Dismissed from nursing program - page 2

I was dismissed from a nursing program because I failed two nursing courses and I wanted to know has this ever happened to you and were you able to get into other nursing program? If so please give... Read More

  1. by   RavenC
    Quote from abbylee1211
    It seems like a really bad idea to lie about the OP's previous education/experience. Many schools put a clause on the bottom of their application that you have to sign, stating that all facts & information you've listed is both TRUTHFUL & COMPLETE and that your application & enrollment can be revoked if evidence is found to the contrary.

    It is better to be honest & be responsble for your actions. Even if you failed 2 classes, you must be mature enough to admit that fact, and explain why you'll be able to do better this time. Don't get caught up in lies & stories -- do you really want to pretend like that to your fellow classmates & teachers? How about to yourself?
    I agree...if you lie you'll always be looking over your shoulder. And if you get called into the office for something, panic would set in. Besides, better to not get into nursing school than have to explain to the next school or employer why you were dismissed again. Lying is such a bad thing. It really goes to character and nursing schools are big on that.
  2. by   abbylee1211
    VRNH:

    another thing that was occuring to me... do you really want to start again somewhere fresh pretending not to know any skills? it will be embarassing, frustrating, and even a bit degrading not to be able to step up & say "YES, I know how to do this..." and this is NOT something you will be able to do if you don't say you've been in NS before.

    also, some schools ask you to map out what you've been doing in the past X years. you'll end up having to lie about the last few years, or throw in some alien abduction story! I worked briefly as a recruiter -- and I swear it is the MOST obvious thing we check for when verifying employment or education. And SO many people lie about it. Geesh. STOP people!
  3. by   classicdame
    Have you really exhausted all the schools in your area? I would approach the Dean and propose that you be on probation for a semester. State you are even willing to sign a contract to that effect, if necessary. You will need to make an appointment to see the Dean. Be sure to dress appropriately and do not make excuses or say anything derogatory about your previous educators/schools. Just state you had some personal problems that are now resolved and you are willing to do whatever it takes to realize your goal. Another option would be to get another type of career for a short while, like surgical tech or phlebotomist or something else that is health related. A stable study/work history will be of great value to you.
  4. by   oneLoneNurse
    I failed a course in RN school, but was asked to retake it the next year after taking sometime off to work in LTC. I just can't imagine them not wanting you back, BUT guess there is now no vacancy rate when it comes to nursing schools.
  5. by   I_am_Julia
    it's not pretending. she's trying to make a way for herself.

    Quote from abbylee1211
    it seems like a really bad idea to lie about the op's previous education/experience. many schools put a clause on the bottom of their application that you have to sign, stating that all facts & information you've listed is both truthful & complete and that your application & enrollment can be revoked if evidence is found to the contrary.

    it is better to be honest & be responsble for your actions. even if you failed 2 classes, you must be mature enough to admit that fact, and explain why you'll be able to do better this time. don't get caught up in lies & stories -- do you really want to pretend like that to your fellow classmates & teachers? how about to yourself?
  6. by   gitterbug
    I am sorry for your misfortune. I cannot advise you to be dishonest in attempting to apply to another school, things do come back to bite you when you are dishonest. Have you thought about working a year, applying to a LPN school and then later on getting the RN? It may take longer than you planned but it seems there are many issues you have to deal with and a little time to take care of them may save stress later. I cannot tell you to disclose to a LPN program regarding the past schooling, only you can decide that. Good luck.
  7. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from medic2ernurse2b
    If nursing is what you really want, then you may want to consider enrolling in Excelsior College. There is a lot of info in the distance learning forum. You may be eligible to enroll if you have completed at least 50% of traditional nursing school. But let me warn you right away that it is not for everybody. You have to be VERY motivated and disciplined, you cannot be a procrastinator, and you need to be able to learn the material independently. You can study on your own time and schedule your exams at Pearson Testing Centers when you feel you are ready, but you also have to take a 3-day practical exam at the end which costs $1800 and has about a 60-70% pass rate. If you want more info go to www.excelsior.edu.
    I would not recommend this option for the OP. It is a very stressful program, and not suited for most students. If she had a hard time with a conventional program, this one may be even more difficult. Plus, she still has to get through the hurdle of getting into a traditional school of nursing.
  8. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from TraumaICURN
    Is there not a way that a college can find out if you previosuly attended anywhere else if you don't disclose it???
    I think it would be very hard to keep it a secret for long, and if the program found out, it could be very bad for the student. It would make the student look less than honest, at the very least, and could be grounds for expulsion. Then it's back to square one all over again.
  9. by   moongirl
    Quote from medic2ernurse2b
    If nursing is what you really want, then you may want to consider enrolling in Excelsior College. There is a lot of info in the distance learning forum. You may be eligible to enroll if you have completed at least 50% of traditional nursing school. But let me warn you right away that it is not for everybody. You have to be VERY motivated and disciplined, you cannot be a procrastinator, and you need to be able to learn the material independently. You can study on your own time and schedule your exams at Pearson Testing Centers when you feel you are ready, but you also have to take a 3-day practical exam at the end which costs $1800 and has about a 60-70% pass rate. If you want more info go to www.excelsior.edu.

    is Excelsior accredited? many many employers will not hire you unless you are a graduate of a program that is
  10. by   caliotter3
    Excelsior is accredited. The problem with Excelsior is that several states are not accepting it anymore or are placing stipulations on Excelsior graduates. The reasoning behind these changes in policy are in the minds of the people sitting on the boards that are making these decisions. If you go to their website you can read about the recent awards that their nursing program has received, I believe, from the NLN.
  11. by   ROBERTF7
    DEAR VRNH,
    I AGREE WITH MEDIC2ERNURSE 2B.

    I GRADUATED FROM EXCELSIOR COLLEGE IN SEPTEMBER AND PASSED MY NJ BOARDS IN LATE DECEMBER. I AM COMPLETING MY ORIENTATION THIS WEEK AT A MAJOR NJ HOSPITAL WITH MAGNET STATUS. TRADITIONAL NURSING SCHOOL IS GREAT ,BUT SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES LEAD ME TO EXCELSIOR. I WORKED CONSTRUCTION DURING THE DAY TO EARN A PAYCHECK AND STUDIED AT NIGHT. IT TOOK ME TWO AND HALF YEARS.

    MEDIC IS RIGHT, IT IS NOT FOR EVERYONE. IT TAKES ALOT OF SELF DISCIPLINE. BUT IT ALLOWS YOU TO LEARN AT YOUR OWN PACE AND DOES NOT REQUIRE YOU TO RELOCATE.

    I ALSO WANT TO TELL YOU THAT AS I HAVE GONE THROUGH ORIENTATION AND HAVE SPOKEN TO THE OTHER NEWGRAD HIRES IN THE CLASS FROM TRADITIONAL SCHOOLS, THAT I FEEL EQUALLY PREPARED AS A RESULT OF EXCELSIOR. SO CHECK YOUR STATE BOARD REGULATIONS AND CALL THE SCHOOL. MAYBE THEY CAN EVEN PUT YOU IN CONTACT WITH SOME RECENT GRADUATES FROM YOUR STATE TO GET THEIR IMPRESSIONS. YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE.

    GOOD LUCK[GOOGLE][/GOOGLE]
  12. by   DoubleblessedRN
    Quote from moongirl
    is Excelsior accredited? many many employers will not hire you unless you are a graduate of a program that is
    Yes, Excelsior is NLN accredited, but several states do not recognize it. I know that CA, IL, and MD do not, and I believe FL, WA, CO, and OK have restrictions. (There may be others; these are the ones I know of off the top of my head.)
  13. by   HM2VikingRN
    I would be truthful. You are much more likely to get a second chance if you are honest.

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