Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - pg.28 | allnurses

Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 28

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Not sure if this has been covered or not but compensation for nurses is largely a factor of COL in a particular area.

    New grads start here in NYC at mid $70K to low $80K per year. Now most anywhere else in the USA that would be "big money", but not so much in New York. High housing, taxes and other costs mean that $80K does not go as far as you might think.

    High housing costs are a huge problem for hospitals in NYC especially Manhattan. With rents for a small studio apartment on average >$1500 per month (and that won't be in a good building/nice area) to >$2K (better area and building) you can see where this is going.

    Sloane Kettering is building housing on Roosevelt Island, and IIRC NYP has a few buildings scattered around Manhattan including a new one on Second Avenue. Not sure if Mount Sinai still offers nurse housing. Still off of those efforts are drops in the bucket with nurses stressing they need higher wages to deal with this local economy.

    Nurses along with physicians and other licensed professionals are at least at the "top of the food chain" so to speak, and thus fare better than UAPs, techs, administrative, and so forth. There depending upon the facility wages can be "decent" to "good" but often no where near what they need to be considered a liveable wage. The head of NS-LIJ was interviewed as part of a news program about young Long Islanders fleeing after college because they cannot afford to remain. The man's point of view was NS-LIJ cannot fill and retain employees for such positions at what it considers very good wages. Now the compensation offered may very well be "good" in the eyes of that network, but considering the COL in LI and NYC some have other ideas.
    ICUman and LadyFree28 like this.
  2. Visit  A&Ox6 profile page
    2
    Quote from charli_appleRN
    What's really interesting is how the people who receive foodstamps are ashamed of them and people who dont receive them are jealous of the people that do. Public assistance does not a lottery winner make. There are no illusions about the cost of living. People apply for welfare because they cant afford the cost......not because they dont know the cost. Believe it or not, the majority of the working class poor would prefer to pay there own way and be broke rather than jump through the government's hoops every other month....and be broke.
    Also, I've heard so many nurses (and other healthcare workers) speak negatively about the people who buy chips with their food stamps. I happen to know of many people who buy such food because they either are homeless or live in a place that does not allow for cooking or safe food storage.

    For example, the price of an individual serving of yogurt is almost the same as a large container. However, if the consumer has no refrigerator, both are off limits.
    LadyFree28 and Fiona59 like this.
  3. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    3
    Quote from close the books
    Also, I've heard so many nurses (and other healthcare workers) speak negatively about the people who buy chips with their food stamps. I happen to know of many people who buy such food because they either are homeless or live in a place that does not allow for cooking or safe food storage.
    There are many families living in single room occupancy motel rooms such as the Motel 6 in this day and age, and these places are known for their lack of cooking facilities. Also, the motel dweller is lucky to even get a fridge. If they want perishable food but do not have a fridge, they must keep the items in a picnic chest covered with ice.

    So, yes, people without appropriate cooking facilities or refrigerators must eat heavily preserved, non-perishable foods to avoid the risk of spoilage and wasted money.
  4. Visit  corneliaabc profile page
    0
    Really after all this hard work and schooling someone will live from paycheck to paycheck and that is quality of life wow. I agree and i think if their was not a section 8 or foodstamps the white house would still have a way to continue to make us pay high taxes and wow this is really screwed up the real world i work two jobs to maintain a quality of life i want to live like a normal person i went to school and did every thing right im not complaining because we take care of people every day whom wish they just didnt have a terminal illness but wow that story was true but sad cause it is the facts of life, my GOD pls dont be so insensitive....... my head hurts because i have to study for nclex-rn im a lpn currently.
  5. Visit  kalevra profile page
    6
    CNA Carla is reliant on government asisstance. Her government subsidized living allows her to have many things paid for by others.

    RN Carla is not reliant on government assistance. Her larger income means she has to pay more in taxes. Her taxes then goes to pay the bills and food of CNA Carla.

    I dont know about anyone else here, but I am a firm believer in people being productive members of society. I believe people should pull their weight in society. I understand every now and then people need help, but it is another story to purposely not get a better paying job in order to live off of public welfare for the rest of their lives. You know who pays for these subsidies, the middle class tax payers.

    What does the working middle class get? The answer is more taxes levied on us.

    Whatever happened to pulling your own weight in society? What happened to personal responsibility? How is this acceptable to society?
    QuarterLife88, Fiona59, GM2RN, and 3 others like this.
  6. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    2
    Quote from kalevra
    it is another story to purposely not get a better paying job in order to live off of public welfare for the rest of their lives. You know who pays for these subsidies, the middle class tax payers.

    What does the working middle class get? The answer is more taxes levied on us.

    Whatever happened to pulling your own weight in society? What happened to personal responsibility? How is this acceptable to society?
    I know welfare for individual is the low hanging fruit that we can all see. But in reality it is only the tiniest drop in the bucket of subsidies. Much more is given to often rich corporations, like energy companies, factory farms, and the military-industrial complex. Even more is given to rich corporations disguised as "foreign aid".
    emtb2rn and LadyFree28 like this.
  7. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I know welfare for individual is the low hanging fruit that we can all see. But in reality it is only the tiniest drop in the bucket of subsidies. Much more is given to often rich corporations, like energy companies, factory farms, and the military-industrial complex. Even more is given to rich corporations disguised as "foreign aid".
    One wrong doesn't justify another.
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    3
    Quote from GM2RN
    One wrong doesn't justify another.
    I find this to be an extraordinary reply to my message. Had you not quoted me I would have to assume that you didn't read a word I said.
    While your comment seems 180 degrees off topic, I will agree with you. However complaining about a single snow flake while standing in a blizzard makes one look, at best uninformed, and at worst illogical.
    VampyrSlayer, Wheels28, and LadyFree28 like this.
  9. Visit  la_chica_suerte85 profile page
    4
    I live in California and you can look at our wages and think, yeah, there is some big money there. I can't imagine a nurse out here only being paid $3000/mo.

    ....however.

    You mention the sacrifice of schooling. The hazards of our jobs. The responsibilities that come with our license that cause significant personal and professional risk. The stress. The physical, mental, and emotional stability and strength that are required. The significant need to cope with all that we see and deal with. Then, as a student, there's the stress of wondering if I'm doing enough to make sure I have a job when I'm done with all of this.

    After my loans, the sacrifices I'm making to make sure I can win the race, it doesn't seem like enough. But, that's why I really can't do it for the money, right? But, a part of me is (has to, at this point) and I know the earning potential that comes in this state after certain qualifications and experience are gained. It's a long, long journey -- I'm doing it for the stories and the people (those I get to take care of and those I get to work with -- people are amazing and I love that this job will show me all sorts of amazing things).

    I love and live with a cop for whom the above rings true. They make tons of money -- on paper. But, for the amount of sacrifice that she and her LEO brothers and sisters give, it truly is not enough. The hollowness and exhaustion they feel at the end of a particularly grueling week -- the money doesn't even begin to make up for it (not that they have the energy to enjoy what they make anyway).

    So, is there money there? In my state and others like it, yes. It's a lot, especially for someone coming out of retail who essentially peaked at the ripe old age of 26. But, I know for all that I have the privilege of giving, the money doesn't even begin to pay me back (but I'm lucky to be in a place where, in spite of the immense competition for jobs, we are paid well enough to live). The stories, the people, the experiences -- no matter how wonderful or terrible -- will have to do.
    NickiLaughs, LadyFree28, Wheels28, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  TU RN profile page
    9
    Maybe this speaks to my upbringing, but a 22-24 year old kid just out of college making $30/hour as a RN is good money regardless of the job description.
  11. Visit  NickiLaughs profile page
    2
    Location has a huge influence. I'm probably pulling close to 140k this year, with a some OT. But I live in CA. Yes, it's hard to get a job here, because of the money. But even then, because of cost of living, I'm still middle class. I'm grateful though, i love my career, and can afford a mortgage, a nice car and things my kid wants/needs. Not everyone can say that. All medical staff should though, I had three coworkers punched a work today. Our job isn't exactly "cushy."
    la_chica_suerte85 and ICUman like this.
  12. Visit  ANRN2B profile page
    2
    I live in a depressed, rural area where the average wage falls roughly between minimum wage and $12.00/hr. for the majority. The cost of the average home is around $90,000. Once I successfully complete my hospital affiliated diploma program, pass nclex and begin at the hospital that employs ALL of its students (that want to work for them), the $25.00/hr the hospital starts its new grads at will seem like a financial windfall compared to the other $8.25-$12.00/hr jobs I myself have held within the medical field over the course of the last 15 or so years.

    It may not be considered "big money" to others, but it will be comfortable enough living for me.
    GM2RN and la_chica_suerte85 like this.
  13. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I find this to be an extraordinary reply to my message. Had you not quoted me I would have to assume that you didn't read a word I said.
    While your comment seems 180 degrees off topic, I will agree with you. However complaining about a single snow flake while standing in a blizzard makes one look, at best uninformed, and at worst illogical.
    Why is my reply extraordinary? Usually when someone makes a statement such as yours by pointing out what they feel is a greater injustice, it is an attempt to justify what they see as the lesser injustice. That's the way your post came across. My comment was only to say that they are both wrong and one shouldn't be allowed to continue because more money is spent on another wrong. Both should be appropriately addressed.

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