Do you know how to do CPR well? - page 3

I was wondering..I graduated in May of this year..How important is to know CPR? I know some patients might stop breathing and the nurse has to do CPR on the patient right? I never done CPR on a live... Read More

  1. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Melilem
    When I took my first 8 hour CPR class, I was confused and a little overwhelmed- and very unsure if I was ready to use my new skills on a real person. Of course, we have chosen this profession because we are the type of people who help when we can- so I'm sure I would have at the opportunity. During recertification, I remembered my first class, and I was confident.
    So my reply to the poster is- when the time comes, you will do just fine.
    You know, it would be nice if the Red Cross would make available their training tapes free of charge. I wonder if they do.
    Health professionals are taught AHA guidelines, not Red Cross. RC only teaches bystander for non-professionals.
  2. by   Medic/Nurse
    Yes.

    To clear up some common "misconceptions"

    NO ONE - AHA, ARC conducts "certification" - they conduct courses that meet a prescribed standard (their own, well researched, etc). You do not get certified in BLS, ACLS, PALS - you get a COURSE COMPLETION CARD. I may be a, Licensed Registered Nurse or Board Certified Emergency Nurse or a Nationally Registered Paramedic, but I am not "certified" to do CPR. I took and met the standards for COURSE COMPLETION. "License" and "Certification" are typically reserved for professions operating under some type of authority.

    NEXT, Healthcare facilities can use any organizations "standard" that they want. Whammo! There it is - now does it count? Depends on what counts? I think there is an obvious answer, but... What may count to the facility is the "card". But, rest assured if someone they love were to need your knowledge of CPR - you better bet, they'd want to at least be able to call 911, err... activate the emergency response system (Just Kidding )

    Now, that being said - many states LEGAL licensing/certifying agencies/boards only recognize certain (usually AHA, ARC) providers courses. The other "spot" this get muddled is if the JOINT COMMISSION is involved. But, keep in mind the JCAHCO only holds you, generally, to your own policies.

    ALSO A NOTE - The AHA and ARC, to my knowledge, do not POLICE the CPR industry. If one completed one of "their" courses in some questionable manner. Yep, they will want to know. The "handing" out of "COMPLETION CARDS" is not an acceptable activity. FYI - there was a big "legal" fight some years ago about the "certification" aspect of these entities. The word CERTIFICATION has been eliminated over recent years - but, for those of you OLD enough to remember - you would be correct in noting the language used to be different.

    To the OP: CPR is important. The ability to good CPR is important (important for every level of provider). It is a psycho-motor skill - the base knowledge of the info with the ability to do correct motor skills. Luckily, in most all settings - help is coming. Good CPR (along with early defib) is an key piece of the resuscitation puzzle (the best ACLS in the world does little without a good start). Oh yeah, I'd watch about the "mickey mouse certification" references - there are some sensitive types out there. I took your comment to refer that "nobody FAILS", and on that account you'd be correct.
  3. by   TazziRN
    Okay, let me rephrase.....hospitals in this section of CA require AHA-issued cards. And as long as my card says that it certifies, I consider it a cert.
  4. by   gonzo1
    Eric, my ER serves all ages. And above posters are right of course that most cracked ribs occur on the elderly.
    This thread brings up many good points and hopefullly a lot of people will see it.
  5. by   P_RN
    I took my last course about a month before I retired. It was a total of about 10 minutes.

    For 30+ years it had been an 8h course with written tests, ratios, breaths, compressions, strips etc etc etc.
    " Annie Annie are you all right? "

    That last year for some reason they "taught" what they called heartsaver. They propped the dummy on the edge of the stage in the auditorium, and we had to show where to place our hands and do 5 compressions. That was it.

    I was working in a university medical center, with its own heart hospital.....so they thought duh? BUT I lived an hour away and chances I'd need a little more knowledge at home...at the grocery store etc.

    Wondered what the world was coming to. I guess out here in the boonies Annie won't BE all right.
  6. by   rjflyn
    Quote from Bala Shark
    I was wondering..I graduated in May of this year..How important is to know CPR? I know some patients might stop breathing and the nurse has to do CPR on the patient right? I never done CPR on a live patient before..Was wondering do you have to know CPR very well in order to work? I know you have to have CPR certification but many of those places that certity people are just micky mouse type of certifications..

    Well we generally dont do CPR on live patients. Yeah in some instances we do but for the most part technically they are dead.

    As far as nurses skill at doing CPR no offense but in general if you are not working an area where you do it often we/you are not so good at it. I a few years back as part of the hospitals program where as i was afforded the opportunity to become and maintain my CPR instructor designation I had to do one monthly reverifiction for hospital staff a year. Sadly most nurses unless they worked ER or the ICU- thats all this small hopsital had for critical care didnt do very well. I would have to basically take them by the hand walk them through it once or twice and then let them attempt to check off.
  7. by   vampiregirl
    Quote from TazziRN
    Health professionals are taught AHA guidelines, not Red Cross. RC only teaches bystander for non-professionals.
    Actually, the Red Cross does offer a course geared toward health professionals, "CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer". It covers the same skills as AHA's "BLS for Healthcare Providers". Both the AHA and Red Cross's current CPR classes are based on the ECC 2005 standards.
  8. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from Bala Shark
    I was wondering..I graduated in May of this year..How important is to know CPR? I know some patients might stop breathing and the nurse has to do CPR on the patient right? I never done CPR on a live patient before..Was wondering do you have to know CPR very well in order to work? I know you have to have CPR certification but many of those places that certity people are just micky mouse type of certifications..
    I cannot believe that someone who graduated from a nursing program could ask a question like this.
    Last edit by PANurseRN1 on Aug 29, '06
  9. by   CMarie,RN
    Quote from Bala Shark
    Yea, I dont think ratting out places is good thou..I know a lot of places that are mickey mouse..It is just that they have a lot of people in the class..Maybe it is two instructors with 25 people..The ratio is bad..People get certified regardless..
    I am shocked - my husband (a Lieutenant/Paramedic/Firefighter) teaches First Aid/CPR to Daycare centers when he is not at the fire station. His class (approved by the State of Florida Dept. of Children and Families) is an abbreviated version (specific to Day Care Center environments) and still takes 4 hours to complete (he typically teaches by himself with a class of 10-15). EVERYONE in the class is personally tested on CPR manuevers/technique and he will not give certification until the Day Care Worker can return demonstration with rationale (I have been to many of his classes just to observe - I thought I wanted to be a BLS instructor while in nsg school but it is a very heavy responsibility that I realized I was not ready for). So I find it very hard to believe that anybody could legitimately use the excuse of . . . too many students . . . in the class to justify making a quick buck at the expense of safety and integrity . . . there is no excuse for that. If those instructors cannot properly teach CPR - but pass out certifications like they are candy, then they SHOULD be reported.

    Please find yourself a reputable American Heart Association BLS Class to attend - usually community colleges will offer classes on a regular basis.
  10. by   RGN1
    I spent 9 years nursing and faithfully attended my regultion 3 hour CPR class every year. I too wondered if it would ever actually be any use because I had never "done it for real".

    Well a few months ago it actually happened to me. A patient fully out & out coded in in my ward.

    I tell this story because I want you nurses who don't work in ICU or ER that YOU CAN DO IT!!!!

    We did exactly what we had been taught, even used the automated de-fib as we shouold have (only got it on the ward 2 weeks prior to this incident). None of us had ever seen a real code before but we did it and we did it correctly & we had her back just as the crash team came racing round the corner.
    They were miffed that we'd beaten them to it!

    So please, go to your class, do the best you can to get it right and to remember what you have learned because you may be the one who makes the difference at work or on the street. You never know.

    So don't belittle that training and don't think you can't do it properly just because you don't get to do it for real on a regular basis. I'm living proof that that this training matters!!
  11. by   MrsWampthang
    Quote from NurseErica
    (imagine ept and atropine being "pushed" into a running line without clamping above, etc etc).

    Yeah, I can imagine it, I used to do it all the time when worked in the ER and on the ambulance as a medic. If the line is wide open, (as it is should be during a code) then it is going to run the medication in as fast as you give it, it isn't going to back up in the line for any length of time. Yes, I know in school they teach you to clamp when giving meds, and you should continue doing that, however, don't be surprised if, in a code situation, you see meds pushed without the line being clamped.

    Pam
  12. by   RunnerRN
    Quote from Traumamama59
    Yeah, I can imagine it, I used to do it all the time when worked in the ER and on the ambulance as a medic. If the line is wide open, (as it is should be during a code) then it is going to run the medication in as fast as you give it, it isn't going to back up in the line for any length of time. Yes, I know in school they teach you to clamp when giving meds, and you should continue doing that, however, don't be surprised if, in a code situation, you see meds pushed without the line being clamped.

    Pam
    As it should be lol. Like I said, this code was a cluster of mistakes, and they still had the fluids kvo. Plus the fluids were hooked to his dialysis access, and everytime someone lowered the bag a little, there was blood backing up. Not really at all
    Regardless, I only do code in the ER now, and always clamp my fluids when giving my meds....it just seems safer to me. But we usually (hopefully) have a tech doing CPR, a nurse pushing meds, a nurse writing the code, etc.
    Thanks for the reply! I love learning more about ER nursing vs "field" treatment, it is amazing the differences that exist (and I have nothing but respect and love for my medics!)
  13. by   mercyteapot
    I just recently got re-certified in an AHA class and the instructor was the worst I'd ever had. His primary concern seemed to have been getting us out of class early. Since I got my original certification when I was in high school 20-plus years ago and have been continually re-certified ever since, I didn't feel like it was a big deal for me personally, but I don't think the newbies in that group are at all qualified to perform CPR. I must say that I do feel this time I do have a Mickey Mouse certification.

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