Decline a shift equals termination? - page 2

by kparry

3,478 Views | 20 Comments

Seeking work and came across something odd. Preceeding the following paragraph is a grid 24 rows long by 7 columns wide with the instruction to put an x in each box for hours you are commited to work going forward. Hours... Read More


  1. 1
    I'm not sure if I understand ... Is this for something PRN or on-call or regular full-time/part-time?

    With summer coming up, I know staffing coordinators are anxious to plump up their summer vacation schedules. But I also know that signer-uppers freq cancel on short notice when the weather will be esp nice (or nasty) or if there's a special ballgame to be played or impromptu social event comes up, etc. And the mentality/excuse of the signer-upper is, 'Oh, well, I was just signing up as extra'. So I do understand the frustration of management.

    Sounds like this employer has been burnt before and is taking a NO-NONSENSE approach to cancellations for the summer.

    But I do agree with all the other posters. Something just doesn't sound right. I would be asking more questions before I signed anything!
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  2. 3
    More information is needed before I could make a judgment. Is this a sheet on which people are signing up to work specific shifts on specific days? If that's the case ... and you sign up for a particular shift ... then of course, yes, you are expected to work the shift you committed to. You are committed to work the shift you signed up for. That's a normal expectation in most work environments. You can't sign up for a shift and then change your mind at the last minute and leave everyone in the lurch.

    Or is there something else going on here that I am missing?
  3. 2
    They're setting you up. You work and when you either get fed up, make any plans, get the sniffles, or a sick child... BOOM! Fired with no job and having to tell future employers why you were fired.

    Run like crazy as fast as you can in the opposite direction!!
    Esme12 and NurseDirtyBird like this.
  4. 2
    I'd check the boxes for Monday from 7a to 3p only. They can ask you for any additional time they want, but you are only obligated for 8 hours a week. Surely you can tolerate an 8 hour commitment per week (while you look for a real job).
    RNitis and Altra like this.
  5. 2
    I am not understanding this either. Is this an attempt at "self scheduling" so that perhaps nurses will call off less? Or is this for some mandatory call? Or PRN....

    If this is a "self scheduling" thing, then I would ask a few more questions. For instance, most self scheduling is done by seniority. Then some places have the most senior then goes to the bottom and the next most senior gets first choice--and so on per schedule. Travellers and PRN's are then scheduled in where there are holes. There are also nurses who because of their seniority have set shifts.

    In any event, if you are a PRN and they are asking your availibility, then I would say at least you are given a choice. Most PRN agreements have a min. amount of shifts that one has to work. If this is for overtime and/or extra shifts, then unless you want some overtime, I wouldn't want to commit. If it is for "on call" shifts, again, unless you want to be on call, I wouldn't sign up.

    I was also under the impression that in some states, there is no more "mandatory overtime". If that is what their game is, it is an attempt to not hire more nurses???? Are you a Union hospital?

    It seems like it could be a policy issue, as if there's a policy in place (or a Union Contract) that states your facility has progressive discipline, this is a contraindication of this policy. On the flip side, a right to work state can do whatever they would like to.

    This needs to be discussed with your nurse manager. Not sure what the goal of this would be. Usually nurses have to agree to self schedule. The rest (PRN, call, overtime) is a choice if you want the hours or not and when. Sounds like a glaring response to people who sign up for extra shifts, call, or PRN's stating availability, then stating they "didn't realize, can't do it, sorry" responses.
    amoLucia and llg like this.
  6. 0
    As a complete aside, 2 weeks notice is pretty good. Most self scheduling requires you to find your own switch or work the shift, most PRN's schedule you and too bad if you can work it or not...
  7. 2
    I don't think its as big of a deal as others think. Everyone's getting freaked out over the term "voluntary termination". Basically what's its saying is that they want your availability. They'll make the schedule. If something comes up, you got to give them 2 weeks notice. If you don't bother to come in, its considered that you quit. That's like any other industry- if you don't show up when your supposed to be there its assumed you quite (some organizations do have a policy of how many shifts you can not show up for before they considered you quit).

    Not a big deal. And they being nice by finding coverage for you if you can't work. Most places make you find your own coverage.
    NRSKarenRN and llg like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from BacktoBasics
    I don't think its as big of a deal as others think. Everyone's getting freaked out over the term "voluntary termination". Basically what's its saying is that they want your availability. They'll make the schedule. If something comes up, you got to give them 2 weeks notice. If you don't bother to come in, its considered that you quit. That's like any other industry- if you don't show up when your supposed to be there its assumed you quite (some organizations do have a policy of how many shifts you can not show up for before they considered you quit).

    Not a big deal. And they being nice by finding coverage for you if you can't work. Most places make you find your own coverage.
    My concern is if there's any guarantee they'll get the schedule to you within two weeks, so you're able to give notice. And how can you give 2 weeks notice that you can't make your shift when you get sick?

    To the OP: I would ask a lot of questions about this and get a written copy of this policy before signing anything.
    I work PRN and have never seen anything like this. I'm required to work a certain amount of 8 hour shifts per month, but I sign up to fill in holes in the schedule month by month. I've never been married to a certain availability by my job.
  9. 0
    Unionize for your lives!
  10. 0
    It appears your place is adopting the retail way of doing things... in retail like staples,walmart, sams, etc. they ask you for your availabilty then in the same breath ask you if you can be "flexible". god forbid you are in school and not into making a carreer of being a sales associate or cashier with said company.


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