Death bed visions - page 9

Hello everybody. I can not think of a better place to ask this questions other than a forum full of what I believe to be Gods angels in human form. In your experience taking care of the injured... Read More

  1. by   *LadyJane*
    Just bumping a great thread... thanks to the OP for starting this...

    Jane
  2. by   HeavensNurse
    GoLytely,

    I'm sorry to disagree, but you are out of touch, BIGTIME. I have been a hospice nurse for 15+ years and no matter what you think, do not EVER underestimate what a patient is going through at the time they are going to pass onto the other side. If you are a good nurse you will hold your disbelief to yourself, and keep your mind open. You might find a whole differnent side of life, and death if you do. I will hope for your sake you do. Good luck. And may a very special patient touch you in a way you will not be able to justify in your head. AMEN:redpinkhe
  3. by   redding-er-rn
    Thank you Heavens Nurse! As a fellow hospice nurse, I could visualize everything described by Winterfresh. We see it almost daily in our line of work and it becomes the "norm" for us to see it. I truely believe that often as hospice nurses we become somewhat of a "bridge" for our patients who are getting ready to enter the next phase of their life. I can't help but think how wonderful it is that even in death our loved ones (past and/or present) are with us and help guide us in our journey.
    I just had a patient who asked me why everytime she opened her eyes all the people went away? I could only think to tell her that they were there to show her the way and it was OK to go with them. She closed her eyes again and died a few hours later with her children there at her bedside. They said she was talking to their father who had passed away about a year earlier right before she took her last breath. They said that even in her death they were very comforted by the fact that they knew that Mom was with Dad and that they would see them again....
  4. by   jstbreathe
    Had a pancreatic cancer pt once, young guy (40). He was end stage. Evidently he was a BIG racist and antichrist!! With anti (whatever) tattoo's all over his body. Anyway...he would NOT go to sleep. He was in so much pain, and so exhausted, but refused to go to sleep. When his brother asked why he wouldn't sleep. He pointed to the chair and said "the devil was sitting there waiting on me". He requested a priest, Not sure if priest made it before he passed though. I hope so! Another pt (short story) unresponsive, CBG was 14 (yes 14!!) D50 pushed, pt slowly wakes. She said she was 'swimming with the whales" all she could hear was me yelling at her to wake up! She was nice, but mad. She was having a good time swimming. She then told me she can't swim!!
  5. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from HeavensNurse
    GoLytely,

    I'm sorry to disagree, but you are out of touch, BIGTIME. I have been a hospice nurse for 15+ years and no matter what you think, do not EVER underestimate what a patient is going through at the time they are going to pass onto the other side. If you are a good nurse you will hold your disbelief to yourself, and keep your mind open. You might find a whole differnent side of life, and death if you do. I will hope for your sake you do. Good luck. And may a very special patient touch you in a way you will not be able to justify in your head. AMEN:redpinkhe
    Well, wanting something to be true and getting annoyed when someone challenges it doesn't make it any more true. I've seen death and dying in spades during my time as a LTC and private duty nurse. I could tell about the time I sat on the bed of a woman who just died and it got my bad tooth giving me a fit until I got off the bed, and I played the game for quite awhile just because it was amusing. I'd sit on the bed, my tooth would start hurting so bad I couldn't stand it. So, I'd get up and all of the sudden the ache would go away.

    I took care of my father-in-law until he died (from a brain hemorrhage from a fall.) A couple of hours before he went out he starting yelling, "Mommy! Georgie!" (George was his brother.) It could have been a touching moment, except he had suffered from dementia and hallucinations for years before that, too.

    It's rather arrogant to assume I enjoy telling dying people my beliefs. For that matter, I've been at the deathbed of atheists and they do not all have those deathbed conversions some people like to talk about. Carl Sagan and Frank Zappa, for instance. They were atheists until they died, as confirmed by those present at their deaths.

    I was present at the death of one of the most religious women I've ever met. She just faded away and got weaker and weaker. She never pointed to anyone we couldn't see or reached to "the light" or anything else.

    I think you're the one out of touch. If a nurse truly respects everyone's beliefs (like *good* nurses should) then it wouldn't offend them when someone holds a belief different from theirs. I bite my tongue and smile at all the church people when I really want to gag when they come around the unit.

    In the end, it's not important. I don't feel the need to believe. I think when you're dead you're going to be aware of everything you were aware of before you were born, and my viewpoint is just as right as yours.

    Only thing is I won't be able to tell anyone I told you so.
  6. by   hypocaffeinemia
    Precisely, GoLytely!
  7. by   SDS_RN
    I think that everyone is free to believe what they want. I don't try to force my beliefs on others and I don't appreciate it when others try to force theirs on me. People believe what they want and they are free to change those beliefs if they choose. We are there to help our patients pass on whether that is into the afterlife or if its into nothing---we need to be respectful to them and their families and provide them with comfort and compassion in their present situation.
  8. by   seasonednurse78
    I remember being at the bedside of one of my patients as she was passing and she had a faraway but very peaceful and happy look on her face and she said, "Oh, how beautiful!" She then told me she loved me as well as her daughter who was also at her bedside. She passed soon after that. I will never forget that experience. :heartbeat
  9. by   HeavensNurse
    GoLytely,

    Everyone, is entitled to their opion. I simply encourage you to keep your mind open. Some very good nurses have seen things they cannot explain, unlike you who seem to have an answer or explanation for everything. I have never EVER tried to SAVE anyone during their transition. I except my patient where they are during their dying process. I pray with them if they ask. Most times I am simply with them, so they are not alone. I never share my beliefs with anyone, nor have I shared them on this blog. I just want people to know the beauty of the dying process and how lucky I have been to have witnessed thousands of them, and not a one was "wicked" or "evil". Some were very uneventful, infact most. The ones that touched me, and made me believe in something beyond "cheimcals" and human explanation are the ones I hope to have the answer to on the day I cross over. Maybe (and again just THINK about it) what we BELIEVE is what we get. So if we believe in NOTHING, that's what's waiting for us (you?) Again, just food for thought. I am not angry. Just interested. Studying humans is an art. And my opinion is worth what you paid for it. HA! Enjoy everyday to the fullest. You never know when it may be your last. Live life with no regrets. That is what death and dying has taught me. Have a lovely day! And take good care of your patients, they need you. :heartbeat
  10. by   emsboss
    Nice to see this post "resurrected". All the words on this post do not change the fact that dying is part of living, just happens to be the last physical part. Everyone has an opinion about what happens next, that is the joy of living in this country, we are allowed to have an opinion. If you don't like your neighbors, suck it up and move on. I FIRMLY believe there is an "afterlife" and what we do here on this life determines where we go. What I also believe is, when we die, it is the ONE thing that we cannot rely on someone else, it must be done ALONE!!!!!!!!! As an R.N., and before this a Paramedic, I have seen way to much stuff to not believe. If you don't want to believe, that is up to you, but... "As for me and my house"... We believe.
  11. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from HeavensNurse
    GoLytely,

    Everyone, is entitled to their opion. I simply encourage you to keep your mind open. Some very good nurses have seen things they cannot explain, unlike you who seem to have an answer or explanation for everything.... :heartbeat
    Oh no, this isn't a hostile statement at all...

    If more people would live by Occam's Razor the world would be a much better place, I'll just say that.
  12. by   moosemadness
    Ok you two (golyte and heavens nurse), play nice in the sand box. I actually enjoy reading peoples stories of what they have seen regarding a person dying, but you two need to drop it.
  13. by   hypocaffeinemia
    This was the OP:
    Quote from legend0710
    In your experience taking care of the injured and specificaly the dying, what are your thoughts and experiences regarding those ready to pass being able to see something just prior?
    Golytely's thoughts and experiences are just as valid as everybody else's even if it is the minority opinion. S/He wasn't trying to be argumentative at all.

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