Do I push out the air bubble? - page 2

As a new nurse, I remember an argument on my unit questioning whether or not to inject lovenox whith the air bubble. My nurse educator at the time put an end to the question and explained that the... Read More

  1. by   Been there,done that
    "My nurse educator at the time put an end to the question ". Well now, there was your answer.
    You have much bigger fish to fry. Use your critical thinking skills. That small of an air bubble will not be significant , even if it given through the IV route.

    Pick your battles. Many more to come.
  2. by   hherrn
    Quote from evastone
    As a new nurse, I remember an argument on my unit questioning whether or not to inject lovenox whith the air bubble. My nurse educator at the time put an end to the question and explained that the air bubble remains in the syringe to be injected after the medication so that lovenox is pushed deeper into the tissue and would prevent bruising.

    Recently, this issue was brought up again. Apparently, all the nurses at another hospital get rid of the air bubbles because all air bubbles are dangerous. It made me wonder if I have been giving lovenox the wrong way. Do I push out the air bubble or not?
    I would stay I away from anything that starts with "I was always taught", or "From what I hear..".
    Even a simple Google search of "Lovenox air bubble" beets that. Actually, it gets you exactly what you want without even following a link.

    "*NOTE: Patients should be lying down and LOVENOX® administered by deep subcutaneous (SC) injection. To avoid the loss of drug when using the 30 mg and 40 mg prefilled syringes, do not expel the air bubble from the syringe before the injection."
  3. by   emmjayy
    I remember being so freaked out by the air bubble in the Lovenox syringe the first time I gave it - but when I was researching the med prior to giving it the manufacturer's instructions said to keep the bubble, and my clinical instructor confirmed that for me so now I don't worry about it
  4. by   Dranger
    I never thought of these things when I was a bedside nurse lol, how exactly would a tiny air bubble being injected into the subq layer cause any harm?
  5. by   student_B
    Quote from TriciaJ
    My understanding was to let the bubble float to the plunger end of the barrel, then inject it last. It will help clear the last bit of medication from the syringe so the patient gets the whole dose.
    This was recently emphasized to us in NS, and aligns with the mfr recommendations.
    I don't think much, if any, of the air bubble escapes the needle tip, it's probably calibrated to fully empty the syringe and needle of medication (expensive drug).
  6. by   ambrosepr
    Medication question: has anyone ever been told that identifying meds is not within nursing scope of practice?
  7. by   Ambersmom
    I inject with the air bubble. The air bubble is there to ensure the lovenox is correctly administered into the subcutaneous tissue. If you read the instructions that come with lovenox it clearly indicates this.
  8. by   Tenebrae
    Quote from evastone
    ....

    Recently, this issue was brought up again. Apparently, all the nurses at another hospital get rid of the air bubbles because all air bubbles are dangerous. It made me wonder if I have been giving lovenox the wrong way. Do I push out the air bubble or not?
    Using logic, how much damage do you think a tiny air bubble is going to cause going into subcut layer?

    The bubble helps ensure that all the medication is given
  9. by   hherrn
    Quote from ambrosepr
    Medication question: has anyone ever been told that identifying meds is not within nursing scope of practice?
    Well, I am pretty sure that identifying your medication is kind of important.
    On the other hand, if you have the right patient, time, dose, and route, that is 80%.

    I am guessing I don't understand the question.

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