Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - pg.25 | allnurses

Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 25

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    Is it just me, or do you see a lot of nurses with loser husbands?
    YES! All the time. It has gotten to be quite the cliche. I am alwasy amazed at the storied I hear working night shift about the things nurses put up with from their husbands. My buddy and I often joke about starting a 1-800 number for nurses husbands.
    joanna73 likes this.
  2. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm sure you've heard of the phrase: "Nothing's better than a nurse with the purse."

    Yes, there are some small-minded men out there who prey on female nurses because they actually think our pockets are overflowing with cash.
    That sort of mindset has been going around for years, there was even a book turned into a motion picture based upon said theme; "Not As A Stranger".

    Not as a Stranger (1955) - IMDb

    1. Not As A Stranger - Robert Mitchum Olivia deHavilland 1955 Drama Romance Full Movie.flv - YouTube

    Quite a few pre-med and medical students back in the day latched onto nurses. While a she usually didn't earn much a nurse did have a steady income which had it's own appeal, but for some men with ambitions in the medical field such a marriage brought other benefits as well.

    A well respected and experienced nurse usually had some pull in a hospital and or other connection that could benefit her husband. While the usual choice then for a doctor's wife would be a physican's daughter and or a girl who came from money and social connections (all the better to fund a medical school education and help launch a practice), in a pinch a nurse would do just fine.

    Of course many of these men turned out to be the skirt chasing physicans we all probably know at least one. Between nurses, secretaries and any other woman laying around spare it was a wonder those doctors got to practice at all. OTHO many of the wives turned a blind eye because they were now "doctor's wives" with all the wealth and status that entailed.

    If and when things hit the fan and went to divource court allot depended upon the judge. Some former nurses were well compensated in the division of the marital estate when they could show how their contributions in the early years literally built their husband's practice into what it had become.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  3. Visit  nurse_pogi profile page
    1
    TOO bad for us nurses, we study four years in college took the board exam and yet until now a lot of our colleagues still having a hard time to look for their success .. !!! Lord please help us
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    3
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    Is it just me, or do you see a lot of nurses with loser husbands?
    Yes, I've observed numerous nurses in the area where I live who have slacker husbands. They're married to men who are unemployed, underemployed, or unmotivated. And yes, I think it has something to do with the 'fix it' syndrome.
    joanna73, redhead_NURSE98!, and Esme12 like this.
  5. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    To be fair, it's apparent that not everyone knows about the nursing glut. This is evidenced by bright-eyed pre-nursing students across the country who make statements such as "Nurses always have jobs," "Nursing is recession-proof," "There's a shortage of nurses," and "Nursing will always be in demand!"

    Yes, but I also think when it has been addressed in the media, people tended to blow it off as nonsense. All they have heard for so long is there is this big nursing shortgage. And while it is true that some places still could do better with staffing of nurses, they aren't going to because of budget constraints and concerns--one of which is concern re: healthcare changes.

    Overall people aren't getting that is it a whole different world/reality for nursing. So much is done outside of the hospital or on an outpatient basis, and stays are often so limited, there isn't as much of a need for nurses in-house.

    There have been some articles and pieces done on new grad nurses not being as able to procure jobs; but this either isn't getting a lot of play time, or people are just blowing it off.

    It's kind of like how people are stuck on the idea that most physicians are rich, and they already make too much money. While in certain instances this may be true, it's not overall. These people have very HUGE $200,000 and + medical school bills, do 3 or > (depending on specialty and need for BC) at a very nominal stipend pay (Thus delaying their income ability for years), and have a ton of other costs above that. Reimbursements are down, and anyone that goes into medicine thinking they will necessarily become a millionaire is dreaming. You can try to tell this to people until the cows come home. All they can think about are the outliers--or those folks that are get in the high roller specialties. The other physicians are often those invested well over their lifetimes. But these folks aren't anything close to hedgefund investors. Daily Finance says that " attorneys, doctors, or dentists, which only account for 2% of the millionaire pool." Surprising Job That Gets Many Americans Into the Millionaire Club - DailyFinance

    Millionaire Household Occupations

    Occupation Percent of Millionaires
    Manager 17%
    Educator 12%
    Sr. Corporate Executive 7%
    Business Owner 6%
    Accountant 4%
    Sales Person 4%
    Attorney 2%
    Doctor/Dentist 2%
    Source: Spectrem Group Millionaire Corner

    Yes, I was surprised by Educator too. They get an edge b/c of dual incomes. Getting to high income in higher education takes a lot. PhD, biding your time and playing the game, being well-published, etc.
  6. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    Yes, but I also think when it has been addressed in the media, people tended to blow it off as nonsense. All they have heard for so long is there is this big nursing shortgage. And while it is true that some places still could do better with staffing of nurses, they aren't going to because of budget constraints and concerns--one of which is concern re: healthcare changes.

    Overall people aren't getting that is it a whole different world/reality for nursing. So much is done outside of the hospital or on an outpatient basis, and stays are often so limited, there isn't as much of a need for nurses in-house.

    There have been some articles and pieces done on new grad nurses not being as able to procure jobs; but this either isn't getting a lot of play time, or people are just blowing it off.

    It's kind of like how people are stuck on the idea that most physicians are rich, and they already make too much money. While in certain instances this may be true, it's not overall. These people have very HUGE $200,000 and + medical school bills, do 3 or > (depending on specialty and need for BC) at a very nominal stipend pay (Thus delaying their income ability for years), and have a ton of other costs above that. Reimbursements are down, and anyone that goes into medicine thinking they will necessarily become a millionaire is dreaming. You can try to tell this to people until the cows come home. All they can think about are the outliers--or those folks that are get in the high roller specialties. The other physicians are often those invested well over their lifetimes. But these folks aren't anything close to hedgefund investors. Daily Finance says that " attorneys, doctors, or dentists, which only account for 2% of the millionaire pool." Surprising Job That Gets Many Americans Into the Millionaire Club - DailyFinance

    Millionaire Household Occupations

    Occupation Percent of Millionaires
    Manager 17%
    Educator 12%
    Sr. Corporate Executive 7%
    Business Owner 6%
    Accountant 4%
    Sales Person 4%
    Attorney 2%
    Doctor/Dentist 2%

    Source: Spectrem Group Millionaire Corner

    Yes, I was surprised by Educator too. They get an edge b/c of dual incomes. Getting to high income in higher education takes a lot. PhD, biding your time and playing the game, being well-published, etc.
    Actually in many areas of the USA nurses are out earning physicans, especially GPs.

    Many doctors especially those just starting out are being hurt financially by cuts to Medicare/Medicaid and insurance rates. Again this varies by practice but GPs, Peds, OB/GYN seem to be feeling the pinch hardest. OTHO some specalities do very well: The Best- And Worst-Paying Jobs For Doctors - Forbes
  7. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Actually in many areas of the USA nurses are out earning physicans, especially GPs.

    Many doctors especially those just starting out are being hurt financially by cuts to Medicare/Medicaid and insurance rates. Again this varies by practice but GPs, Peds, OB/GYN seem to be feeling the pinch hardest. OTHO some specalities do very well: The Best- And Worst-Paying Jobs For Doctors - Forbes
    Overall, however, I wouldn't say that was true--with the exception of some CRNAs topping some primaries. But even primary care can still make money--it just means seeing a lot more patients and putting in a lot more hours. Rural care FP in certain areas is paying pretty well too; b/c they have to function like the only game in town, and they just can't get people to go into some of these areas--not physicians OR NPs. I mean Alaska. . .a nice place to visit, but most don't want to live there.

    My point is, after the HUGE investment of time and energy and money (application process is not cheap either), and then upon entrance to med grad education, and then residency and fellowship, people in medicine aren't getting rich. But like nursing, you shouldn't go into for that.

    The lifestyle specialties are hard to match into, like opthamology, orthopedic surgery, dermatology, radiology. Those are the areas that have potential for high income. And I wouldn't necessarily say that Orthopedic surgery is the lifestyle kind of medicine in the same sense as the others--only that top players in that area can make a million per year. I mean those docs invest a lot of time well past post-grad and as attendings.

    Overall, the number of people in the US that are becoming millionaires has dropped since 2008. And many of those who were millionaires (earned) are no longer so.

    It's a whole new reality we are all going to have to accept.
  8. Visit  bubblejet50 profile page
    0
    I make a decent wage. I wont say im raking it in but I do earn enough to support myself and my family without federal aid and that should count for something. I work 3 days a week. Im home for my kids more often and dont have to worry about my funding being cut like I did when I was on welfare. Before prices started to rise I would say I was making good money. Now with gas and food prices increasing I find it more breaking even but thats more than a lot of my friends!
  9. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from bubblejet50
    I make a decent wage. I wont say im raking it in but I do earn enough to support myself and my family without federal aid and that should count for something. I work 3 days a week. Im home for my kids more often and dont have to worry about my funding being cut like I did when I was on welfare. Before prices started to rise I would say I was making good money. Now with gas and food prices increasing I find it more breaking even but thats more than a lot of my friends!
    Are you a two income household?

    Yes, I'm fearing inflation is going to hit all of us hard. Maybe not right away, but in the next several years. Everyone's taxes pretty much will have to go up. There aren't enough huge earners to make up the difference of what we need. Couple this with hyperinflation, and the stagnicity of salaries, well, it will not be what we had been used to.
  10. Visit  bubblejet50 profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8

    Are you a two income household?

    Yes, I'm fearing inflation is going to hit all of us hard. Maybe not right away, but in the next several years. Everyone's taxes pretty much will have to go up. There aren't enough huge earners to make up the difference of what we need. Couple this with hyperinflation, and the stagnicity of salaries, well, it will not be what we had been used to.
    I make over double what my husband does. So I pay the bills and he covers our "fun." We have a 4yr old and one due any day now.
  11. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from bubblejet50
    I make over double what my husband does. So I pay the bills and he covers our "fun." We have a 4yr old and one due any day now.
    OH, wow! Congratulations! A Christman/Hanukkah Baby! Hope you are feeling well. One of my sons' birthday is two days before Christmas.

  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    OH, wow! Congratulations! A Christman/Hanukkah Baby! Hope you are feeling well. One of my sons' birthday is two days before Christmas.

    and I was born on Christmas....! Happy Birthday to us all!!!!! Best wishes to the Momma to be!!!!
  13. Visit  nisteber profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    I am the first one to say that post-secondary schools are all about the money, but to your reply, well, I say wow.

    If you have noticed, however, most places now require or are pushing for BSN baseline for hiring. Far be it for me to tell people what to do, but people can also save money taking a number of general ed. courses and such at the community college and then transfering into a BSN program. I think in the future this should be the role of community colleges for nurses. Help get them started and prepare for transfer. Say whatever you want, but having solely a community college degree it generally frowned upon any more, and in some ways, that is a shame, b/c select community college nursing programs for RN have some great teachers and really good programs. My original school's graduates from ADN beat out GNs from ivy league universities on state board exams. Of course the program has had quite a few ups and downs since then. Overall, nursing will never be respected as a profession (whether you feel it is or not) without at least maintaining that baseline education involves a bachelor's of science in nursing. No other profession does what is done for RNs in this regard. You go into psychology, you need a baseline in the field and then you had better matriculate quickly into a graduate program if you want to work. You can't do OT, PT,teaching, and the like w/o a baseline bachelor's in the area. I'd say everything pretty much I took in bachelor's nursing science program was helpful and important. The things was, however, I went to a private university, and that's what stings in terms of cost. I did it strategically, however, b/c of current/future plans. I would not, however, say that everyone should take out all these loans for private universities for BSN. Go to a public university or see about as many scholarships as you can. In general, it is completely true that the cost of post-secondary education and graduate education is outlandish, period, end of story. Lots of students matriculated into four-year programs, however, take a good number of courses, such as general education, at the community college, and then transfer them back into their four-year programs.

    I just wish all these schools would put a freeze on tuition hikes, b/c they never cease to go up. This hurts nursing as a profession, b/c these folks will do the ADN to save money--some of them will continue on and get the full undergrad degree and up and a good number of them won't. But as long as people can get the ADN and take the RN boards and work, a good percentage will have little impetus to meet baseline educational requires, b/c, well, they have not been mandated as baseline. It is getting harder to get a position or to make vertical moves in the field w/o at least a BSN. This "requirement" has taken forever to implement, and it's nothing official.

    I will say that my private school added value to my approach and actual practice of nursing.
    Private school yikes. That sure does sound like it stings. Why the heck did you do that? Also the BSN will never become the baseline. Until they make the RN boards harder anyways. There is nothing learned in a BSN program that is needed on boards. There are some management things, but most of it is common sense. I know a lot of 40-60 year old nurses that still are working on the floor that have their BSNs. They are no better than nurses with ADNs.


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