Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 25

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

83,220 Views | 364 Comments

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, “You’re rolling in the big bucks!” To keep things honest, I’ll recall a few... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from NursieNurseLPN
    I was on medicaid and food stamps for a short time. I knew i needed to improve my life (and i felt guilty for recieving assistance, even though i truly needed it). So i sign up for nursing school, bc i always wanted to, and my being in school actually DISQUALIFIED me from my food stamps. So basically, what that told me was that if i stayed at home unemployed, doing nothing, i could receive benefits. But the second i try to better my life, im no longer eligible. I think thats sad, & thankfully i wanted better for myself. I think people should qualify while attending school & receiving great grades. We are more likely to give back to society when were working and paying taxes. All that said, i am very thankful for that short time in life where i needed help and medical benefits. I dnt know how i wouldve made it without that help & i can never begrudge someone for seeking help. But i believe there should be some sort of limit, or incentive to figure out a way to support ourselves asap. I am so proud of myself for being able to support myself, and i think in this day and age, if you can pay your bills- your successful & making enough. We may not always have money for extras, but we have enough for basics, and opportunities to earn more. Many people cannot pay that basic rent/mortgage. So IMO, just being able to afford that means we are doing OK. Never be "rich", but being able to maintain a life is enough for me. Damn shame though that they could cancel benefits bc you enroll in school. No wonder some people choose to stay at home on the couch..
    Personally, I don't think anyone should feel bad for asking for help if they are in the process of trying to better themselves. Don't feel guilty for that. It just isn't something to feel guilty about.

    As for the rest of your post I also believe that it's ridiculous to stop benefits for enrolling in school. Personally, I feel that enrolling in school (or another provable avenue to better yourself) should actually be a requirement for receiving assistance.

    I'm not a conspiracy theorist. I don't believe that "They" are out to get us, or go out of their way to keep us down. I also believe that when the "Rules" for receiving government assistance were put in place, the intention behind it all was noble. I really do. But the problem with this country is (and I'm not trying to sound unpatriotic, but if any of you really think our Government has gotten everything 100% right, well you have bigger problems than I am qualified to address) that intentions just don't matter in these situations. Everything is followed to the letter, spirit be damned. And the problem with doing things this way is that it creates loopholes in just about anything. After all, even if (hypothetically) these programs were written perfectly at the time, time changes and with it the circumstances that pushed these bills into place change as well. Then, what was a perfect solution at the time is already outdated by the time said solution is implemented. And these loopholes, at one extreme allow people abuse the system, and at the other extreme hold back many who are actually trying to better themselves. Unfortunately, the latter are the people who need, or more appropriately, deserve help in doing so.
    eroc likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from joanna73
    Also, consider this: just how much is a life worth? When people make comparisons about nursing and "similar" occupations....well unless you're referring to another occupation within the health care arena, it isn't the same at all. Nurses and other health care professionals deserve every cent they earn, and then some. Most other fields are not concerned with promoting health and saving lives.
    It is kind of pointless to compare professions. I was just thinking today that I'm really glad I didn't become a teacher which I'm qualified to do. I used to think it was a great job because I would be able to work when my children were in school and be home when they were out of school, etc.

    Then, the reality is that I would've made the same pay as a teacher as a nurse (at least where I live) except when working as a nurse, your job is done when you clock out. Teachers always have to do work at home whether it's grading papers, making plans, emailing parents, or buying/gathering supplies. So, even though the pay is about the same, the hours really are not. I'm sure it's the same with many jobs where your work is never really done when you go home.
    joanna73 likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from eroc
    I'm taking my N-clex in two weeks. Will start my BSN in the summer. (online) Plan on getting DNP (My GPA is pretty high)
    Not unionized...there is only onehospital here in town that is. Telemetry to start. Cost of living is low here..compared to most places.
    Congratulations. I started in telemetry. Man that was one wicked and wild floor, but there we had a pretty good team, and the mger wasn't a pita. It was a good experience, and I moved into critical care from there, but I was always glad for that experience. It really helped build my thinking skills, clinical judgment skills, and it gave me good exposure to a great diversity of pts and conditions, even though it was a tele med/surg floor. You can have a good number of codes on a tele med/surg floor. We used to say we were running mini ICUs on the floor, b/c the units were too backed up, and things could just get a little crazy out of nowhere. We had a crazy night crew too, and it was pretty much great working with them. We OD'd on the OT, b/c it was always available back then, and many of us we just young 20's out of school.

    It's a good place for most new grads. I'll tell you one thing, no one that works on such floors should ever take anything for granted; b/c things can change pretty quickly there, and although a number of pts are on tele, you turn your head and the floor starts rocking. On top of that, beware of empty beds. LOL, they often don't stay that way very long.


    That's great that COL is low where you are, b/c that can make a big difference IMO.

    Good luck on NCLEX. I'm sure you'll do great.
    anotherone likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Any competent RN can make $100K+/year not counting OT. Of course it would involve doing things most don't wish to do, primarily relocating but also working nights and half or more weekend.

    Most nurses aren't going to make 100K+ w/o OT or a second job; it doesn't matter how competent they are unless they live in Cali or NYC, where the cost of living is quite high, and where commutes can be a killer.

    Now, if you work certain travel agencies, especially during strike times you might--but you can bet there will be OT. Otherwise, usually the travel jobs that pay the highest are like in Alaska or the upper and outer reaches of North Dakota, and certain areas of Cali, as well as some specialized hard to fills.

    Many nurses are also trying to go back to school, and working and maintaining a 4.0 is tough--done that and am doing that again---not going to make six figures w/o hurting the gpa. That's private school for you, and the area I'm looking to advance into is incredibly competitive, so. . . . You make compromises, but you can only work within certain parameters for your life. I am, however, thinking of doing some travel nursing after the next term.

    2010 Median Pay $64,690 per year
    $31.10 per hour

    Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics: Registered Nurses : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

    Payscale puts median RN salaries in the US at > $40,000 to $79,900. Salaries move up by way of OT and the like--that is, if you can get it.
    http://www.payscale.com/research/US/...N)/Hourly_Rate
    anotherone likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    It is kind of pointless to compare professions. I was just thinking today that I'm really glad I didn't become a teacher which I'm qualified to do. I used to think it was a great job because I would be able to work when my children were in school and be home when they were out of school, etc.

    Then, the reality is that I would've made the same pay as a teacher as a nurse (at least where I live) except when working as a nurse, your job is done when you clock out. Teachers always have to do work at home whether it's grading papers, making plans, emailing parents, or buying/gathering supplies. So, even though the pay is about the same, the hours really are not. I'm sure it's the same with many jobs where your work is never really done when you go home.

    Well, lol, did you see all the Buffalo teachers that are getting free plastic surgery.

    Buffalo, NY teachers get free plastic surgery | todaysthv.com
    Last edit by samadams8 on Nov 29, '12
  6. 1
    Honey you would be a fool to say you wouldnt be a nurse for the money. people that i know are nurses and do it for the money a job is a job . I went from no salary to something.. Thats your opinion though. Im still a great nurse as well but need survival off of the money
    anotherone likes this.
  7. 0
    Also people on here will not say how much they make. people lie honey I know alot of nurses that get payed very well higher than doctors..
  8. 1
    Quote from samadams8
    Well, lol, did you see all the Buffalo teachers that are getting free plastic surgery.

    Buffalo, NY teachers get free plastic surgery | todaysthv.com
    That's crazy. Nothing that happens in places like NY really surprises me though.

    It really makes me wonder what the district stands to lose though that they're willing to let the free plastic surgery issue slide by in order to avoid negotiations. Obviously, the price of the surgeries are less than whatever the price of the negotiations would be or else they'd be ALL over that.
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  9. 1
    Quote from Aongroup1990
    Honey you would be a fool to say you wouldnt be a nurse for the money. people that i know are nurses and do it for the money a job is a job . I went from no salary to something.. Thats your opinion though. Im still a great nurse as well but need survival off of the money
    A mere misuderstanding.. . I have repeatedly made the point that nurses should be fairly and adequately compensated, in fact, as you read through, my repeated point is that they are not fairly and adequated compensated for experience, long-term service, and proper merit analyses. . .among other things. I've made this point ad nauseum here.

    I think a person should not go into this field thinking monetary first and foremost without any genuine interest in it or people or even the merging of the applied sciences and compassionate advocacy. To me, at least, advocacy is job one for nurses. Safety is a part of that, and with safety comes developed competence--and the competence should primarily be because you care.

    There are plenty of other things for which one could go to college. If a person's heart is truthfully and realistically not in it, I say do the patients, society, and yourself a favor and find something else. Now if your heart and interest is in it, go for it--go hog wild in nursing. Nursing needs caring, ethusiastic, bright, and energetic people.

    Having said that, OF COURSE nurses should be properly compensated--and unless the hospital is in major financial hardship, I believe nurses should receive cost of living raises, and then the should have more objective systems and practices for merit-analysis and awards. Of course this time-consuming for them, and it adds to the cost beyond the award compensation--that is, until it was adequately worked into the system and people actually knew what they were doing with it. It would also require administration and management to not play so many capricious games, given the more objective system was truly that and applied with balance and consistency.

    Have I stated it better this time?


    The only nurses that get paid better than certain kinds of ATTENDING physicians are, for the most part, CRNAs. Post-graduate doctors in residency and fellowship get low salaries b/c it more like it is a stipend. Residency and fellowship backing for post-grad medical training is a whole other can of beans.

    Other than that, a nurse that has a great batting average in pharm sales and medicial device sales can do quite well. But at that point, you aren't really nursing anymore, you are selling medical and pharmaceutical stuff.


    Also, I'm beginning to wonder how I'm referred to as honey, more than once, on this thread, when I don't even have an image or avatar going on with my username.
    Last edit by samadams8 on Nov 30, '12
    anotherone likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from eroc
    Yes I agree...I didn't want to start another debate that many are adamant about ;-) But a higher degree is the EASIEST way to advance getting your foot in the door. Having an ASN means you have excel on every level vs the "credentails" of the higher degree.
    Yes, I can agree with this. When the hiring manager must make a decision between two equally qualified candidates who both interviewed very well and have virtually the same experiential background, in this day and age they'll usually select the person with the higher level of education and credentials. One of the only ways to get around this is to personally know someone in the organization who can call shots.
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    But I wonder: Is a DON really a "white collar" job? It seems more like a solidly nursing (and thus "pink collar") job to me.
    My current DON/CNO (chief nursing officer) is a man. I consider the DON position more white collar than pink collar because DONs don't punch time clocks, have lots of autonomy, are upper managers, earn six-figure salaries in many states, and require the education, credentials, and experience to be hired into their roles.


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