Do you have to punch a time clock? - page 3

Our hospital recently started using a timeclock, they don't call it this but that's what it is. We have to swipe our id badges at the start and end of our shift. It automatically deducts 30 minutes... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from kontakt
    A LONG time ago, I used to be a factory worker, complete with punch-clocks. Just seeing this aweful device reminds me of those factory days.
    I, too, worked at a factory several years ago and gave them 3 years of my service. Moreover, I am not ashamed of having ever worked at a factory, supermarket, fast food joint, retail outlet, or any of the other places that are considered "working class" or "blue-collar". In my opinion, there is absolutely no reason to feel shame regarding an honest day of work.
  2. by   KellNY
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Then I'm guessing you don't have a Pyxis medication system where you work? Or maybe it's set up differently. Anyway, we scan/swipe our badges to "clock in" at work, and when getting meds out of the Pyxis, we type in our login names and then use a fingerprint scan to verify it's really "us". Frankly I love it: NO ONE can type in as me and get narcs, period.
    As I mentioned before, we don't clock in, but sign a carbon copied triplicate time sheet at the end of 2 weeks.

    We do have a Pyxis, but it's based on password. I type in my 1st initial, full last name, and then am prompted to type in my self chosen password. I'm still the only one who can access meds under my name, and there's no scanning involved.
  3. by   KellNY
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Then I'm guessing you don't have a Pyxis medication system where you work? Or maybe it's set up differently. Anyway, we scan/swipe our badges to "clock in" at work, and when getting meds out of the Pyxis, we type in our login names and then use a fingerprint scan to verify it's really "us". Frankly I love it: NO ONE can type in as me and get narcs, period.
    As I mentioned before, we don't clock in, but sign a carbon copied triplicate time sheet at the end of 2 weeks.

    We do have a Pyxis, but it's based on password. I type in my 1st initial, full last name, and then am prompted to type in my self chosen password. I'm still the only one who can access meds under my name, and there's no scanning involved.
  4. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from kontakt
    We have a regular punch-in/punch-out clock. Our hospital just instituted the use of these unpleasant devices.

    I bitterly protested. A LONG time ago, I used to be a factory worker, complete with punch-clocks. Just seeing this aweful device reminds me of those factory days. I said to management, "I thought that nursing was supposed to be a profession?" (Please, I do not mean to start a "Is Nursing a Profession" discussion.) Management empathized, but said that a few people were "signing" in "on time" when they were actually starting work late. Implementing the punch-clocks is supposedly, meant to keep everyone honest. Supposedly, it will help save money. Interestingly enough, our weak union supports this venture.

    My take??

    I always come to work early. Fifteen minutes early, most days. Additionally, I, quite often, would even start work the moment I set foot on the unit. This could be counting narcs, emptying foley's, hanging meds, checking the telemetry patients, etc., etc., etc. For good or for bad, despite starting work early, I STILL put down the time I was supposed to start (1900, for a 12 hour night shift). Basically, for good or for bad, I was giving 15 minutes of free service to the hospital. This is my time and I do what I wish.

    Well, they want us to punch-in no earlier than 5 minutes before (or 5 minutes after) the shift is supposed to start. So, I can't offically punch-in the time I actually start work.

    I feel like I am getting my hand slapped for the unfortunate actions of a few nurses. I, and many nurses at this facility like me, quite often start work early in order to lend our fellow nurse a hand. This obviously is not recognized with the implementation of the punch-clock. And it feels too "Factory Like". It surely doesn't feel like I am treated professionally.

    UGH. . . .
    Sorry, but IMO, people who do what you do make working conditions worse for everyone. It perpetuates the martyr syndrome that has pagued nurses. No one should be coming in to work and starting their shift off-the-clock. If you have to do that, then maybe you have time-management issues. Managers see people like you coming in and starting off-the-clock and then start expecting others to do the same. And just what would happen if you got caught up in a situation that went badly when you technically weren't supposed to be working? Legally, you could be in the weeds.

    I come to work on time. I don't care about having to swipe in and out. As far as I'm concerned, it keeps everyone "legal." Less likelihood of someone being able to short you on hours.

    Why do nurses get so caught up in this sort of minutiae ("Swiping is unprofessional..." "Patterned scrub tops are unprofessional...," etc.)?
    Don't we have real problems we could be working on?
  5. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I, too, worked at a factory several years ago and gave them 3 years of my service. Moreover, I am not ashamed of having ever worked at a factory, supermarket, fast food joint, retail outlet, or any of the other places that are considered "working class" or "blue-collar". In my opinion, there is absolutely no reason to feel shame regarding an honest day of work.
    Precisely how I feel. Try telling police or firemen they're not professionals because their jobs are "blue-collar."

    Awful lot of resentment on the other poster's part about time that was allegedly donated. I thought donations didn't come with strings or expectations. I guess I was wrong about that.
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from kellny
    as i mentioned before, we don't clock in, but sign a carbon copied triplicate time sheet at the end of 2 weeks.

    we do have a pyxis, but it's based on password. i type in my 1st initial, full last name, and then am prompted to type in my self chosen password. i'm still the only one who can access meds under my name, and there's no scanning involved.
    [font="comic sans ms"]having used both types of pyxis, i prefer the one with the password. the scanners too often have to scan, scan and rescan before they'll let you in, and it's frustrating when you really need something and the scan just won't accept your fingerprint!
  7. by   kontakt
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I, too, worked at a factory several years ago and gave them 3 years of my service. Moreover, I am not ashamed of having ever worked at a factory, supermarket, fast food joint, retail outlet, or any of the other places that are considered "working class" or "blue-collar". In my opinion, there is absolutely no reason to feel shame regarding an honest day of work.

    To be honest, working at this steel factory was one of the best things I ever did for myself. I enjoyed the work and I enjoyed the people I worked with.

    I also worked as a cashier at a Burger King. And worked as a custodian for a 3 apartment complex. And sold home-made baked goods out in the open "Farmer's Market" in New York City.

    I lived and breathed the "working class" and "blue-collar" for many, many years!! LOL!!

    And I hold no shame with my life's history.

    Please understand, though, that nursing is attempting to demonstrate itself as a "profession". Our hospital instituted the punch-in clock ONLY for the healthcare staff (including aides and unit secretaries). The dietary people do not have a punch clock. The radiology techs do not have a punch in clock. The ER doctors, who are ALL employed by the hospital, do not have to "punch in"! The fact that, so far, only the healthcare staff must punch in is highly insulting, in my opinion. Maybe, later on, more of the other department employees will have to "punch in" too. So far, though, this is not the case. Rest assured that the MD's who are employed by the hospital, and have a 12 hour work schedule like I do, will never have to "punch in".

    If there were nursing staff being less than honest to how long a day they were working, why isn't our managment team holding them accountable individually?? Why is the entire nursing staff having our hands slapped for the actions of a few?? And ONLY a few! Because our 32-bed hospital is so small, we all know who these "few" are!! (Folks, this is 32 beds including all departments!) In my mind, this is far from being treated like and acknowledged as a "professional".

    There is no need for a time clock on any department within our small hospital.
  8. by   Hoozdo
    I love the timeclock! My previous employer had no timeclock. You had to call the nursing supervisor if you were leaving after your shift ended and explain why you had to stay. The real clincher - if you were charting you did not get overtime....only comp time! Try taking some comp time in a short staffed MICU :trout: I left with 10 hours of comp time they had to pay me for.

    Those 10 or 15 minutes leaving late to give a complex report add up. Show me the money
  9. by   jjjoy
    Badge swipe or phone call-in; also manually turning in hours worked

    Currently have a "desk" job - not nursing - and STILL have to clock in and out!
  10. by   hikernurse
    We swipe here. I like getting paid for the shifts I get off late. We have an exception notebook we fill out if we didn't take a lunch or forgot to punch in. But we can look up and print the hours we work from a computer--even at home, which is nice.

    We can get marked down for "tardies" on our evaluation if it's a chronic problem, but I haven't heard of it happening. Being late most of the time would bring on some pretty wrathful peer pressure that might be worse than getting dinged on your eval
  11. by   LPNSan
    :smilecoffeeIlovecof we punch a time clock and they take half hour for lunch, but if you do not take it.. you lose it..
  12. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from Ari RN
    We punch in our last 4 digits of our SS # then our fingerprint is scanned. No swiping...... I actually asked one of my coworkers to scan his fingerprint after I punched in my SS # and apparently it didn't work. I sometimes feel violated when the machine scans my print.
    Same here! If we do not clock out for lunch, no matter the reason we did not, we are written up for not clocking out.:angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
  13. by   ElvishDNP
    I clock in & out, always have in my semi-short nursing career. It doesn't bother me really, because I want to get paid for every second that I am there instead of enjoying the comforts of home. We get 30 min automatically taken for lunch but if we don't get a lunch we have a time-exception book that we write in for that.

    There is supposedly some rule that you can't clock in more than 5 min early but I clock in the second I get there, whether it's 1825 or 1844. If I do get there early, I use that time to get started writing my pt info down, getting pens & supplies into appropriate pockets etc. So far there has never been a problem.

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