Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated? - page 4

Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated from nursing school? Give us your opinion, comments or suggestions by posting a reply to this message. Please include... Read More

  1. by   nursedawn67
    After I graduated from a community college Practical Nursing program, I felt no where near ready to go out and work. And on top of everything, here it is Feb., and becuase of several moves in 7 months and lots of paper work hang ups from state to state I now have a license. I recently got my first nursing job and boy do I feel lost. I have worked in the Geriatrics field as a nursing assistant for the past 6 years, and I thought going back into that field as a LPN that it would be a breeze. Boy was I wrong, it is hard. It isn't the actual work itself as it is making decisions on your own, where in nursing school you always had an instructor to ok any decisions. But if you are lucky enough to get into the nursing situation that I'm in then it makes it a bit easier. The people I work with are great they offer support and physical & mental knowledge and help. Another things that helps, is when you get the free time.....read. Read your text books from school, read the drug book when you deal with unfamiliar drug, read your facility's policy and procedure manual, it helps alot. And if you need it ask your D.O.N. or A.D.O.N. if you may come in an extra day just to read the policy and procedure manual. They probably would let you because they want competent employees just as much as you want to be one. Good luck to all!
  2. by   Todd
    Yah I thoght I was ready, until my first day at work. I'man ADN and am working on my BSN. I had 9 years as a paramdic, and thought that was really going to help me. I went from the streets to CCU. Big mistake. For a long time I thought about nothing more than what a mistake I make and how I wanted to get back to the streets. I was not even close to being ready. Luckly were I started had (had) a good mentoring program and ensured me that all new nurses felt this way. Also many of the new nurses meet and "compared notes". Sure enough most of us felt this way. Most employeers do not want you to fail and will assist any way they can. Sometimes they do not know what you need, but if you tell them they will help you get what you need.
  3. by   Simon
    I have had the experience of both an LVN and BSN training program. Both of which did what they promised- provided the opportunity to learn. I have read many comments on this subject for many years now. My opinion is that we are ultimately responsible for our learning experiences. Because I have been on both sides of the learning fence (student nurse and nurse mentoring a student nurse) I believe that you have to take the responsibility into your own hands. It seems to be almost comical the amount of foreign students that can begin a nursing program without even knowing the language and be the star student by the middle of the semester. They somehow find a way to learn not only textbook but have learned the art of bedside manners that we so often say we did not get enough time to do. I realize there are some schools that are on the brink of losing their creditation for not teaching what needs to be taught. There are also circumstances that are out of our hands. But, I tend to believe that we end up reaping what we sow. I wonder if other diciplines are this co-dependant in their expectancy of being handed years of experience without the work.
    Originally posted by bshort:
    Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated from nursing school? Give us your opinion, comments or suggestions by posting a reply to this message. Please include the type of school you graduated from, for example: ADN, BSN, Diploma, LPN etc...

    After you post your feelings, visit our homepage http://wwnurse.com / and vote "yes" or "no" on our survey, and see the current results of the survey. Thanks

  4. by   kdachterman
    I received a diploma in nursing in 1979, then passed the boards to become a RN. I continued in nursing to get a BSN in 1981. My diploma school gave me wonderful clinical experience over 3 years. The BSN program gave me the information that was available to be more than just a hospital nurse. It gave me information on law and nursing, Public Health nursing, and options that included Nurse Practioner fields. After 11 years of Emergency nursing, I became a full-time parent. I helped run flu-shot clinics this past fall. This gave me the itch to "nurse" again. I have been "nursing and nurturing" my children for the past 7 years. I am ready to get back to the career I studied about several years ago. Yes, I was prepared well then, and I am confident to re-enter my field today.

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  5. by   Iris in the morning
    I graduated in 1979, from an ADN program, and my feelings were that had I not been an LPN with years of experience, I would not have been ready for the expected role of an RN.
    To this day, my suggestion is that nursing students carry a load of more than one patient in their last quarter or semester. Let them work with a nurse, versus being assigned to a patient. This would give a more accurate picture of what nursing really entails, once out of school. That is why precepted students do so much better once they are on their own. Its hard enough trying to learn the workings of the facility your employeed at, but to also be unsure what you're to do with the patient and family adds more stress, and frustration. If we are to see real changes, let start at the way students are trained - more hands - on is a definite must. Students need to really start understanding the real challanges in our profession - how to handle more than one thing at a time, and still be able to leave at the end of a shift, knowing we gave the best we could under the circumstances.
  6. by   Iris in the morning
    I graduated in 1979, from an ADN program, and my feelings were that had I not been an LPN with experience, I would not have been ready for the expected clinical role of an RN.
    To this day, my suggestion is that nursing students carry a load of more than one patient in their last quarter or semester. Let them work with a nurse, versus being assigned to a patient. This would give a more accurate picture of what nursing really entails, once out of school. That is why precepted students do so much better once they are on their own. Its hard enough trying to learn the workings of the facility your employeed at, but to also be unsure what you're to do with the patient and family adds more stress, and frustration. If we are to see real changes, let start at the way students are trained - more hands - on is a definite must. Students need to really start understanding the real challanges in our profession - how to handle more than one thing at a time, and still be able to leave at the end of a shift, knowing we gave the best we could under the circumstances.
  7. by   Iris in the morning
    I graduated in 1979, from an ADN program, and my feelings were that had I not been an LPN with experience, I would not have been ready for the expected clinical role of an RN.
    To this day, my suggestion is that nursing students carry a load of more than one patient in their last quarter or semester. Let them work with a nurse, versus being assigned to a patient. This would give a more accurate picture of what nursing really entails, once out of school. That is why precepted students do so much better once they are on their own. Its hard enough trying to learn the workings of the facility your employeed at, but to also be unsure what you're to do with the patient and family adds more stress, and frustration. If we are to see real changes, let start at the way students are trained - more hands - on is a definite must. Students need to really start understanding the real challanges in our profession - how to handle more than one thing at a time, and still be able to leave at the end of a shift, knowing we gave the best we could under the circumstances.
  8. by   Miss Saigon
    I graduated in 98 as a ADN, and I feel that no matter how much "book" knowledge I got, that if you are not able to connect with poeple on their level all the knowlege in the world is not going to help you. I have worked on a rehab unit, a long term care unit, a dementia unit, and a medical unit. At times I may not of known everything about a patients diagnosis, but I have always known, that behind that diagnosis, is a HUMAN BEING, with REAL thoughts, and fears. IF you can understand that SIMPLE CONCEPT, the rest will come in time.

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  9. by   MarkRN
    I don't think there are many nursing programs in the country that really prepare nurses for the "real world" - whether they are ADN or BSN programs. Of the nurses I have talked to, the ones who seemed most prepared graduated from a diploma program, where they had lots of hands-on clinical time during their schooling. I graduated from a NLN-accredited ADN program in NC that had more clinical time than most BSN programs in the state, to include UNC schools and East Carolina University, and I still felt "reality shock" when starting my career as a staff nurse. Alot of people get caught up in the "which is better - ADN or BSN?" hype. I believe that a BSN is important to obtain for further career progression, especially if one has aspirations to be an advanced practice nurse, and I believe that all nurses should aspire to further their education - whether it is obtaining a BSN, MSN, or PhD, etc. However, to say that one degree prepares a nurse better than the other has yet to be seen. If we really want to get down to the key issue here, think about this: what about adding an additional year to the curriculum that is solely focused on clinical skills and application of critical thinking - a "residency" something like MD's go through? I think that something like this would be very beneficial to student nurses. I know this would lead to a big restructuring of nursing programs and would add an additional year of schooling, but I think we would see a vast improvement in the quality of new grads, and they would be much more confident upon entering the workforce. What do you think? Please share your thoughts!
  10. by   mcrow
    Boy does this bring back memories. My question was more "Was I adequately prepared for my preceptor?". If I wasn't prepared by school she sure made a point of telling me so. I was sooo happy when that month was over. I graduated a LPN program 10 years ago pretty well prepared I think. More hands-on I think would have been helpful as far as making what I learned from the books a practical concept. Luckily, after the first month, I wasn't expected to know all the same things as the more experienced nurses. I try to treat new nurses the same way and help them out when I can.
  11. by   NMB22
    I feel I was somewhat prepared when I graduated. I went to a fast paced 1 year Lpn school through the military.. We had classroom time the first few months, then started clinicals 2 days a week, with classes for the other 3 days. Soon it was up to 3 days clinical, then 4, and after we took our last exam we worked in the hospital 5 days a week for about a month. It was just like having a regular nursing job towards the end. I think my instructors went out of their way to make sure we had opportunities for hands on, such as IV's, foleys, blood draws, etc. Another good thing we did was practicing IV's and blood draws, injections, etc. on each other. (classmates and instructors). It made us feel more comfortable when we had to do a procedure on a patient. All in all I was satisfied with my schooling, although when it came time for the NCLEX, we all thought felt like we didn't know anything, but we had a very high pass rate, and our instructors told us we'd feel like that when we went out in the real world to out first jobs.
  12. by   BabyNurse
    No, following graduation I DID NOT feel that I was adequately prepared for my new role as a nurse. I graduated from Florida Atlantic University in April 1999 with a bachelor's degree in nursing. Our College's focus was very unique in that it was based on "loving, caring and knowing your patient in totality".
    That's right, in other words, our program's #1 focus was on loving and knowing the patient and the #2 focus was to teach us the technical aspects of nursing. As a result, we were often times ridiculed for not knowing as much as the ADN's.
    I would say that the majority of my graduating class got very tired of all that LOVING AND CARING stuff. We wanted more hands-on experience. Besides, why should a College dedicate an entire program on being loving, compassionate and caring? You have to care for others to be a nurse(or so I thought at that time).
    BUT, NOW THAT I HAVE HAD ALMOST A YEAR TO EXPOUND ON MY EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT FAU. I DON'T THINK THAT THERE ARE ANY NEW NURSES THAT FEEL PREPARED FOR THEIR NEW ROLES REGARDLESS OF THE TYPE OF DEGREE THAT THEY RECEIVED. THEREFORE, I AM GRATEFUL FOR THE EDUCATION THAT I RECEIVED AT FAU.
    YOU CAN TEACH ANYONE TO INSERT A FOLEY OR START AN IV...BUT HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE WILLING TO GO THAT EXTRA MILE IN ORDER TO MAKE SOMEONE ELSE HAPPY? Besides, since graduation I have had ample time to perfect my skills and techniques during those 12 hr shifts.
    Baby,RN
  13. by   DanRn
    WHAT A LOADED QUESTION !!!!!

    No one, in any job profession, is prepared by education alone.

    30% of teachers quit in the first three years.

    My business major friends have had numerous jobs in the last 3 years.

    1st year residents - enough said.

    WE ARE NOT ALONE.

    AND CAN WE PLEASE HAVE MORE POSITIVE TOPICS ??


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