Do male nurses get less abuse than females by nursing supervisors and patients ? - page 4

My aunt (RN) was telling me that in her experience male nurses tend to not get yelled at as often and in general receive less abuse from fellow co-workers, supervisors, and patients. I am a male and... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    I worked for a hospital in Dallas where a nursing supervisor physically pushed a CNA up against the wall and screamed at her in a panic over a patient who fell out of bed. There were 4 agency nurses, the charge nurse and an RT who were in the room trying to get the patient back in bed.
    The next day after a complaint was filed by the CNA, we were short staffed because 3 of the 4 agency nurses got their contracts cancelled and were no longer allowed to work there. The only agency nurse that stayed miraculously "didn't see anything" when the incident occured. All of the others backed up the complaint by the CNA. The charge nurse also was eventually fired and reported to the board on bogus charges after months of harassment and scrutiny over her work. The RT also backed up her story and how he remained employed there was a mystery to me except maybe that he wasn't under nursing authority.
    I'm very happy to say that the one agency nurse who "didn't see anything" eventually got hers.
  2. by   nursemike
    Quote from RN34TX
    I worked for a hospital in Dallas where a nursing supervisor physically pushed a CNA up against the wall and screamed at her in a panic over a patient who fell out of bed. There were 4 agency nurses, the charge nurse and an RT who were in the room trying to get the patient back in bed.
    The next day after a complaint was filed by the CNA, we were short staffed because 3 of the 4 agency nurses got their contracts cancelled and were no longer allowed to work there. The only agency nurse that stayed miraculously "didn't see anything" when the incident occured. All of the others backed up the complaint by the CNA. The charge nurse also was eventually fired and reported to the board on bogus charges after months of harassment and scrutiny over her work. The RT also backed up her story and how he remained employed there was a mystery to me except maybe that he wasn't under nursing authority.
    I'm very happy to say that the one agency nurse who "didn't see anything" eventually got hers.
    Are there no hungry lawyers in Texas? We're studying the big Tulia drug bust in my Race, Class, and Gender course. That, and some of the stories on these boards, make me pretty darned proud of my "insignificant, little state." But I gotta believe there's an attorney somewhere in Texas who would see an incident like this as a new Mercedes, ripe for the picking. But even if you don't believe in litigation for fun and profit (which, truthfully, I don't) the nursing supervisor could very reasonably have been sent to jail for his or her battery of the CNA. I hope the CNA wasn't injured, so I don't see a lot of financial damages there, but everyone who was retaliated against did have a cause of action and a right to be compensated for their monetary losses. Also lots of room for federal civil and criminal charges, and those don't matter what state you are in.
    Damn--I really don't want to go to law school, but things like this make it hard to resist.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from hipab4hands
    verbal and physical assaults are not reported, because we are brained wash to believe that it isn't nice for the nurse to make waves for the docs-"do you really believe the doc was trying to hurt you or do you really want this to go on their record?"
    nurses, who do report on these incidents see to be targeted by management afterwards, - change of assignment, more frequent evals, etc., as a means of discouraging others from reporting it.

    i have reported docs for verbal abuse and insisted that it be made part of their work record. if any of them tried to physically assault me, my first call would be to 911, not administration.
    i worked with a lovely woman in spokane -- she was agency and was finally allowed into the icu because we were so short staffed. she said she had lots of l & d experience -- in fact, she used to be the manager. until one day, a doc had a screaming fit followed up by slamming a nurse up against the wall. the manager witnessed the situation, wrote up the doc, called the police and had him arrested. as a result, both she and the nurse who was assaulted were fired, and charges were dropped since no one else saw anything. (yeah, right).

    another place, there was a doc who used to get likkered up and come to work where he'd verbally abuse the nursing staff and on more than one occaision punched a nurse. nothing ever happened. the nursing supervisors would always talk the nurse out of writing it up or calling the police. then one day he decked a doc --- and he went to jail. go figure!
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    IN the case like above, it would be time to hire an attorney, and sue both the doctor AND hospital. I would in that case, in a New York minute. Esp since there WERE witnesses, and unless they were ALL to lie under oath, I would stand a good chance of making someone pay for this, and stopping future incidents (which would be of the utmost importance, to me). In this case, the hospital is highly culpable, too. I would go after em all. If that makes me "evil" so be it. No one is gonna get away w/assaulting me, if I can help it. Being a "nurse" does not mean "doormat". :angryfire
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 3, '05

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