Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated? - page 3

Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated from nursing school? Give us your opinion, comments or suggestions by posting a reply to this message. Please include... Read More

  1. by   EJD-LPN
    I DIDNT FELL THAT I WAS READY TO BE A L.P.N WHEN I GRADUATED NURSING PROGRAM.I HAVE AND IM STILL LEARNING EVERY DAY. THINGS IN NURSING CHANGE SO OFTEN THAT I FEEL YOU LEARN THE BASICS IN SCHOOL AND THE REAT IN THE FIELD JANE
    Originally posted by bshort:
    Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated from nursing school? Give us your opinion, comments or suggestions by posting a reply to this message. Please include the type of school you graduated from, for example: ADN, BSN, Diploma, LPN etc...

    After you post your feelings, visit our homepage http://wwnurse.com / and vote "yes" or "no" on our survey, and see the current results of the survey. Thanks

  2. by   diana davies
    Yes, I did feel well prepared. I graduated with a BA (Hons) in Adult Nursing in Oxford, England. The nurse education I received has never let me down.
    Among many other skills I learned problem-solving - so if I don't know something, I assess the situation and go and find out.
  3. by   Shellyrn97
    This is for all the young nurses who just or are graduating. There is a big discussion among nurses on "eating their young" and nobody willing to mentor the new nurses. I have read many of the letters and the reasons that people have stated for this attitude. While some of it has merit, some of it does not. I had 11 years of CNA expeince behind me when I graduated and became a RN and even this was not enough. Some say I was naive in thinking that Nursing would be like the girls luck club. I know that sounds awful coming from a 30 year old and I should have known better. Sometimes I dont think the older nurses understand where the younger ones come from and vs. See when you are in school they make it out to be something it is not. All these high ideas that in reality just dont work or you need to go about it a different way. Young nurses do not understand this. Nursing in general is grey and it envolves human beings. And each one has a personality of their own, so each individual case has an individual problem solving conclusion. This is the most important thing that school forgets to teach, if they mention it, it is in passing "and do not forget every case is different." You have the knowledge base and minimum clinical practice to back it up. And to the young new nurses. Pick and choose your mentors. I have done long term to med surg and now I am entering emergancy nursing and there is so much I have no idea about. 20 years experience will teach me what I need to know and even then I will still be learning. Listen to the older nurses, ask their opioion, pick and choose your mentors. Some hate to teach, find the ones who dont. Always use your instincts and number one, if you have used all your resourses and can no longer problem solve call you physican. They are the ones who will lead you and document, document, document. Young nurses have patients with older nurses because they have been there. Older nurses please remember what it was like to be there. I can not express my thanks to the mentors in my life, I am the nurse I am today because of them.

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    shelly
  4. by   t-s-l
    I graduated from a 4 year BSN program in June1998. Made 2 attempts to taking the nclex. Unfortunately I did not pass; leaving me feeling depressed and discouraged. I feel that maybe God did not plan for me to be an RN. I also feel that my nursing school did not prepare me for the exam. We should have been more focued on Nclex review questions and hands-on hospital experience. The NCLEX should have been our focus and included in our educational curriculum. We did not receive enough hands on hospital experience. Throughout my whole clinical experience, I have not had more that 2 patients at a time(2 patients the most). That is not reality. In the real world, nurses must handle many patients at one time. It's like after graduation day, we were just thrown out into the harsh world of seeking review courses and job opportunities. I feel so alone. After this terrifying ordeal, I can imagine what my first hospital-working experience will be like. Thankyou for allowing me to express these bottled up feelings. t-s-l


    Originally posted by bshort:
    Do you feel you were adequately prepared to practice nursing when you graduated from nursing school? Give us your opinion, comments or suggestions by posting a reply to this message. Please include the type of school you graduated from, for example: ADN, BSN, Diploma, LPN etc...

    After you post your feelings, visit our homepage http://wwnurse.com / and vote "yes" or "no" on our survey, and see the current results of the survey. Thanks

  5. by   lisa edelmon
    I feel I was adequately prepared for my role as a nurse. I may not have known everything I needed to know but I was comfortable working. I graduated 12 years ago from a diploma program. I then went on to get my BSN. The program I went to gave me a strong theory base and hands on experience. My clinicals initially were days a week ,8 hours each and at the end of my senoir year I was in clinicals 4 full days a week. It was the best experience.
  6. by   CAROL1
    Yes, I got a BSN and what I expected to get from my education was a background that prepared me begin my learning career. The problem comes in when you enter the workplace. It probably varies from institution to institution, but the hospital where I went to work made a lot of mistakes. I believe there needs to be more mentoring in the beginning. Also, since policies and proceedures change so much, time needs to be made for this updating to occur. A lot of the mistakes and problems could be prevented and Nurses do their share!
  7. by   Lori A Wilkinson
    No, I would not have been prepared to work in the nursing field after graduating from an ADN/RN program. The program I attended basically taught you to pass the boards. If I had not already been in the nursing field for several years in other capacities I would not have a clue and that is scary. Most colleges are hung up on math and english pre-regs, I think the major pre-reg for any RN program should be at least one year in the nursing field either as an CNA or LPN. My advice to anyone wanting to go into the nursing field is to go out and try it first before they invest time and money into a program.
  8. by   justanurse
    t-s-l:
    Do not feel so discouraged. I worked with a wonderful nurse that did not pass her boards the first two times. She make it on the third time, though. I worked with a different nurse who signed up for the military and was gung-ho to enter after she passed her boards. She flunked. Then she got to re-thinking her choices and realized that maybe it was working out for the best. (She met her husband the next year and got married/pregnant.) There are lots of reasons for not passing.
    Find that review course, if it's a book, purchase it, if it's classes, sign up. And, then do something nice for yourself, and think positive thoughts. You know the stuff or you wouldn't have passed your nursing program. Those tests are hard and STRESSFUL! Give yourself the break you deserve and then start in again.
    Best wishes to your next time!!!
  9. by   NANCPER
    I feel like I was adequately prepared when I graduated from nursing school. I am a diploma graduate - 20 years ago we did stay in the dorm, eat in the hospital cafeteria, etc. We did do nursing care like the "real" nurses did then. We were "team leaders", took a "side" of patients and really knew them. I wish that I could say that the same happens now. I also saw from the other side of the coin, becomming an LPN educator. The faculty constantly wrestled with were our graduates able to enter the workforce and function. The school that I taught in (which has since closed, along with my diploma program) spent several weeks "cutting the cord" from our students right before they graduated.

    I also lament the closing of hospital based programs, both RN and LPN. I believe there is no education or preparation like it!
  10. by   barbd
    I graduated from an LPN program in 1990. I felt prepared to do med/surg in a small hospital. I got my RN from the Regents in '96 after a lot of different experiences. I had an excellent foundation on which to build.
  11. by   AZRN
    I feel fortunate that my nursing education began at the CNA stage and progressed to BSN with a MS in Psych. My community college ADN program had an excellent clinical rotation and I was ready to practice upon graduation. So much so, that I worked for 3 months on a gen peds unit, then transferred to the only RN position on the night shift in the NICU. The BSN program at NMSU assisted me in research based practice and leadership skills. Overall, I am very pleased with my nursing education, so far.
  12. by   AZRN
    Forgot to mention in the above response that I grad with ADN in 1988 & BSN in 1992.
  13. by   Silktea3
    Originally posted by AZRN:
    Forgot to mention in the above response that I grad with ADN in 1988 & BSN in 1992.

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