Death, Abuse and Alcohol - pg.2 | allnurses

Death, Abuse and Alcohol - page 3

As 2013 draws to a close all over the world we need to stop and think about what this night means to many families, friends and the Emergency Room. Many of us are planning a night of celebration,... Read More

  1. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    #13 2
    There is such a big hype about shops selling cannabis in Colorado, yet you can buy alcohol anywhere and it causes so many problems. I just cannot imagine how much devastation alcohol has caused world wide, lives ruined, money spend on care.

    The cost has to be phenomenal, I hazard a guess that the cost is much higher than we know! yet as you say it is socially acceptable
  2. Visit  NightNurseRN13 profile page
    #14 0
    I was a nursing student driving down a dark highway on my way to clinical when I ran over a man laying in the middle of the road. Long story short, he was driving home after a night of partying, fell asleep and crossed over the median into the oncoming traffic lane. He got out of his car and was then struck by a vehicle which sent him flying 50 feet. Not sure of the order of things anymore, but after that two more cars were involved in the wreck and I ran over him.

    I was lucky that I didn't strike another car. In fact I don't know how it's even possible that I didn't. The other cars not so fortunate, but no other lives were lost. Broken bones and rattled nerves could have been much worse.

    That man was only 23 years old, he didn't make it.
  3. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    #15 3
    .....and people think one is "odd/strange" or some kind of "thinking you are better than me" or puritan for not indulging.

    If you are a non-drinker who is not in recovery, just actively choose not to drink, have you ever noticed how uncomfortable it makes others? How one is seen as "less fun"?

    It is amazing how that works. Someone comes into a facility because they are chronic painers looking for a fix is "draining" and "horrible". Someone looking for fluids for their hangover--ahem, I mean flu-- and "poor thing"......

    Alcohol is just as addicting and just as mind altering as the next thing. People get addicted quickly, sometimes without warning, and it is damaging.

    None of this is a character defect, it is an addiction. Which is a disease process. But we, as nurses, can get caught up in the "Mom who went out to the party" and the "homeless person who is drinking mouthwash" cycle. All indulgences, that create an addictive process or not, need to been seen in the exact same way. That is where the disconnect is, in my opinion.
  4. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    #16 1
    Quote from NightNurseRN13
    I was a nursing student driving down a dark highway on my way to clinical when I ran over a man laying in the middle of the road. Long story short, he was driving home after a night of partying, fell asleep and crossed over the median into the oncoming traffic lane. He got out of his car and was then struck by a vehicle which sent him flying 50 feet. Not sure of the order of things anymore, but after that two more cars were involved in the wreck and I ran over him.

    I was lucky that I didn't strike another car. In fact I don't know how it's even possible that I didn't. The other cars not so fortunate, but no other lives were lost. Broken bones and rattled nerves could have been much worse.



    That man was only 23 years old, he didn't make it.
    That must have been so traumatic for you! How many families and lives were affected by this mans decision firstly to drink, then to drive!

    His family must have been devastated
    You will live with this trauma for life and the other drivers
  5. Visit  NightNurseRN13 profile page
    #17 1
    Quote from madwife2002
    That must have been so traumatic for you! How many families and lives were affected by this mans decision firstly to drink, then to drive!

    His family must have been devastated
    You will live with this trauma for life and the other drivers
    To this day I have anxiety attacks when driving on dark roads. Flashbacks of seeing him in the middle of the road right before my car went over him.

    Thankful that it wasn't as bad as it could been, but what a selfish act to get into a car and put not only your life in danger but the lives of others.

    I'm okay with people drinking, but they need to be responsible.
  6. Visit  Irish_Mist profile page
    #18 2
    Quote from jadelpn
    If you are a non-drinker who is not in recovery, just actively choose not to drink, have you ever noticed how uncomfortable it makes others? How one is seen as "less fun".
    Ugh! I deal with this all the time. I drink very rarely and when I do, I do not get drunk. It is just a personal preference I have for various personal reasons. I have a friend (ironically, an RN. I am not an RN yet.) who badgers me to death to drink to the point of drunkenness. "I want to see Irish_Mist get DRUNNNNKKKKK tonight". So annoying. You would think this girl would know to back off given her education and exposure to drunk people working in the ER. I can have just as much fun sober as someone can being drunk! I think if someone is your friend, they will respect your desire to not drink yourself stupid!
    Last edit by Irish_Mist on Jan 15, '14 : Reason: Typo
  7. Visit  Kidrn911 profile page
    #19 0
    Oh my goodness, I don't drink by choice. Both parents were alcoholics. My father died at a young age of 59 because of it. I have been poorly by coworkers because I won't go to a bar after work. Seriously, is life that bad we must drown our sorrows in self pity? Seriously, why not go for a bite or coffee? No it has to be go out and get drunk. Ugh!!!!
  8. Visit  Jen-Elizabeth profile page
    #20 1
    My parents taught me and my brothers from a young age that if we drank, we should call for a pick-up. My parents were not ignorant to the fact that drinking occurred in high school. I was a good girl was hated the taste of alcohol, but my brothers took advantage a few times. It stuck with them to the point that as adults in their 20s, they never drive to party where they will be drinking; they arrange for a designated driver or cab ride home.

    This plan-ahead decision saves lives.
  9. Visit  LisalaRN99 profile page
    #21 1
    And our President Obama recently remarked that he thought the marijuana wasn't any more dangerous than alcohol! I nearly choked when I read that! Alcohol is pretty darned dangerous Mr. President!
  10. Visit  Soon2BNurse3 profile page
    #22 0
    I don't get it......he said it wasn't more dangerous than alcohol....that's not saying alcohol isn't dangerous... *confused* I agree actually..
  11. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    #23 1
    Alcohol consumption directly led to nearly 80,000 deaths per year in 16 North American and Latin American countries between 2007 and 2009, according to new research.
    A population study of more than 230,000 deaths showed that the countries with the highest mortality rates that were fully related to alcohol consumption were El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua.
    In addition, 86% of the overall deaths occurred in men. In fact, the rate of deaths from alcohol consumption was 28 times higher for men than for women in El Salvador.
    Although the risk for all men in the United States and Canada was only 3 times greater than for women, the risk was higher for those between the ages of 50 and 69 years.
    "The mortality rates found in this study reveal the tip of the iceberg of a broader problem," investigators led by Vilma Pinheiro Gawryszewski, from the Health Analysis and Information Unit at the Pan American Health Organizatio
    New from Medscape this morning
  12. Visit  ZeroNightskye profile page
    #24 1
    I grew up in an Irish/Aboriginal family. Alcohol was, and still is, a part of life. I think teaching responsibility is far superior than the puritan style abstinence I've seen on this thread. My dad read a lot of James Crumley, and always agreed with this quote:

    "Son, never trust a man who doesn't drink because he's probably a self-righteous sort, a man who thinks he knows right from wrong all the time. Some of them are good men, but in the name of goodness, they cause most of the suffering in the world. They're the judges, the meddlers. And, son, never trust a man who drinks but refuses to get drunk. They're usually afraid of something deep down inside, either that they're a coward or a fool or mean and violent. You can't trust a man who's afraid of himself. But sometimes, son, you can trust a man who occasionally kneels before a toilet. The chances are that he is learning something about humility and his natural human foolishness, about how to survive himself. It's damned hard for a man to take himself too seriously when he's heaving his guts into a dirty toilet bowl."

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