Difference between ADN and BSN

  1. 0
    I know this probably have been asked already, but I was just curious at the pay difference between a nurses with a ADN and BSN. How does the degree relate to what kind of work you do at your workplace?
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  5. 0
    At our place there is no difference in salary or job description. Some places require a BSN to have an admin job, but not all do.
  6. 0
    In most places, an RN is an RN. The time that it took to get it doesn't make any difference. You may see $0.25 more per hour, up to $1 in some parts of the country, but that is it. You do need a Bachelors, at least of some type, for most management positions. But as far as the bedside RN, essentially no difference.
  7. 0
    Please, feel free to do a search on the site. This subject is very heatedly and hotly debated often. Good luck!
  8. 0
    So then why does schools offer RN to BSN programs? Is it for people who want to get into administration or want to get a Master or PhD?
  9. 0
    Quote from hotshot12345
    So then why does schools offer RN to BSN programs? Is it for people who want to get into administration or want to get a Master or PhD?
    yes. or people that just want a BS for whatever reason.
  10. 0
    Quote from hotshot12345
    So then why does schools offer RN to BSN programs? Is it for people who want to get into administration or want to get a Master or PhD?
    BSN programs offer community health/public health and management, and teach the care of more complex patients. Comparing programs, particularly from the same university, will show you the difference quite clearly.
  11. 0
    As others have said ... there is usually no difference or very little difference in the salaries right out of school. Also, there is usually no or little salary difference as long as the nurse stays in a staff nurse role.

    However ... nurses with BSN's and higher degrees have more career paths available to them, and they are not just management positions. Some community health jobs require a BSN or higher... jobs in infection control, patient education ... discharge planners ... staff education ... etc. often require a BSN or are at least "BSN preferred." Such jobs involve more indepedence and the need to evaluate the literature, evaluate programs, etc. and many people that the BSN better prepares nurses for those types of roles. Such jobs sometimes involve higher pay and/or better working conditions and can be quite competitive to get. So having that BSN plus good relevant clinical experience can be a key factor in who is selected.

    llg
  12. 0
    Quote from zenman
    BSN programs offer community health/public health and management, and teach the care of more complex patients. Comparing programs, particularly from the same university, will show you the difference quite clearly.
    Ummm...so does my ADN program. I just finished my Critcial Care rotation (complex health problems) and I am now doing my leadership/management classes and community health service learning projects.
  13. 0
    Basically the difference is a 4 year collge degree and a 2 year associates.. The bachelor degree, on average, will give you greater financial rewards and career flexibility then the 2 year associates degree over your working career.


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