Do you have to punch a time clock? - page 2

Our hospital recently started using a timeclock, they don't call it this but that's what it is. We have to swipe our id badges at the start and end of our shift. It automatically deducts 30 minutes... Read More

  1. by   Ari RN
    We punch in our last 4 digits of our SS # then our fingerprint is scanned. No swiping...... I actually asked one of my coworkers to scan his fingerprint after I punched in my SS # and apparently it didn't work. I sometimes feel violated when the machine scans my print.
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    I wish we could punch a time clock . . . we have to do everything by hand and it gets very complicated when you start out on med/surg, go to OB and then to ER . . . . . plus one person has to take all the time cards and make sure everyone did their time correctly.

    A big pain.

    steph
  3. by   deehaverrn
    At our hospital all of the "salaried" workers work Monday through Friday with no holidays..so I'd prefer to be salaried if I had the choice.
    One of my points was that it is MORE difficult now to get the right pay because before I was tabulating my pay summary myself and could count every minute..whether it was leaving 10 minutes late or not getting a meal (which is VERY common on my unit). In fact, they even put monitors in our breakroom and not only do they call us when we're on breaks but staff and docs come in looking for us so it is almost impossible to relax at all. Now I get nothing for arriving early (which I don't mind..I'm leaving time for a quick cup of caffiene), but more importantly if I leave 10 minute late every day for the two week time period, that makes 100 minutes, they don't count that time unless I make a notation of it AND the charge nurse goes in to the computer and changes it. There is no way for me to check that this is done. So I need to make sure to write in my calendar EVERY time I leave late so that I can be aware of checking my paycheck. If it is incorrect, payroll won't change it unless and until the nurse manager fills out a paper.
    I guess the thing is this...maybe I wouldn't mind using the time clock IF it actually made sure I got paid for every minute...but it doesn't. 12 minutes a day can add up to alot of time. It seems like there should be some regulation about this too.
  4. by   Myxel67
    When I became a nurse in 1994, the hospital I worked at didn't use a time clock, but we filled out time cards with arrival time and departure time. About a year later the hospital changed to time clocks thinking they would be getting rid of a lot of overtime.

    It worked just the opposite though. When we filled out the cards, many nurses would just put the standard shift time, regardless of time they left. When the clock was installed, the overtime skyrocketed because we were not allowed to clock out until we actually left. Then the push was on to make sure every nurse completed work on time. If we worked 10 minutes late daily for 2 consecutive weeks, we would receive "counseling" in time management--which would affect raise at performance review.

    Now I'm in a salaried position so we clock in, but not out. Basically they don't care how long we stay since they don't have to pay us.

    I had always associated timeclocks with factory work and the blue collar work force. It was a shock to be working in a profession where we were required to punch a clock.
    Last edit by Myxel67 on Feb 12, '07
  5. by   Bluehair
    Quote from deehaverrn
    At our hospital all of the "salaried" workers work Monday through Friday with no holidays..so I'd prefer to be salaried if I had the choice.
    One of my points was that it is MORE difficult now to get the right pay because before I was tabulating my pay summary myself and could count every minute..whether it was leaving 10 minutes late or not getting a meal (which is VERY common on my unit). In fact, they even put monitors in our breakroom and not only do they call us when we're on breaks but staff and docs come in looking for us so it is almost impossible to relax at all. Now I get nothing for arriving early (which I don't mind..I'm leaving time for a quick cup of caffiene), but more importantly if I leave 10 minute late every day for the two week time period, that makes 100 minutes, they don't count that time unless I make a notation of it AND the charge nurse goes in to the computer and changes it. There is no way for me to check that this is done. So I need to make sure to write in my calendar EVERY time I leave late so that I can be aware of checking my paycheck. If it is incorrect, payroll won't change it unless and until the nurse manager fills out a paper.
    I guess the thing is this...maybe I wouldn't mind using the time clock IF it actually made sure I got paid for every minute...but it doesn't. 12 minutes a day can add up to alot of time. It seems like there should be some regulation about this too.
    I'm salaried now and hate it. I work a lot of extra hours above and beyond the usual M-F thing, get called in at night at times, etc. I average at least 50 hours a week but don't get any more money for my efforts. I am being paid a less than the usuall staff RN's in my unit, if you calculate the number of hours per week I actually work with my weekly salary.
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]i have never had to punch a time clock! in 30 years. wow-- i'm surprised it's so prevalent!
  7. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]i have never had to punch a time clock! in 30 years. wow-- i'm surprised it's so prevalent!
    perhaps the practice of "clocking in" is so prevalent because nursing, especially at the bedside, is still regarded by many healthcare administrators as a blue-collar profession.
  8. by   softstorms
    I have always had to punch in and out, if not by a regular time card then by a swipe or typing in my employee #. In hospitals or nursing homes. The only place I never used a card was with Agency work, the a supervisor sighned my time in and out. I have only been salaried once, then I spent more time working than I was ever paid for LOL.
  9. by   RNinSoCal
    I recently found out that the salaried nursing positions at my hospital pay a lot less than the staff RN positions. I make more than the nursing supervisor on my shift! I like the time clock because it verifies my hours and they always pay my overtime. We have computer access to our electronic time cards and the charge nurses (our charges are by shift) and managers can correct any mistakes. No major problems so far.
  10. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from Ari RN
    We punch in our last 4 digits of our SS # then our fingerprint is scanned. No swiping...... I actually asked one of my coworkers to scan his fingerprint after I punched in my SS # and apparently it didn't work. I sometimes feel violated when the machine scans my print.
    Then I'm guessing you don't have a Pyxis medication system where you work? Or maybe it's set up differently. Anyway, we scan/swipe our badges to "clock in" at work, and when getting meds out of the Pyxis, we type in our login names and then use a fingerprint scan to verify it's really "us". Frankly I love it: NO ONE can type in as me and get narcs, period.
  11. by   ginger58
    I wish we had a time clock. My first job I did--in and out.
    When I started my current job we had a 2 week paper card that we wrote down in and out, floating, OT, classes, etc. The only problem with this was the aides would come in late but write down an ontime time.
    Now we unfortunately have Teletime done by computer or phone. You have to call in a code for lunch break, floating codes, relief lead codes and if you do it on the computer only the manager can correct something.
  12. by   kontakt
    We have a regular punch-in/punch-out clock. Our hospital just instituted the use of these unpleasant devices.

    I bitterly protested. A LONG time ago, I used to be a factory worker, complete with punch-clocks. Just seeing this aweful device reminds me of those factory days. I said to management, "I thought that nursing was supposed to be a profession?" (Please, I do not mean to start a "Is Nursing a Profession" discussion.) Management empathized, but said that a few people were "signing" in "on time" when they were actually starting work late. Implementing the punch-clocks is supposedly, meant to keep everyone honest. Supposedly, it will help save money. Interestingly enough, our weak union supports this venture.

    My take??

    I always come to work early. Fifteen minutes early, most days. Additionally, I, quite often, would even start work the moment I set foot on the unit. This could be counting narcs, emptying foley's, hanging meds, checking the telemetry patients, etc., etc., etc. For good or for bad, despite starting work early, I STILL put down the time I was supposed to start (1900, for a 12 hour night shift). Basically, for good or for bad, I was giving 15 minutes of free service to the hospital. This is my time and I do what I wish.

    Well, they want us to punch-in no earlier than 5 minutes before (or 5 minutes after) the shift is supposed to start. So, I can't offically punch-in the time I actually start work.

    I feel like I am getting my hand slapped for the unfortunate actions of a few nurses. I, and many nurses at this facility like me, quite often start work early in order to lend our fellow nurse a hand. This obviously is not recognized with the implementation of the punch-clock. And it feels too "Factory Like". It surely doesn't feel like I am treated professionally.

    UGH. . . .
    Last edit by kontakt on Feb 17, '07
  13. by   Mimi2RN
    We clock in and out, either on one of the the time clocks where we can either swipe our badges or punch in the numbers, or on the computer. Also, we have to clock in and out for our 30 minute break. If I don't get a break, when I am not responsible for my patients, then I charge for it.

    The state law says something about getting a 30 minute break if you work more than 5 hours. For the most part, that doesn't happen.

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