Do Rns Clean The Urine And Bowels - page 4

Hi Everybody, Im New To This Site. I Have A Bs In Biology And Thinking For Absn ( Accelerated Bsn) . I Have A Question, What Exactly Is The Duty Of A Rn ( Who's Done Absn) . Does She/he Need To... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    Because we are a large nursing bulletin board, we sometimes attract those that are less than truthful. Ignoring someone's post that become more bizarre as time goes on is sometimes the best idea.
  2. by   scribblerpnp
    .
    Last edit by scribblerpnp on Nov 6, '06
  3. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from Dashing
    THANKS FOR UR REPLY. WHAT ABOUT THE RNS IN THE DOCTOR'S OFFICE . REMEMBER , THE NURSES WHOM A PATIENT SEE BEFORE MEETING A DOCTOR . I MEAN THOSE WHO TAKE UR WEIGHT, BLOOD PRESSURE, MEDICAL HISTORY AND THEN LET U WAIT FOR THE DOCTOR TO SEE U. ( I THINK THOSE NURSES DO A SIMPLE JOB THAN THOSE WHO WORK IN HOSPITAL WARDS IS IT? )
    Would you kindly stop shouting?
  4. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from iceyspots
    Being a CNA when you have a bachelors degree already?
    Yeah, what of it? It would give someone considering nursing a good idea of some of the less wonderful aspects of the job.
  5. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Because we are a large nursing bulletin board, we sometimes attract those that are less than truthful. Ignoring someone's post that become more bizarre as time goes on is sometimes the best idea.
    Ditto!!! If it's a joke...don't provide the enjoyment...if it's not a joke then it's really really sad. This person has "no" clue about nursing and doesn't even want to learn about nursing unless her hands can stay clean. Hey maybe this person is a germ-o-phobic? Ok....Fess up! Therapy may be needed here. Speaking of therapy.....My Shrink once told me about how in medical school they had to do the bowel program for inpatient quads. Whoops, sorry poster you can't be a Psychiatrist either.
  6. by   ann945n
    Quote from MS._Jen_RN
    Many of those folks in the offices aren't nurses, they're MAs. And if they are RN's they went to school and in school, like all nurses, they probably had to clean a patient. Sorry to say, there's no way around it. We deal with caring for people and people poop, people pee, people vomit. It's gross, smelly, chunky, runny, hard, foamy, and all colors of the rainbow. But, it happens, we all do it. Again, if you can't deal with, don't go down that road. There are plenty of other professions that care form and help people (Social Work) who don't deal with it. If you're looking into it for the paycheck, that's the wrong reason and you won't make it with your issue.
    ~Jen
    LOL your post made me laugh, so true so true! what a vast rainbow of bodly fluids people produce, its like a poem!
  7. by   BabyRN2Be
    I've responded with patience on another thread of Dashing's. I think what this person wants is job security and good pay... without the poop.

    I agree with Trauma, this person is either having fun, or decided s/he wants woke up yesterday morning and said, "Hey, I wanna be a nurse! Lotsa pay and jobs! But what about the poop factor? Better go research this and decide to do this before Monday!" And ended up on allnurses.

    At this point, that's the only scenario that makes sense.
  8. by   Fiona59
    My first thought was TROLL, but then after reading the rest of their posts it became clear.

    It's over education syndrome. The more post-secondary education the potential nurse has the less he/she wants to deal with bodily fluids...
  9. by   futurecnm
    I am a nursing student, in my first semester of clinicals right now. I have only had 2 weekends of clinicals and have already gotten urinated on, and cleaned many poop messes. I have also given complete bed baths where, yes, you have to clean every area of the body. If you want to get a degree in nursing you will definately have to do these jobs in school. When you first start school you don't have many skills so you are responsible for the basic cares like bathing, bathroom, eating etc. There is no way around it. And the RN's on the floor I am working with also clean up these type of things. Yes, there are CNA's that help but everyone is busy so it is unavoidable. If you don't want to deal with bodily fluids, then nursing probably isn't the best choice. I don't think anyone "likes" to deal with this type of thing, but you have to get used to it and realize it is part of the job. I always try to put myself in the patients shoes and realize how they must feel. If I were them, I would want someone compassionate and kind to take care of these things for me.
  10. by   angelcharm
    Quote from babyrn2be
    i've responded with patience on another thread of dashing's. i think what this person wants is job security and good pay... without the poop.

    i agree with trauma, this person is either having fun, or decided s/he wants woke up yesterday morning and said, "hey, i wanna be a nurse! lotsa pay and jobs! but what about the poop factor? better go research this and decide to do this before monday!" and ended up on allnurses.

    at this point, that's the only scenario that makes sense.
    good assessment..
    his/her question might sound funny but theres nothing wrong with curiousity...

    when in doubt, theres nothing wrong with asking.
    havent u been doing health teachings? hehe...
  11. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    I've responded with patience on another thread of Dashing's. I think what this person wants is job security and good pay... without the poop.

    I agree with Trauma, this person is either having fun, or decided s/he wants woke up yesterday morning and said, "Hey, I wanna be a nurse! Lotsa pay and jobs! But what about the poop factor? Better go research this and decide to do this before Monday!" And ended up on allnurses.

    At this point, that's the only scenario that makes sense.
    I've begun to agree with your assessment. Sad isn't it, that someone would even consider getting into it knowing they can't deal with a part of it.
    ~Jen
  12. by   Katnip
    Quote from Dashing
    THANK U VERY MUCH FOR UR SINCERE INFORMATION/ANSWER. JUST CURIOUS , IS THERE ANY COURSE THAT INVOLVES ONLY NURSING MANAGEMENT AS U JUST MENTIONED. I MEAN ANY NURSING COURSE THAT DOES NOT HAVE TO GO TO PATIENTS ROOM RATHER JUST SUPERVISE THE NURSES ? IM CONFUSED . U SEEM TO BE VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE PLEASE HELP.
    Nursing management usually requires that you work as a nurse first. I haven't seen any management job that you can just walk into without experience in any industry. After all, you need to know on a deep level what you are managing and what the staff does.

    Nursing Management degrees are usually on the Master's level and you will need that BSN first. I'm sure there are management certification courses to take, but again, you need to be a nurse first. And that includes dealing with the good and bad parts of nursing.

    Honestly, if the bodily fluids bother you that much, I would suggest a different career. Maybe Radiology.
  13. by   Katnip
    Quote from Dashing
    THANKS FOR UR REPLY. WHAT ABOUT THE RNS IN THE DOCTOR'S OFFICE . REMEMBER , THE NURSES WHOM A PATIENT SEE BEFORE MEETING A DOCTOR . I MEAN THOSE WHO TAKE UR WEIGHT, BLOOD PRESSURE, MEDICAL HISTORY AND THEN LET U WAIT FOR THE DOCTOR TO SEE U. ( I THINK THOSE NURSES DO A SIMPLE JOB THAN THOSE WHO WORK IN HOSPITAL WARDS IS IT? )
    Unfortunately, as it's been said, nurse's in a doctor's office aren't nurses or are often LPNs. A Registered nurse would be hired usually for some complex procedures that a med aide can't do, such as assist in a surgical suite. But then you will risk dealing with bodily fluids, and most will want experience in a hospital.

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