do nurses eat their young - page 2

I have bben working for this hospital for three months and it seems like every other day I get in trouble for some paper not filled out and half the time it is not my fault, something that should... Read More

  1. by   jo272wv
    I heard that phrase all through nursing school also, when I entered the real world I found just the opposite. Most of the nurses I worked under duing training went beyond my expectations in explaining procedures I was not comfortable with, also in better charting in order to cover my a--. A nurse or two that were rude were usually rude to everyone, not just me. I have worked in a few professions in my lifetime and see little differences in employee interactions. You always have the nice, friendly, helpful fellow workers and you have the ******, leave me alone, I dont have time for you attatudes (usually mean they hate their job anyways).

    Lets change this phrase to : Nurses care for their young....
  2. by   icugirl33
    Hello,

    I have heard that saying and have noticed that some nurse try to uphold that reputation. As a new grad last year, I made sure I knew my stuff and anything that could of been reported by another nurse, I reported myself to my manager(such as coming in late.) A few nurses did try to intimidate but I made it very clear that I was an RN just like them and if you want to play a game of tatletale, I'm a very good player. All went extremely well thereafter.
  3. by   barbie90210
    [font=book antiqua]people under stress are different than people not under stress. the exact same person in another situation might be friendly and helpful. being a preceptor can be hard - especially if the unit is busy. you have all of your work and are teaching someone so your work is doubled. some preceptors just sit back and let the orientee drown and that's not good. i would ask for a change in my preceptor if that happens because your orientation is brief and you need to make the most of it. there is generally a lot of "writing up" in nursing. it can be extreme nitpicking to something that is justified. if you are working with super critical people you have to be especially careful because they will not cut you any slack. maybe you can find a more congenial group to work with in the future. keep your cool and respond - don't react. be dignified and professional. try not to gossip about these instances because it only makes things worse - venting here is ok. we're here for you. however it must be stressed that anything to do with medicines is an urgent priority. be sure to check your orders, lab results, and double check to see that you charted every medicine. they are justified in writing you up for that. it's one thing to postpone a bed bath until the next shift but you can't do that with medicine. it can be hard - but hang in there. it gets easier with practice! :spin:
    Last edit by barbie90210 on Nov 11, '06
  4. by   Daytonite
    Quote from tjpalone
    i have been working for this hospital for three months and it seems like every other day i get in trouble for some paper not filled out and half the time it is not my fault, something that should have been done another shift, then i get in trouble because i gave a med iv antibiotic it was hung and dated but i forgot to sign it out on the mar the nurse who got me in trouble i saw had tons of med blanks but i let it go, i love being a nurse but i am getting tired of feeling almost picked on, what should i do
    in answer to your question "what should i do?", you should strive to make the corrections to your practice that are being pointed out to you. people don't usually get us into trouble, we get there all by ourselves. granted, getting blamed for paperwork not being filled out may be unfair, but there is a continuity of care that demands that some paperwork needs to be completed by the next nurse in line. i've had to complete my share of admission assessments on patients who were admitted on the shift before me. a medication error, even one of failing to chart it was given, is still an error and potentially a significant one. you need to put the responsibility where it belongs, own up to the mistakes you are making, correct them and move on. this is how we learn and become better practitioners. as new grads we all went through this phase of making errors and learning. part of orienting to a new job includes learning how a facility handles it's paperwork. it's their way, or the highway. there are very good reasons for all the rules and if you are interesting in knowing why it is easy enough to find them out. if i am feeling picked on then i feel i have two choices: (1) do everything i can to prevent the circumstances leading up to my being picked on, or (2) get out of the situation.

    as to "nurses eating their young", i so dislike this phrase. it is merely a cute, playful, idiomatic way of saying someone is being nasty. it plays down the seriousness of the bullying and psychological game playing that is really going on. ill-tempered behavior directed toward anyone is just unacceptable and it happens in all walks of life, in all professions, not just nursing. to combat it you need to learn assertiveness and therapeutic communication techniques. these are interpersonal communication skills that you may or may not have been introduced to in nursing school. you can also learn them by studying on your own.
  5. by   angelcharm
    i agree there are some.. but not all are like that.

    sometimes i like the strict ones becoz they challenge me to become better.
  6. by   Tweety
    I'm sorry you're having a rough time.

    To answer the first question "do nurses eat their young". I agree with the concensus that some do. However, don't get too jaded by your experiences so as to label to profession and believe stereotypes. It's deaming to our profession. Is every single nurse you work with picking on you? Hopefully not. But unfortunately some do.

    2nd question as to what you should do. I would just consider each indicent as it arrives. Take lessons learned, and if it's not your fault, don't own it, correct it, and correct the person who is trying to get you in trouble. It's tough when you work around petty people, but nip it in the bud each and every time. If your in the wrong, apologize and learn. If not correct the accuser.
  7. by   destiny5
    Nurses eating their young has some validity. Ok, yes it happens in all professions, but we are talking about NURSING.---
    To the OP--- Own your mistakes and do better next time....
    To the preceptors: Us new nurses are sorry that you are overloaded...your work + ours + our stupid questions....yada yada. How about letting someone know that you are overwhelmed and perhaps give up the preceptor job.....instead of traumatizing us new nurses---we got enough of that in school.
  8. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from destiny5
    Nurses eating their young has some validity. Ok, yes it happens in all professions, but we are talking about NURSING.---
    To the OP--- Own your mistakes and do better next time....
    To the preceptors: Us new nurses are sorry that you are overloaded...your work + ours + our stupid questions....yada yada. How about letting someone know that you are overwhelmed and perhaps give up the preceptor job.....instead of traumatizing us new nurses---we got enough of that in school.
    We have told many of you. There are also many posts from experienced nurses asking that new nurses keep this in mind. What usually happens is just what happened now...the new nurse chastizes the older nurses for having the nerve to be overwhelmed.

    That "yada, yada" remark was thoughtless and uncalled for.
    Last edit by PANurseRN1 on Nov 12, '06
  9. by   teenynurse
    heres the thing we have a nurse been there awhile, she is on light duty all she had to do is orders and paperwork part of nursing, and help myself and another nurse with being new and questions she makes it worse then good she is so lazyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy ! with taking a full patient load we still have to do orders and the tideous paperwork she is suppose to and she doesnt help, myself and the other new nurse pretty much rely on each other.
  10. by   PANurseRN1
    This is completely different from what you originally posted. And it still does not address the issue of your needing to take responsibility for your mistakes, rather than pointing fingers/making excuses.

    Based on your most recent post, you are having a problem with one nurse, yet you chose to paint all experienced nurses with the brush of being "new nurse eaters."
  11. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from TJPalone
    I have bben working for this hospital for three months and it seems like every other day I get in trouble for some paper not filled out and half the time it is not my fault, something that should have been done another shift, then I get in trouble because I gave a med iv antibiotic it was hung and dated but I forgot to sign it out on the mar the nurse who got me in trouble I saw had tons of med bllanks but I let it go, I love being a nurse but I am getting tired of feeling almst picked on, what should I do
    From now on, don't let it go. Speak up, speak against anyone who badmouths you. Fight tooth and nail. Meet her after work outside, wipe up the street with her, LOL. Just kidding about the physical stuff but am very serious about the pointing out of her errors to the supervisor. If she is going to bash you that way, bash her right back. In love, of course, only to help her be a better nurse. LOL
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from TrudyRN
    From now on, don't let it go. Speak up, speak against anyone who badmouths you. Fight tooth and nail. Meet her after work outside, wipe up the street with her, LOL. Just kidding about the physical stuff but am very serious about the pointing out of her errors to the supervisor. If she is going to bash you that way, bash her right back. In love, of course, only to help her be a better nurse. LOL
    Tit for tat is not the way to go. Running off to mommy and being a tattletale will not engender positive feelings toward the OP. Unless the OP sees a mistake that truly merits writing up, it's better to just let that sort of thing go. Charting errors/discrepancies catch up to you eventually.

    The last thing the OP needs to do is spend time looking for things to nail her co-workers for. She should concentrate on her practice, her patients, period. It sounds like from her first post she does have things to work on...she should work on those issues instead of trying to find fault with others.

    If she is being harrassed, that's another matter. But one thing I have noted lately is that new nurses seem to bristle whenever they get negative feedback. NEWSFLASH: You're new. You're going to make mistakes. Your co-workers and preceptors need to point your mistakes out to you so you can improve. And we all make mistakes, no matter how long we've been nurses.

    Negative feedback does not mean the same thing as being "eaten."
  13. by   NurseCard
    Do you wanna know what I'VE noticed in the time that I've been a nurse?

    I've noticed that the nastiest nurses that I've worked with, are the ones that have not even been nurses that long. They are still fairly new and for some strange reason think that they know everything there is to know. Then they pick on the even-newer nurses and the perhaps not-so-new nurses that have more difficulty doing their jobs.

    I've never had quite as much trouble with nurses who have been around 15, 20, 30 years. Maybe it's because they are just wiser?

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