Do LPN's get the pay they deserve? - page 6

I am an LPN in SW Missouri. I make $11.50 an hour. I do 90% of the same job that the RN's do on my floor. Am I whining? Do LPN's really get what they deserve? Does LPN really stand for Low Paid... Read More

  1. by   live4today
    Quote from Pedsnrs2003
    I am an LPN in SW Missouri. I make $11.50 an hour. I do 90% of the same job that the RN's do on my floor. Am I whining? Do LPN's really get what they deserve? Does LPN really stand for Low Paid Nurse?
    Not only do LPNs "not get the pay they deserve", but neither do RNs. I'm all for nurses across the board having wages to match the work we do...especially in today's healthcare system which pretty much sucks!
  2. by   jannecdote
    Quote from RN34TX
    Maybe I don't understand your comments because my hospital does not use LPN/LVN's and as an RN I never had to be responsible for them.
    However, I was an LPN for 6 years before getting my RN and I've heard it over and over how the RN has the ultimate responsibility and accountability.
    In my LPN years, whenever MD's orders were missed, doctors needed to be called, meds omitted, stuff from previous shift not completed, etc.
    I do not recall ONE single RN ever stepping up to the plate and taking on this so-called ultimate responsibility. It was my job to handle theses issues. It was me, not the RN, who would be written up and held responsible if these things did not get done.
    So what RN are all of you referring to that is so ultimately responsible?
    The charge nurse? Too many (not all) I've worked with feel that their job is merely to answer the phone and make out the next shifts assignment. As an LPN I was left to handle my own patients unless a bag of blood needed to be hung.
    The nursing supervisor? They rarely have any clue as to what's going on with an LPN's patients unless a serious error or situation has already occurred. Too late then isn't it?
    I did work in one hospital that didn't allow LPN's to call MD's or give IV push meds which will make life more difficult for the RN's but whose fault is that?
    This is because many RN's want to keep LPN's in their place and if you widened their scope of practice in states where it is too narrow they are afraid that they will be replaced by LPN's. This thinking of course is ridiculous because you cannot run a hospital without RN's, period.
    As an LPN I've heard the RN's groan about doing the extra tasks that a hospital or state will not allow an LPN to do, but if state boards and hospitals want to keep a limited scope of practice and not allow LPN's to do things that they are perfectly capable of doing, then the RN's will have to take on the extra workload.
    By the way, that "low level of education" comment was a little offensive. Not everyone is cut out to be or have the opportunity to pursue BSN and CCRN credentials.
    Well said.
  3. by   3skilled
    I must agree with Jannecdote on a few matters #1 is the fact that IV pushes are RN job which does in fact make my job difficult D/T finding one,also, the papertrail errors ultimately fall on LPN'S Where i work the saying from RN to LPN is s**t rolls down hill!! Also I wouldn't be me if I didn't add to the Emailer who refered to us as "low education" Some RN's at my side i wonder how they got their degree,also i truly hope that comment does not reflect your bedside manner, Its hard sometimes But, we should all remember where we came from!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Last edit by 3skilled on Sep 6, '04
  4. by   RN34TX
    Quote from 3skilled
    I must agree with Jannecdote on a few matters #1 is the fact that IV pushes are RN job which does in fact make my job difficult D/T finding one,also, the papertrail errors ultimately fall on LPN'S Where i work the saying from RN to LPN is s**t rolls down hill!! Also I wouldn't be me if I didn't add to the Emailer who refered to us as "low education" Some RN's at my side i wonder how they got their degree,also i truly hope that comment does not reflect your bedside manner, Its hard sometimes But, we should all remember where we came from!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    My very last job as an LVN I was allowed to push everything that could be pushed on a med/surg floor except for cardiac meds like Dig or Cardizem. It saved me so much time and effort. I used to spend so much time finding an RN to do theses things when I lived in places that had a narrower scope of practice for LPN/LVN's.
    And believe it or not, LPN/LVN's can push IV drugs without hurting or killing patients despite their "low level of education!!"
    If I had a hard time finding someone who wasn't too busy, I would be told how it was my responsibility to make sure that it gets done. I would tell my managers "I cannot force an RN to do these tasks if they just will not do them." Same with initial admission assessments, etc. I always wondered why it was my responsibility to make sure that the RN does these things that I was not allowed to do.
    Just who is supervising who?
    That's like telling the CNA/PCT that in addition to their regular CNA duties, they need to make sure that their LVN's and RN's are giving all of their meds to their patients even though they themselves are not qualified to perform those tasks.
    I just think that it's crazy that many (not all, like myself) RN's are against LPN/LVN's doing what they consider to be RN level skills and yet they groan and complain whenever you ask them to do them for your patients.
    If you want this long list of exclusive things that only RN's can do, then I guess you're going to have to get your butt down to that LPN's patient's rooms and get busy doing all of these tasks that you don't want LPN's doing.
    Somebody has to do them and clearly these particular RN's don't want LPN's to do them, so who's left to hang blood and give IV pushes?
  5. by   Mandy368
    I agree! that is definitely not enough.... I am from Canada (which is known for not paying near as well as the states, in general) and I am working as a PSW (HCA) in a LTC facility while in school for my RPN (LPN) (which is a 2 year program here) and am making over $15/hr, and have only been there about 6 months. Granted, my Canadian money isn't worth near as much as American, but still! I needed no education for my job....
    so altogether, YES, I totally agree, and think that is awful that they underpay you so much!
  6. by   lady_jh_98
    I've been a nurse for a 1 1/2 yrs; employed at a hospital in Louisiana. My base pay is $13.18/hr. The night differential is $3.00/hr and the weekend differential is $2.00/hr. So I make anywhere from $15.18 - 18.18/hr as an Lpn
  7. by   LPN1974
    I work for the state, where I'm at. I make 18.52/hr. Been there 25 yrs as of 28th of next month.
    I am topped out on my pay. Meaning no more raises, for the grade that I'm in.
    They won't even give us a COL. Our fine republican governor has stopped even that. All I can get is a bonus, which you can't even qualify for that if your supervisor doesn't want you to have it.
    If I want any extra money, I really just have to take on a part time job to get it, and then uncle sam is going to get a good portion of that, since Im single.
    You just can't win for losing.
  8. by   HisAlone
    I'm an LPN who is overworked and overpaid, but what LPN or RN or CNA or ... isn't? (LOL). If you find someone who isn't, getting all frantic about it isn't going to add a single day to your life. Healthcare is life in the fast lane and I wouldn't want it any other way. But it is also the most soul-satisfying work to be had. I remember a night when I was a student doing my clinicals, watching an RN in ICU push an IV med and seeing the immediate effect displaying on the cardiac monitor. Right then and there I was struck by a sense of respect for RNs that has never left me. There are great RNs out there and there are lousy RNs out there - just as there are great LVNs and lousy LVNs. I am always disturbed by stereotyping, either implied or assumed, in online forums. My philosophy is to treat everyone with respect, manage your professional relationships well without letting your emotions control you, and do your job to the best of your ability. That way at least you can feel good about yourself. If the job does not fulfill your desires, either financially or otherwise (i.e. Rodney Dangerfield stuff :-), then leave and find a place that does. Yes, it may feel risky, especially when you have little ones at home showing their throats like a nest of baby birds. But the alternative is an exhausted, frustrated, angry, burned-out shell that loses it's value in the home in ways even more important than $$$. When I start in a new job, I'm not the only one who is "on probation". I put the organization on my own probation and I have high expectations. If I find a deficit, I analyze the chances of whether or not I-me-myself can affect a positive change in order to resolve it. I am always amazed at those that limit themselves to a job they hate and grouse about year after year, especially when nursing right now is a veritable smorgasboard of opportunities! Acute hospital, LTC, home care, hospice, dialysis, mental health, clinics, parish nurse, community health, and on and on and on. If your state doesn't pay well or has scope limitations you disagree with - move to another if it's feasible. Take your pick, its ALL good! Nursing (and Life) is what you make of it.
  9. by   brwnngj
    Quote from HisAlone
    I'm an LPN who is overworked and overpaid, but what LPN or RN or CNA or ... isn't? (LOL).
    Sure you didn't mean underpaid lol
  10. by   shopgal
    I am an LPN on a long-term vent unit and my job is no different than the RN's jobs, I do all IVs and so on. I make $18.54/hr., I graduated in 2003, so I am at the top of my pay scale LPNwise. But the RNs who do less than I do make $28-32/hr., that is why I am currently enrolled in RN school, to get paid $10 more/hr. to do the exact same job that I am doing now.
  11. by   shopgal
    To answer your question, NO, as an RN, you do not get paid enough to be responsible for someones else' patients. LPNs get paid enough in my opinion realted to their low level of education and limited scope of practice.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington[/QUOTE]

    No, this statement is just too ignorant to warrant a reply, you need to be a little open minded to be an effective nurse. I am certainly glad that I don't have to work with you or have any of my family members cared for by you. I guess ignorance is your bliss.
  12. by   GN1974
    Most nurses are underpaid! LPN's should however not receive the same wage as the RN--just because you do "the same job" does not mean you hold the same title. I was an LPN for a decade before completing my RN degree--the level of responsiblity is greater for the RN. I loved my job as an LPN--but I wanted the added pay so I went back to get the RN degree. I don't mean to sound indifferent but sometimes I get tired of hearing LPN's say I do the same thing so I should get the same pay--go back to school and you will see the differences between the two levels of nurses as well as the increase in the pay! I always thought I knew what the RN did...I proved myself wrong. The added responsiblity alone demands more pay. I do however think that basically all nurses are underpaid for what we do!
    Karen
  13. by   HisAlone
    brwnngj,

    Ooops! Thanks for catching that typo (LOL).

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