Disciplinary Action Poll

  1. Have you ever felt that you or a coworker had an unfair disciplinary action taken against you/them?
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  2. Poll: Have you ever felt that you or a fellow coworker had an unfair disciplinary action ag

    • Yes, definitely.

      72.09% 31
    • No.

      18.60% 8
    • I'm not sure, but I suspect.

      9.30% 4
    • I'm afraid to respond honestly.

      0% 0
    43 Votes
  3. 9 Comments

  4. by   UM Review RN
    Anyone care to discuss?

    To me, a manager has to be very well-balanced and fair. I'm sure it's a difficult job to do, but I've also seen some very passive-aggressive behavior.

    I've seen people fired who absolutely had no reason to be fired, and others promoted and their errors overlooked who also had no business doing so.

    An unfair manager can cause extreme levels of discord, stress, and fear into the workplace.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It's not really the manager that i take issue with, but the people that report to her.

    They are supposedly the people in charge and report to her, yet they're buddy-buddy with a few of the regular employees, so when someone's on probabtion or such, the people in charge tell their friends, then tell them not to say anything, yet here i found out anyway, without asking and without being in their little gossip circle.

    Another thing. In one of our morning meetings, they can announce that so-and-so "is no longer working at our facility" yet they can't discuss why because it's private (it's safe to assume the person was fired). Ok, well if the reason is private, then why are y'all announcing that the person isn't here? What do we gain or what does the person leaving gain, by having their current status announced to a room of 100?

    The last 2 people that were "no longer at our facility", they said they were going to management about the gossipy supervisors. And a week after saying that, they were out of a job. Which pretty much set an example of what happens when you try to make a difference.
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    It's not really the manager that i take issue with, but the people that report to her.

    They are supposedly the people in charge and report to her, yet they're buddy-buddy with a few of the regular employees, so when someone's on probabtion or such, the people in charge tell their friends, then tell them not to say anything, yet here i found out anyway, without asking and without being in their little gossip circle.

    Another thing. In one of our morning meetings, they can announce that so-and-so "is no longer working at our facility" yet they can't discuss why because it's private (it's safe to assume the person was fired). Ok, well if the reason is private, then why are y'all announcing that the person isn't here? What do we gain or what does the person leaving gain, by having their current status announced to a room of 100?

    The last 2 people that were "no longer at our facility", they said they were going to management about the gossipy supervisors. And a week after saying that, they were out of a job. Which pretty much set an example of what happens when you try to make a difference.
    Exactly, Marie. A complaint is a weapon with a double edge. There's a lot of "goin' along to get along" in this job.


    I've seen some excellent nurses driven from the bedside precisely because of this problem. They either did complain and were then retaliated against, or they knew better than to complain out loud, and simply left.

    I guess what bothers me is that in every way, some of these nurses were excellent role models, and I see every day that the patient care reflects the loss of their expertise.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    That's just it, if i complain, i have to go back to work there when i'm done in the manager's office.

    I figure when my contract is up, i might stay another year, which will put me at 5 years exp., then i'll be hunting for another job. My exit interview ought to be a picnic.
  8. by   UM Review RN
    Our HR people c/o people not asking for exit interviews. I figure it's because:
    (a) it's a little like locking the barn door after the horse got out,
    and (b) the exiting employee feels a tad paranoid and worries that the next employer will (how? by osmosis? or by the very fact that leaving a workplace indicates some sort of dissatisfaction?) know that they had issues with the former place.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think it's ridiculous that people would have to ASK for an exit interview. You'd think HR would want to know why their employees are leaving.
  10. by   jaimemds
    Where I used to work, the nurse who was orienting me had put in her two weeks notice and went for exit interview. She was honest about why she was leaving and was told not to come back or finish her two-weeks.
  11. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    When I was a CNA, I got written up and the writeup sounded horrible. It said that I left a alzheimers patient completely naked and uncovered in four-point restraints with his bed way up in the air. Makes me sound horrible, right?

    However, THIS is the story behind it. The man was combative, and so we were supposed to only untie one wrist at a time to bathe him. I went in there with another CNA and we raised his bed high for our own comfort. I untied the wrist closest to me and began bathing him. Well, without discussing it with me, the other CNA decided to untie the other wrist. The next thing I know, the man has reached over with the hand she untied and grabbed a fistful of skin right above my right breast. He grabs ahold and pulls it toward him with all his might, ripping the skin away from my ribs. I was screaming, two other LPNs ran in, and they were able to get him to turn loose of me but the damage was done. I was sobbing and it felt like my chest was on fire, I gasped that I needed to get some ice and ran doubled over out of the room. I put ice on my chest for twenty minutes, and ended up with a basketball sized bruise starting below my neck and covering my right breast. It was excrutiating. Well, apparently both nurses and the other CNA had just retied his wrists and left the room. They did not finish the bath, dress him, lower the bed, or even cover him up. I know that technically he was assigned to me, but he had badly injured me and I was unable to stay in the room. The bruise lasted for weeks, he had actually pulled the flesh away from my ribcage. Before I walked out of the lounge (where I was holding the icepack to my chest) my charge nurse came in furious, screaming at me that how dare I leave that poor man in that condition. I tried to explain that there were three people in that room when I left, and they left him that way, not me- but she didn't care. All I could do was write an explanation and attach it to the writeup. I signed my explanation, but refused to sign the writeup itself.
  12. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from LoriAlabamaRN
    When I was a CNA, I got written up and the writeup sounded horrible. It said that I left a alzheimers patient completely naked and uncovered in four-point restraints with his bed way up in the air. Makes me sound horrible, right?

    However, THIS is the story behind it. The man was combative, and so we were supposed to only untie one wrist at a time to bathe him. I went in there with another CNA and we raised his bed high for our own comfort. I untied the wrist closest to me and began bathing him. Well, without discussing it with me, the other CNA decided to untie the other wrist. The next thing I know, the man has reached over with the hand she untied and grabbed a fistful of skin right above my right breast. He grabs ahold and pulls it toward him with all his might, ripping the skin away from my ribs. I was screaming, two other LPNs ran in, and they were able to get him to turn loose of me but the damage was done. I was sobbing and it felt like my chest was on fire, I gasped that I needed to get some ice and ran doubled over out of the room. I put ice on my chest for twenty minutes, and ended up with a basketball sized bruise starting below my neck and covering my right breast. It was excrutiating. Well, apparently both nurses and the other CNA had just retied his wrists and left the room. They did not finish the bath, dress him, lower the bed, or even cover him up. I know that technically he was assigned to me, but he had badly injured me and I was unable to stay in the room. The bruise lasted for weeks, he had actually pulled the flesh away from my ribcage. Before I walked out of the lounge (where I was holding the icepack to my chest) my charge nurse came in furious, screaming at me that how dare I leave that poor man in that condition. I tried to explain that there were three people in that room when I left, and they left him that way, not me- but she didn't care. All I could do was write an explanation and attach it to the writeup. I signed my explanation, but refused to sign the writeup itself.

    That's horrible! I'm so sorry you went through that.
    I've seen this happen too. It sounds like the write-up was done to keep you from complaining about your injuries.

    This way, if you did have to go to workman's comp or whatever, the write-up would serve as "proof" that you weren't doing your job properly and therefore, caused your own injury.

    To those that uphold that type of "discipline" : :trout: :angryfire :wakeneo:

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