Dear preceptor - page 5

by Ivanna_Nurse

59,059 Unique Views | 175 Comments

Dear preceptor.. I came to you smiling, full of energy and ready to tackle the last leg of my orientation journey, with your guidance of course. I haven't really gotten any inclination on where that guidance is at. You tell me... Read More


  1. 1
    Gee, Ivanna, I would say we had the same preceptor but my school canned mine while she was precepting me. She pulled a lot of what you went through and more. Fortunately my instructors were more than able to see there was something "not right" having had me in clinicals and classes for two years. I am one of the few people inmy school's history who had a preceptor pulled out from under them. I ended up with a really nice woman who took the time to actually teach me what I needed to know about the real world with tact and good sense.
    You are out from under it now and have your whole career ahead of you. I lived through, we all have. Now we just have to learn to be the very best nurses we can and know that all people are different and be emphatic enough to understand them and help.
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  2. 1
    Oh no... Fortunately I had an wonderful precepter, for the most part. My "main" one was awesome, but sometimes acted as charge and worked on a different wing than I was going to, so I had everyone and their mother precepting me. Some people felt bad for me, but although it was a little inconsistent, I took it as a positive thing and took all the different nursing styles to make my own.

    I'm sorry you had to deal with this tired and negative person. Everyone has a bad day, but it seems your whole orienting experience was overall not a good one. Some people just shouldn't be in nursing, ESPECIALLY precepting. You know that saying "nurses eat their young"? That is so true sometimes. I had a nurse make me CRY one time. I didn't let her know it....but still! Ugh! Be yourself and don't let anyone let you down ok?

    Happy Thanksgiving!
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  3. 1
    Tabitha: [Quite] "I am one nurse in America who is looking for answers and would love to generate a thoughtful discussion to that end. There are pockets of us who are willing to stand up and fight;" Your post was amazing. I wonder how we can promote this end to the "lateral violence" we experience. Who do you suggest we fight against? I believe that there really has to be a lower nurse/pt ratio, and that corporate decisions for "productivity" are to blame for the amount of work that nurses have to do. There really is no such thing as charting by exception. So many things are done to prevent liability. We are professionals and yet are are treated as employees (lackeys) and are dictated to by...lawyers?...efficiency experts?...resource managers?. A thinking RN is not really wanted in many operations; a tech seems to be preferred. As far as your experience with the burned out nurse who was going to call the house sup, I would say we need to try and maintain professional speech. Good manners are not for when everything is fine; manners are for when everything is messed up! Doctors seem to have some kind of training in speaking well of everyone, as do members of Congress, even when they are calling each other jerks! It would be nice if we as nurses could develop this respect towards each other and then demand or command respect as professionals who can do x amount of high quality work and then state what is the natural limit of what we can do and that we need additional professionals to deliver the quality of care that is necessary. There is no nurse shortage---there is a staffing shortage. This is the source of burn out.
    oldiebutgoodie likes this.
  4. 1
    Thank you for alerting those of us who precept how our actions can look from the other side. I am truly glad for the reminder and hope my students and preceptees have a better experience than you did. I really hope your situation has improved.
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from goodneighbor
    Tabitha: [Quite] "I am one nurse in America who is looking for answers and would love to generate a thoughtful discussion to that end. There are pockets of us who are willing to stand up and fight;" Your post was amazing. I wonder how we can promote this end to the "lateral violence" we experience. Who do you suggest we fight against? I believe that there really has to be a lower nurse/pt ratio, and that corporate decisions for "productivity" are to blame for the amount of work that nurses have to do. There really is no such thing as charting by exception. So many things are done to prevent liability. We are professionals and yet are are treated as employees (lackeys) and are dictated to by...lawyers?...efficiency experts?...resource managers?. A thinking RN is not really wanted in many operations; a tech seems to be preferred. As far as your experience with the burned out nurse who was going to call the house sup, I would say we need to try and maintain professional speech. Good manners are not for when everything is fine; manners are for when everything is messed up! Doctors seem to have some kind of training in speaking well of everyone, as do members of Congress, even when they are calling each other jerks! It would be nice if we as nurses could develop this respect towards each other and then demand or command respect as professionals who can do x amount of high quality work and then state what is the natural limit of what we can do and that we need additional professionals to deliver the quality of care that is necessary. There is no nurse shortage---there is a staffing shortage. This is the source of burn out.
    Hi Goodneighbor!

    Ii have added this topic to the Nursing Advocacy/Activism/Politics forum. Check it out and join in the discussion. I'd be very interested in hearing your thoughts. I agree that we do not have a shortage of nurses and that the problem is that hospitals aren't hiring (i.e. working short)! Please head over to my other discussion at: http://allnurses.com/nursing-activis...ss-439599.html

    You are very insightful!

    Keep thinking for yourself, it's our only hope.

    Tabitha
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  6. 1
    UGH.... this type of thing gets me so mad. There is no reason that a fellow nurse should treat another nurse as she has treated you. I am sorry for her attitude. What I have learned working with such people as you have described is that for the most part they lack self confidence and knowledge. They put you down to build themselves up. How sad is that? I just don't get why nurses treat each other like that.
    I am glad you are through with this preceptor and never be mean to a new grad or nursing student or someone you will precept.
    Take care and good luck.
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  7. 0
    What I am really good at is assessing the patient, listening to them, interpreting the S&S they describe and putting it into "doctorese" so they can obtain apropriate treatment. I am also a good caregiver in that I can make someone feel better with a footbath while they talk, for instance: things that make up the magic of nursing, in short. I like to research their disease and find nursing interventions that address the discomfort they are having. This is good for chronic diseases as well as acute. Once I had care of a person who had Gastroparesis, among other things. This person started spewing Tube feed out of his mouth.The LVN who came on gave him an injection of Ondansetron. However I had managed the problem before by checking the residual (350ml!) and turning off the pump as necessary to tolerate the feed, assessing for constipation, etc, and recommending a lower rate, or just actually informing the DR of the findings. The LVN was "more efficient" according to the powers that be, and was a more desirable employee as the LVN finished the paperwork and task faster, problem solved. This is a terrible risk for aspiration, and misery. It kind of demonstrates the value of an RN. How many times have we seen a DR who says "Oh, you have nausea, take this..." when the problem is something like aversion to pureed chicken, as an example. This type of nursing takes time and thought but pushing meds seems to be the priority all too often. I don't know what this has to do with activism exactly but I think I am talking about the kind of slapdash nursing that is in vogue now in some places. I suspect Florence did a lot with just observation and caring. I wish we had the gift of time.
  8. 1
    What a great post! I wonder what would she say if she got to read this? Maybe you could share with the nurse manager? No one should be treated this way.... Thanks for sharing your experience!
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  9. 1
    i cannot figure out why some nurses are like this. did they forget that we all started new and required learning to be where we are today. Oh thats right, she was born "super nurse" wasnt she?
    Ivanna_Nurse likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from tanyakeppler
    What a great post! I wonder what would she say if she got to read this? Maybe you could share with the nurse manager? No one should be treated this way.... Thanks for sharing your experience!
    I think the floor would open and swallow me.... lol. However... the look on her face would be priceless. ~Ivanna:spin:


Top