Difference between RN and LPN responsibilities in the hospital setting? Difference between RN and LPN responsibilities in the hospital setting? | allnurses

Difference between RN and LPN responsibilities in the hospital setting?

  1. 0 Can you please tell me what the difference is between LPN and RN responsibilities in the hospital? In other words, what can't an LPN do that an RN can do? I'm in an RN program and have met some very impressive LPNs in the hospital and it seems no difference, but I don' t know legally what the difference is. Thanks!
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. Visit  UM Review RN profile page
    #1 1
    Basically, the LPN works under the direction of the RN, and the LPN cannot do things like admission assessments or push IV drugs without further training.

    On the upper right corner of this screen, you'll see a "Links" section that has Boards of Nursing listed for each state. It also might help to look up the Nurse Practice Act for your state and read it.
  4. Visit  txspadequeenRN profile page
    #2 1
    Here we go again!!!! :deadhorse
  5. Visit  z's playa profile page
    #3 0
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    Here we go again!!!! :deadhorse



    Z
  6. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #4 2
    The difference is about $200.00/week and that's it. Seriously, LPNs in my unit work side by side with the RNs on the floor doing exactly the same thing for much less money. Techanically, they don't do admission assessments and plan of care. They are not charge nurses. That's it.

    I can understand why as a new nurse you would ask. Different hospitals in different parts of the country utilize them differently. Right now our hospital is not hiring LPNs, but we have lots of them that have been there a while.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 30, '05
  7. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    #5 0
  8. Visit  nursemike profile page
    #6 0
    Quote from RebeccaOne
    Can you please tell me what the difference is between LPN and RN responsibilities in the hospital? In other words, what can't an LPN do that an RN can do? I'm in an RN program and have met some very impressive LPNs in the hospital and it seems no difference, but I don' t know legally what the difference is. Thanks!
    Where I did clinicals, LPNs were "teamed" with RNs and CNAs. Each team shared a patient assignment, and each member had specific roles. Where I work, LPNs have their own assignments and an RN is assigned to cover the few things the LPN isn't allowed to do. I haven't really discussed it, but I suppose the rationale is that the LPN is under the delegation of the Charge Nurse.
    Both approaches appear to have pros and cons, but one net result is that positions for LPNs are scarce where I work, but more plentiful where I did clinicals.
  9. Visit  SitcomNurse profile page
    #7 0
    Quote from RebeccaOne
    Can you please tell me what the difference is between LPN and RN responsibilities in the hospital? In other words, what can't an LPN do that an RN can do? I'm in an RN program and have met some very impressive LPNs in the hospital and it seems no difference, but I don' t know legally what the difference is. Thanks!
    The difference in RN and LPN is attitude. Both sets of Nurses have them, but one gets paid to talk to the interdiciplinary team about it, and the other gets paid to talk to the RN.
    Another difference? the years it takes to get a BSN. For the wholistic/fully rounded nurse, educated in many aspects, not just nursing and its tasks.
    Another difference? The LPN's who see fit to just do a med pass, and not assist in any other patient care measure. Forget about verbal orders, forget about assisting CNA's, forget about charting forget about monitoring for side effects of meds.
    I have had the great fortune to know these things only by other nurses complaints. I have always worked with nurses who were going to school for their RN. The are actively interested, and need to be certified inside the building for different items, like IV's and Foley procedures, sterile procedures,
    and assessments. Who? How? When? Why?

    The facility I work in holds restraints on LPN's. One supervisor called the LPN's Medication People. HELLO?? Well ya know what? Most of the LPN's in my building became just that on that day. They stopped all the 'extras'.

    Legally the difference is...a person who is suing will always sue from the highest licence to the lowest, in financially appropriate order. As an RN, you are overseeing the ongoings of the unit, or your ward, or your sector..
    And any LPN's in it are ultimately your responsibility. Hopefully they want to know what they are doing. Who is above you? They are the ones that usually make more money, and have more say in care management.

    When perceptions change, maybe LPN's will get the respect they deserve as an active, valued member of the heath care team. Until then, I hope I keep getting active interested students as part of my team.
    SitcomNurse RN, BSN
    Every once in a while God turns on the SitcomNurse channel for sh*ts and giggles.
  10. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #8 3
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    Here we go again!!!! :deadhorse


    (I didn't want to think so, but reading the post above, I'm a bit wary. )
  11. Visit  z's playa profile page
    #9 0
    I can see what you mean Tweety but regarding this poster...they never addressed the topic before.

    Let's see how many want to re-address. :chuckle

    Z
  12. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    #10 4
    See a topic for the millionionth time, nothing new to add, then why not just pass on the thread in question in stead of rolling the eyes.

    It's the same attitude that students and new employees are seeing everywhere that is so troblesome: lack of desire to share one's knowlege and see questions as burdensome.

    Nursing is about TEACHING and EDUCATION of patients and peers, lest we forget that. At some time it will be you moving to a new usnit, new facility and asking questions for the thousandth time.

    Knowledge = power. Use it and share it wisely.
  13. Visit  Tweety profile page
    #11 1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    See a topic for the millionionth time, nothing new to add, then why not just pass on the thread in question in stead of rolling the eyes.

    It's the same attitude that students and new employees are seeing everywhere that is so troblesome: lack of desire to share one's knowlege and see questions as burdensome.

    Nursing is about TEACHING and EDUCATION of patients and peers, lest we forget that. At some time it will be you moving to a new usnit, new facility and asking questions for the thousandth time.

    Knowledge = power. Use it and share it wisely.
    Personally I did share an honest answer.

    See a post for the millionth time, sometimes you get a little wary of the direction that you know it's has the potential to head for. (And a post did sound a bit inflammatory towards the LPNs). Thus the rolling of the eyes. Of course it's not fair to the original poster, to whom I humbly apologize.

    But you know, I'm not known for passing a thread by without putting my two cents. I definately should follow your advice Karen.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 30, '05
  14. Visit  mommatrauma profile page
    #12 0
    It is state and institution dependant...in my institution LPNs can not can not do IV push, and can not hang IVF w/Potassium...They are allowed to do a full assessment, write a chart, give any po and injectable meds...(sq and im) start iv's (after they take an IV course). We utilize our LPNs in our quick care, and they are a vital addition to keep our quick care working efficiently!!

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