DNR means Do Not Treat

  1. 0
    There needs to be some time devoted on educating people on what exactly a DNR is....So many people have the idea that DNR means do not treat.......

    Example: A DNR patient goes into a 3rd degree block.....The nurses call the
    family to tell them to come say their goodbyes.....

    How about the options available> Pacemaker


    Example: A patient gets IV Narcotics and 30 minutes later, they go into resp. depression....Nobody thinks to revers the narc...She's a DNR.....

    How about reversing the Narcs or look for the cause and treat the resp depression.

    Anyone else feels as i do? There needs to be some serious education into what a DNR actually is. Id say 8 out of 10 nurses believe its a do not treat....
  2. 33 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I think it depends on the overall situation. Also are they DNR CCA or DNR CCO, this makes a difference. What were the pts wishes regarding pacemakers and meds? I think you are generalizing too much here, or I do not have enough information to see your point.
  4. 0
    I don't think 8/10 nurses think that way..a lot depends on the individual pt,diagnosis,ect...terminal DNR definately lean towards comfort measures..but ALWAYS consult MD with any problems or changes in status.
  5. 0
    Quote from bsnrnoh
    I think it depends on the overall situation. Also are they DNR CCA or DNR CCO, this makes a difference. What were the pts wishes regarding pacemakers and meds? I think you are generalizing too much here, or I do not have enough information to see your point.
    The patients wishes were never taken into consideration....A DNR was seen, and then a attitude of do not treat.........
  6. 0
    i agree with you for the most part. i work with the elderly who are often bedridden, non-verbal, and failing to thrive. i respect family wishes when they don't wish for their family member to go through any more procedures, tests, etc. but a good point has been made when their condition may be caused by the care itself.

    Quote from bsnrnoh
    I think it depends on the overall situation. Also are they DNR CCA or DNR CCO, this makes a difference. What were the pts wishes regarding pacemakers and meds? I think you are generalizing too much here, or I do not have enough information to see your point.
  7. 0
    It is frustrating when people can't distinguish between a DNR on a patient with impending death and a DNR patient. If I go into the hospital for any reason I'm a DNR, so are my parents, but I expect we should be treated for our medical conditions within reason.
  8. 0
    Admitted an acute MI to the surgical floor last night. Troponin 6.6 with a BNP of over 2500. But since she is a DNR, rather than transfer someone out of tele, or ICU, we'll just put her on the surgical floor. Wish I knew what the follow up was today.
  9. 0
    I used to think DNR meant no more treatment except pain meds. I know better now. The last couple of places I've worked; DNR meant all treatments appropriate except a "code blue". Exceptions were terminal hospice in-patients where we considered every treatment to focus on comfort first but I can't imagine not reversing too much narcotic with some narcan. I can't imagine even with a hospice terminal patient at least not offering a pacemaker after explaining what it entailed and that it was likely a terminal rhythm without treatment (I have seen patients in chronic 3rd degree HB walking around defying the textbooks).
  10. 0
    I think alot of the MD's thing DNR means do not treat, pt has an acute problem any infection, pick an infection, you treat it. You know how many times I've gotten"They are 90 yrs old what do you want me to do? They are a DNR" My response? Thats why so many families are making these 90 yr old people FULL CODES you jack a$$" Then its you will order an antibiotic (or whatever is needed) or I'm calling the medical Director!
    UGHHHH
    Cheryl
  11. 0
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I was taught that a DNR would mean NO HEROIC MEASURES to save a patient's life. A pacemaker is NOT a heroic measure.


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