Do you need an order to give the flu vaccine? - page 3

by MikeyBSN 11,307 Views | 24 Comments

I think the obvious answer to my question is "yes". However, I have seen and read about pharmacies, grocery stores and other places giving flu shots. I assume they are being given by an RN or LPN. However, I doubt all these... Read More


  1. 0
    In Texas you have to be licensed to give injections. RNs are automatically licensed with their valid nursing license; LVNs (vocational nurse) have to re-apply for the right to give shots every year, thus just being an LVN does not give them the automatic right to give shots even if their license is current. I suppose certain doctors are licensed, and others are not, depending on their specific license. Licensed psychologists PhDs technically can, PhDs in counseling cannot (unless you are in Florida). I think MDs can, and research doctors even in medicine cannot. I don't know about pharmacists here. Even if you are licensed to do so, you still have to stay within your scope of practice, so even being licensed does not necessarily grant you the right to do so. It's a scary thought, but I suppose there are people out there administering shots that are not legally allowed to, licensed and not (expired licenses). I think sometimes licenses only allow you to do it in certain states, where you are licensed, and not nationally or across state borders. NPs (nurse practitioners) can write Rx under a supervising doctors license, thus have blanket rights to make medication decisions without consulting their supervising doctor by association.
    Last edit by mokiach on Oct 7, '10 : Reason: correction
  2. 0
    I'm on an inpatient psych unit, so this may not apply to you. We have to screen everyone for the flu vaccine. If they're over 50 or meet certain criteria (chronic illness, at risk population, live in a nursing home) and they want the vaccine, an order automatically generates without a doctor's order. If a patient wants it and they don't meet the criteria to auto-generate the order, our physician has given standing orders to administer it as long as the patient doesn't have allergies to latex or eggs. We have to write a verbal order for it, she'll sign it when she gets on the unit, and we have to write in the order that they aren't allergic to eggs and whether or not they're allergic to latex.
  3. 0
    I got a flu shot yesterday at my clinical site for nursing school. The hospital was having a health fair with free shots to the employees, and since we were "working" there that day, we got them, too. All we had to do was be over 18 (of course), sign a form that asked some simple questions about allergies, etc., and then sign to give consent. Oh, and the shot was given to me by a fellow nursing student!
    I don't know if this has any effect on the issue or not, but there was no doctor's order, and the shot was not given by a nurse (RN or otherwise), MD, or even a pharmacist.
  4. 0
    Quote from brighella
    As a corporate flu shot nurse, i can say that theres no order required. They need to meet requirements and not have any of the contraindications, answer the questions, and then sign a form which is both a consent and a release from liability. Its important for the nurse to screen well, and we carry smelling salts and doses of epi for if the unthinkable does occur. I gave over 150 shots today and into 4 digits this season so far, and while ive had a good number tell me 'my doctor said I should get it' I have yet to see any kind of directive from a doc.

    I didn't know that pharmacists could give injections too, I guess i thought nurses & docs were the only ones who could drive a syringe like that, good to know!
    This string is a bit old but as an Occupational RN in the manufacturing sector, I have the same question. What must I do to 1) acquire inactivated 2011-12 vaccine, 2) go to get appropriate release forms and 3) record or report/document administration of the flu vaccine. I am registered in the State of Florida.
    Thanks!
  5. 0
    Quote from mokiach
    in texas you have to be licensed to give injections. rns are automatically licensed with their valid nursing license; lvns (vocational nurse) have to re-apply for the right to give shots every year, thus just being an lvn does not give them the automatic right to give shots even if their license is current. i suppose certain doctors are licensed, and others are not, depending on their specific license. licensed psychologists phds technically can, phds in counseling cannot (unless you are in florida). i think mds can, and research doctors even in medicine cannot. i don't know about pharmacists here. even if you are licensed to do so, you still have to stay within your scope of practice, so even being licensed does not necessarily grant you the right to do so. it's a scary thought, but i suppose there are people out there administering shots that are not legally allowed to, licensed and not (expired licenses). i think sometimes licenses only allow you to do it in certain states, where you are licensed, and not nationally or across state borders. nps (nurse practitioners) can write rx under a supervising doctors license, thus have blanket rights to make medication decisions without consulting their supervising doctor by association.
    i live in texas and have had many vaccinations given by pharmacists.


Top