Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 29

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, “You’re rolling in the big bucks!” To keep things honest, I’ll recall a few... Read More


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    I am sure there must be an ignore feature on which a person can click here. Use it.






    Again, back to normative and relevant. . . .
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    Quote from Zenyatta321
    I find your comments too funny ! My friend just graduated in Feb. 2012 and became a charge nurse in July making $55 an hour plus overtime. You can also be a travel nurse.
    $55 hourly is common in high cost of living areas (parts of California, NYC, NJ, etc.), but most nurses in this country never have (and never will) earn $55 per hour. One of my coworkers has nearly 50 years of experience and barely earns $35 hourly. One of the charge nurses has been an RN for 40 years and barely earns $39 per hour.
    Quote from Zenyatta321
    My other friend in home health made $130K last year.
    Again, this is an outlier. The average nurse in the US is not going to ever earn $130k in a year unless he/she has two full time jobs or works loads of overtime. Nurses in parts of California, New York, and NJ might earn this kind of money, but it is unlikely anywhere else.
    Quote from Zenyatta321
    I do not and will not let anyone belittle me or scream in my face or I call security...case closed. That is not why I am there. I am reading about how a woman slammed a nurse into a wall. HELLO ! That's called assult.
    Not all healthcare facilities employ security staff.
    Quote from Zenyatta321
    It just seems that nurses are always going out of their way to justify there position. You are there for the patient not the other way around. You can always transfer into another dept. if you aren't happy. A lot of jobs don't have that option and do not have sick days or holiday pay and deal with a lot of the same issues of people being irate over something. You just have to be smarter and laugh it off.
    Not all jobs have the option of interdepartmental transfers. Not all healthcare facilities offer sick days, holiday pay, or paid time off.
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    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    Awww, your wife is just a sucker, according to your little friend here. I guess I am too. I realize one reason why no one with more experience than me wants to be charge. It's probably one of the same reasons why they're still working a med-surg floor after 10-15 years.



    In my opinion it was quite the value for the money!
    I know the areas in which I worked, guess what--tons of liability in taking on a role that, in the units--they can become quite stressful. Fellows and attendings are there so, often. They want things to roll a certain way. The very smart units would not let relatively new new take charge on a regular basis. Sometimes they want them to get the feel for things, but there is back up; it's more like a trial run, so it's kind of a joke. Certainly doesn't happen in the units at pediatric centers. It didn't happen in most of the adult heart and other SICU's I've worked either. I've seen the stress get so crazy, it put people in their pregnancies at risk. Sure, when everything is cool, a lot of it is simply "housekeeping" in nature. But when the $%^& hits the fan, it can become quite a mess, and sometimes it puts the nurse's license at risk. But also, you have to remember that different centers function in different ways. What happens typically at a high level, inner city, academic hospital will be totally different from many community hospital settings or mid-level settings. And some inner city hospitals are in the midst of seriously crazy ghettos, and you need combat pay to go into work. One thing is certain. You learn a lot working in such places.


    At any rate, I have worked adult, pediatric, and neonatal critical care--medicine and critical surgery for the bulk of my many years in nursing. But some people like their med-surgs floors, and if it still suits them after 10-15 years, I say good for them.

    Once more: The inital salary is comparatively good; but nurses, even most excellent ones, are not gradated up appropriately over time. Some exceptions, as previously noted--some of the VA hospitals--because it's government and they have a boarding system, some hospitals with strong unions--but even some of the unions can only work so much good.

    It's how nursing is evaluated in the sense of added value that has long been the problem.
    Last edit by samadams8 on Dec 3, '12
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I remember as a fairly new grad of the hospital's nurse residency program I went through the charge nurse training class and was made night charge. At the time I thought my selection to charge was a compliment. I learned different and now realize I was being taken advantage of.



    *** Well there is also the false and self serving "nursing shortage" propaganda that has been the mantra in main stream media for a couple decades. This false propganda has attracted many people to nursing who otherwise would not have been attracted to it (of course exactly the goal of the false propaganda)



    *** Compairing the education required to gain entrance to the field to the compensation is the wrong way to look at it. More accurate to compair level of responsibiliety to compensation. Seen that way our compensation is inadiquate.
    I agree with this, and I had a great reply, but for some reason, every time I go on to this site with Firefox browser, there are problems. I may post it tomorrow.

    Just wanted to say, that you really did hit the nail on the head with this post.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I remember as a fairly new grad of the hospital's nurse residency program I went through the charge nurse training class and was made night charge. At the time I thought my selection to charge was a compliment. I learned different and now realize I was being taken advantage of.



    *** Well there is also the false and self serving "nursing shortage" propaganda that has been the mantra in main stream media for a couple decades. This false propganda has attracted many people to nursing who otherwise would not have been attracted to it (of course exactly the goal of the false propaganda)



    *** Compairing the education required to gain entrance to the field to the compensation is the wrong way to look at it. More accurate to compair level of responsibiliety to compensation. Seen that way our compensation is inadiquate.
    Huh, I guess being on the night shift as charge would have been much easier...never thought of that..no doctors, no random vistors, and a few other benifits.

    I do agree about the nursing shortage, there really isn't one where I live. People are struggling to find jobs. And hospitals are opting to hire new Grads over exp nurses that continously jump around to new organizations. The college and universties are pushing their own agenda in more ways than just calling a "nursing shortage"

    Good point about education. But I still feel the same way. I honestly agree if the world was a better place, it would be great to get paid more. But that's not going to happen and mostly likely is going to get worst for the regular floor nurse. Now if our country's trend of not taking care of themselves and producing tons of more people in the health care system stopped, maybe things could change, but that's not going to happen. As the decline increases, health care administration is going to push for more with less. So the best thing for any nurse that has decades of experience is to realize this, and push foward on to bigger and better things. Everyone has the same opportunities, it's really whether or not you personally chose to decide if it is worth it to yourself. Complaining is like beating a dead horse.
    And stiffening the requirements for entry level is not going to happen...that's a Nursing institution push. Administration could care less as long as the job gets done meeting requirements....and ASN's are doing that.
    Simply put... money makes the world go round. Just as much as people want more money in their pocket....corporations want to keep as much as they can in theirs. And with the Nursing shortage not really there, as you pointed out, there is someone in line waiting to take your spot for less money. Like it or hate it...it doesn't matter.

    So yes...right now nurses are fairly compensated.
    Last edit by eroc on Dec 3, '12
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    Quote from eroc
    Huh, I guess being on the night shift as charge would have been much easier...never thought of that..no doctors, no random vistors, and a few other benifits.
    *** I don't know how many night shifts you have worked in a large SICU with a very active open heart program at a level 1 trama center but you are mistaken. Nights have nearly as much going on as days with a lot less staff and support to deal with it. Night charge was much harder hence it was dreaded and why I was doing it. the day charge has the advantage of having the NM around to deal with a lot of things. On nights the charge is it, at least at that hospital. Lot's of doctors and lots of highly stressed emergency open heart patient's and trauma patien's families in at all hours.
    Despite having owned my own business and managing employees and despite being an experienced paramedic, I was a new ICU nurse and I wasn't ready to be charge in that kind of unit. I just didn't know it at the time. I shudder to think of the risks I took.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I don't know how many night shifts you have worked in a large SICU with a very active open heart program at a level 1 trama center but you are mistaken. Nights have nearly as much going on as days with a lot less staff and support to deal with it. Night charge was much harder hence it was dreaded and why I was doing it. the day charge has the advantage of having the NM around to deal with a lot of things. On nights the charge is it, at least at that hospital. Lot's of doctors and lots of highly stressed emergency open heart patient's and trauma patien's families in at all hours.
    Despite having owned my own business and managing employees and despite being an experienced paramedic, I was a new ICU nurse and I wasn't ready to be charge in that kind of unit. I just didn't know it at the time. I shudder to think of the risks I took.
    Maybe that is the difference between a lot of our thoughts. I can respect if you where in a level 1 trama center. That's the same reason many nurses I know avoid the one we have here. So you actually are a rare case. I fully respect your instance as being a set up.
    The level one here goes through nurses like crazy. Most can't handle the stress of it, and couldn't imagine what it would be like to be thrown in to that.
    All majors traumas go straight to that one hospital, and we have approx. 9 hospitals in town.
    I was actually offered a shot at the med flight nurse once I got a year in, along with my paremedic's liscense. But don't forsee taking that route. (yes, I knew the helicopter pilot)
    Last edit by eroc on Dec 3, '12
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    I do agree about the nursing shortage, there really isn't one where I live. People are struggling to find jobs.
    *** There hasn't been more than very local, very temporary nursing shortages in the 18 years I have been in nursing. There have been times when many, many more jobs were available but that isn't the same as a shortage of trained nurses. Rather an indication of how many nurses were willing to work for the pay and working conditions being offered at a time when there were many other competing oppertunities for nurses.

    The college and universties are pushing their own agenda in more ways than just calling a "nursing shortage"
    *** Colleges and universities aren't even the main propagandists.

    Good point about education. But I still feel the same way. I honestly agree if the world was a better place, it would be great to get paid more. But that's not going to happen and mostly likely is going to get worst for the regular floor nurse.
    *** Well I agree but it's kinda pointing out the obvious.

    Complaining is like beating a dead horse.
    *** Blowing off steam in a group of peers who understand the situation is healthy.

    Simply put... money makes the world go round. Just as much as people want more money in their pocket....corporations want to keep as much as they can in theirs. And with the Nursing shortage not really there, as you pointed out, there is someone in line waiting to take your spot for less money. Like it or hate it...it doesn't matter
    *** Sure but once again kinda pointing out the obvious.

    So yes...right now nurses are fairly compensated.
    *** That nurses wages are unlikely to increase in the forseable future is a fact. That we are fairly compensated is only your opinion.
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    [QUOTE=PMFB-RN;7055694

    *** That nurses wages are unlikely to increase in the forseable future is a fact. That we are fairly compensated is only your opinion.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, everything can be subjective. You have a right to your opinion. Hell, I can't think of one job that I didn't think I deserved more money, especially more than my peers who were doing less work, but getting paid the same. Life does suck. Really...I truely do understand the life is in your hands thing. I do see the picture, just my views go beyond.

    I do forsee wages dropping, as throughout the city here, beneifits are already being cut. It all about supply and demand. Why would you want to hear someone complain, when many others are eager to fill there shoes for less money.
    Honestly, in this economic climate, it is best to keep your head down and your mouth shut, and continue to perform above and beyond. I know what it's like to watch everyone around you get laid off, and your the last one standing. Nurses' salaries are quite atractive to the masses. It is very common to mearly 1/4 of class having students working towards a ASN, while already having a Master' degree in other fields, and even much more with Bachelors
    Last edit by eroc on Dec 3, '12
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    Gonna point out the obvious once again..in the terms of subjectivity.

    This thread was started with the question of "do you get tired of people saying nurses making big bucks?" The poster would have no reason the write anything up if the random people did not come up commenting on Nursing salaries.

    So, subjectively, the majority of all people think nurses are fairly compesated. (which is what provoked the write up)

    But you have nurses on the other hand claiming they are not.

    Both are subjective views, but when you compare objectively, there is more of a definate answer.
    And going back to trying to quantify it is going back to a subjective view. I agree life is very important, but people are going to die either way. Not causing death is of the utmost importance, but death is going to happen.

    "Subjective" is a really cool word so that people can voice an opinion. And more often than not objectivity gets tossed to the side when people have biased views.
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.


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