Didn't pass one clinical rotation, don't know why

  1. I just finished almost the whole nursing program and was failed in one of my clinicals. I don't really know why and I don't know what to do. My grades have been very good, I have lots of past experience as a CNA, an d I have even passed meds error free for many years. I made no drastic mistakes in clinical, but do get pretty nervous when being watched. I was told that I am disorganized even though I do not feel that I am and past employers have always complimented me on organization. I was told I don't know the nursing process, but my grades are 3.5 and my NLN's on this portion were 98 percentile and my class averaged 58 percentile. I am 57 years old and waiting another year to repeat my clinical is major at this age. I feel I am being discrimimnated against and don't know what to do. Can anyone help me? Is there another way to pass clinical or take the NCLEX? Thanks
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   jemb
    Can you ask the instructor of that clinical what it was that caused you to fail? Did you get any sort of a written report or recommendation?
  4. by   IMustBeCrazy
    I'm pretty sure that your school is required by your state Board of Nursing to have written clinical goals that you and your classmates must meet. Otherwise, it would be an entirely subjective endeavor. I would (nicely) insist to your nurse preceptor that I would like to see the list of clinical goals and written documentation on where and when I fell short.

    If you don't get satisfaction from that preceptor, again politely but firmly insist on talking to the Nursing Department chair at your school, you certainly have the right to understand in which areas you were deficient. If they are unable to produce such documentation then I would call foul. Good luck!
  5. by   nursbee04
    I thought they had to counsel you before they fail you, and if they fail you they have to explain why. Do they not tell you whether you pass/fail face to face? I'm pretty sure in order to be an accredited school they must go over the clinical expectations/checklist with you and explain what you did/didn't meet. That's how it was explained to my class when I was in nsg school.
    I only knew of one girl who failed clinicals, and she was counseled twice (she lacked very basic fundamentals and was extremely insecure, to the point that it hindered her performance and ability to interact with patients.)

    I would talk to your school's nsg dep. I really don't think they can fail you without telling you why. Hugs and good luck...
  6. by   tonicareer
    I would not be surprised if your age is the reason they are treating you this way. Age discrimination is a very real problem and very difficult to prove.
  7. by   zenman
    Oh, that's BS! You're not old. Something's not quite right with this picture...you should know why you did not pass.
  8. by   AcosmicRN
    I sympathize with anyone who does that well in nursing school and then doesn't pass, but this sounds a bit like a divorce-story. You know, the kind where you only hear the one side and the one telling the story is always a saint who suffered tremendously at the hands of the other.

    When I was in school, it was a major effort to fail someone in clinicals. If they did, it was for a very specific reason. If you don't want to share that with us, I can understand, but it's hard to agree you were hard done by when, if I was there, I might have agreed with the decision, you know? All we are left with is that you are 57, and I feel like I'm being corralled into accepting you were failed because of an age conspiracy.

    Can you be any more specific on the reasons they failed you in clinical? You sound like you were a great student.

    Acosmic
    Last edit by AcosmicRN on Jun 21, '04 : Reason: spelling
  9. by   CHATSDALE
    I know that in lpn school they "weeded" people for very poor reasons in clinical that they could not on a grade basis.....if you feel that you performed ad
  10. by   llg
    Like everyone else, I suggest that you meet with the instructor and ask for specific examples of poor performance on your part. You need to understand exactly why you failed the course -- and the instructor should be willing and able to provide that. You also need to be open-minded in your reception of that information. Don't assume that you are the victim of age discrimination just because you are not happy with your situation.

    I the instructor is not able to provide that information, then you should meet (politely and professionally, of course) with the proper authorities of your school. Perhaps your academic advisor is the place to start, but depending on your school, it might also be the course coordinator, the nursing department chairman, dean, etc.

    Also, you probably want to investigate your school's policy on appealing grades. Many schools have a specific procedure spelled out as to how you go about appealing a grade you disagree. Many years ago, I sat on such a committee. Whenever a student failed a class and appealed the grade, we always listened to their side of the story (as well as the faculty member's) and helped them set up some time of "re-evaluation plan" that gave the student a chance to demonstrate her mastery of the course content without having to re-take the entire course. We didn't change any grades, but we helped the involved parties find a neutral judge to re-evaluate the student's performance.

    When you speak with your school's administration about your concern's, you might consider asking for such a re-evaluation. Rather than accusing them (or the faculty member) of the crime of discrimination, you might get further by requesting a review of your performance and abilities by an objective, outside person -- another faculty member who you trust. The school is more likely to agree to this than it is to simply change your grade based on your word alone.

    llg
  11. by   moonlite48
    Quote from AcosmicRN
    I sympathize with anyone who does that well in nursing school and then doesn't pass, but this sounds a bit like a divorce-story. You know, the kind where you only hear the one side and the one telling the story is always a saint who suffered tremendously at the hands of the other.

    When I was in school, it was a major effort to fail someone in clinicals. If they did, it was for a very specific reason. If you don't want to share that with us, I can understand, but it's hard to agree you were hard done by when, if I was there, I might have agreed with the decision, you know? All we are left with is that you are 57, and I feel like I'm being corralled into accepting you were failed because of an age conspiracy.

    Can you be any more specific on the reasons they failed you in clinical? You sound like you were a great student.

    Acosmic
    I guess I was too upset when I wrote my post. My title was misleading and I didn't explain a couple things. Clinical is pass/fail and my grades don't matter. I took it to the director and she said the teacher has been with them many years and they trust her judgment. I put the reasons I was given in person, and in writing in my letter, but I see I didn't fully explain. I was told that I am disorganized and that she could never see me traking care of six patients. I was told that I don't know the nursing process,and that she doesn't have confidence that I will be able to pass meds competently. I left an air bubble when I set up an injection twice. I get extremely nervous when being watched. When I prepare an injection on my own and then have it checked I have been fine. When I do a sterile procedure I get very nervous when preparing for it especially when family and other students are allowed in the patients room watching. I go through a lot of gloves because when I am nervous I have six thumbs on each hand. I have never ruined a whole kit though. When it gets down to the actual procedure I do OK because my mind is then on the patient instead of my "nerves". My patients seem to like me and my instructor had no complaint in that area. So what it boils down to is that yes I do know why, because I was told those reasons, but I don't know why because they don't seem valid. I have wanted to be a nurse since I was 15 years old. I have spent all these years reading medical articles on my own. My brother always jokingly called me "Dr. Kildare" (for those of you old enogh to know who he was!) This is really breaking my heart. I have been disabled and unable to work for 14 years. I had to work at a nursing home full time for a year to prove to my Dr. that I could do it before he would sign the necessary papers for me to go to nursing school. I have now been working for two years and have made it through to the end of nursing school.
  12. by   CHATSDALE
    got a puter problem b/4 i finished first reply....moonlite you got some good advise in the other posts about talking to and getting in writing any thing which might have caused your clinical problems...another option is that you may be able to sit for lpn licensure and the experience you will gain in a working situation will prepare you for next clinical when you are eligible...you have put too much time and effort into this to let it go to waste good luck
  13. by   myrenie
    Hello,
    I wanted to let you know that I failed to pass my clinical rotation as well d/t being unable to achieve math at the "mastery" level. We were expected to get perfect on 1 of 4 calculation quizes that were expected to be written in the clinical setting. (a busy medication room). A week before my semester was over my boyfriend dumped me this increased the stress of school and achieving mastery. As well, I had care plans and portfolios due which I put my heart and soul into, and I did really well on. OH well. I am planning on returning to school in the fall to re-do that rotation and obtain math at the mastery level. I was in contact with the dean regarding this situation, unfortunatly she was unhelpful inregards to letting me have another opportunity to write the quiz, and was empathetic in regards to the environment that students were given to write these quizes. I explained to her that if obtaining mastery was the key to passing the rotation, the instructors should have provided an ideal place for writing the math quizes. She told me that this may change for future nursing student, but that myself and the others would have to re-do the rotation. (sOL) I have worked as a nurses aid the last 5 years and am competant with medication administration, but perfect on the quiz is essential.
    Dont let this change your mind of becoming a nurse, nursing school can be challenging as a mature student, if I were you I'd continue and finish.
    Good Luck!!
  14. by   oneLoneNurse
    I failed the first RN Med Surg Rn rotation too. I was an older student. The Dean told me now its time to take a piece of the humble pie. I did. I was happy I did.

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