need to understand fetal monitoring but she better know cariac monitoring. Don't ask me what an 8 year old child's HR should be. But I bet any Peids nurse will know. Nursing is too complicated today. Long gone are the days when a nuse could work any area without retraining. Remember those days nursing practice was more limited and so was our body of knowledge.
    Last edit by Agnus on Feb 28, '02
  12. by   Flynnstone
    Originally posted by Agnus
    No nure is going to know it all. When we come out of school we have usually had enough basics in all areas to start as a beginner nurse training in any area.
    .......Long gone are the days when a nuse could work any area without retraining. Remember those days nursing practice was more limited and so was our body of knowledge.
    _________________________________________

    So, true. I am a peds nurse with home care, ER, acute and long term care experience. I feel competent as a pediatric nurse but if you asked me to work a shift on an adult med-surg floor I would have a heart attack!!! I don't know the first thing.....

    Nurses specialize, just like other professionals do. It is time that this be recognized. I worked in a hospital where they would float the peds nurses into the hospital attached nursing home if our census was low and they were short staffed!!! They refused to understand that we were not familiar with the drugs, dosages or even the assessment of the elderly!

    Even some of our own nursing colleagues refuse to acknowledge that we are independent practitioners!!! We have our own license that can and will be revoked for poor professional performance. Some nurses are still of the mindset that they are just doing what the doctor ordered! This blows my mind!!!! I believe that constitutes incompetence! We must be accountable for our own actions. If we expect to be protected by doctors and hospital administration then we are giving up our own authority, our own autonomy our own adulthood! Little children are not judged by their own actions because they don't know any better. (Society looks at a bratty 4 year old and blames the parents, not the child) So too for nurses who believe that "the doctor said so" is a justified reason for doing anything.

    Anyway, I'm ranting and raving and getting off topic....but I feel much better

  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Agnus

    Someone here memtioned that we limit ourselves by working just hospital or just community. Yes, but I for one am only one person and have not figured out how to work in every speciality at once and be expert at everything.
    That was me that said that, and in all fairness, you took it out of context. I stated by limiting yourself to any one venue - such as strictly hospital (experience) or strictly classroom (theory) you are limiting yourself. I was saying that in retort to the common argument of experience counts for everything.

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