CYA and documentation-where?

  1. I've been reading posts about documenting incidentswhen you're having problems with co-workers, techs, doctors, etc. (I'm referring to documention that's not patient related.) My question is, where do you do this? Do you just keep your own little notebook and write stuff down? Would this type of documentation actually hold up in court? Or does it need to be officially filed with HR? I'm a bit confused. Thanks.
    •  
  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   barbyann
    I use a web-based email to document all my CYA's. I email myself the information and save it. I figure it is then timed, dated, stamped and can be used in court if necessary, in the future. Open an email account strictly for this purpose only, document at work on the employers time and using their computer. Once in a while backup to CD for safety.
  4. by   TemperStripe
    Ok, now it makes more sense. And using email does seem like a good idea, as opposed to presenting hundreds of wrinkled, torn notebook pages.
  5. by   RN BSN 2009
    Stupid question - What does CYA stand for ?
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from iceyspots
    Stupid question - What does CYA stand for ?

    "CYA" = "Cover Your Ass"...or as my professor stated diplomatically "Cover Your Assessments".
  7. by   RN BSN 2009
    Aha! Thanks....... I guess it wasn't apparent to me LOL
  8. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    For minor things, I would say any emails you send to HR or your manager concerning a work related problem/issue ALWAYS cc: yourself. That way you get a copy back with a date/time stamp, it shows that your manager was notified, and your manager can see that you are keeping records. I've done this all through school, especially when emailing assignments in. It actually saved my friend from failing a clinical b/c the instructor insisted the student never tried to contact her about a preceptor that wasn't working out. The student produced all the emails proving the instructor was sent them, and that was the end of it....she was very lucky. Always CYA!

    At the beginning of nursing school we had a lawyer who represents nurses against the BON come to speak to us, and wow what a presentation. She told us about all the stupid things nurses do and don't do to cover their butts. She said if its a serious incident, keep a copy of any important documentation from your side everything that was said and done, put it in an envelope and mail it to yourself. When you get it back, write on the outside of the envelope exactly what the incident was, and when it was. Then put it in a box for safekeeping so the right letter can be opened when needed. The envelope has the date stamp from the postoffice, and if ever needed in a court case, should only be opened by your lawyer. And, if it is a significant incident, keep a file with a sheet of dates of all phone calls & letters, and keep paper & digital copies of everything.

    Another big thing she said NEVER to do, was if you get a call telling you u are under investigation for something, do NOT call the BON to explain yourself. She said everything you say will be written down/recorded and can come back to haunt you later if you say something you shouldn't have. She said many nurses have lost their licences trying to explain their way out of something, rather than seeking legal counsel....
    Last edit by S.T.A.C.E.Y on Dec 17, '06
  9. by   bargainhound
    your notes in notebook of some sort would also be accepted
  10. by   RN BSN 2009
    Quote from S.T.A.C.E.Y
    For minor things, I would say any emails you send to HR or your manager concerning a work related problem/issue ALWAYS cc: yourself. That way you get a copy back with a date/time stamp, it shows that your manager was notified, and your manager can see that you are keeping records. I've done this all through school, especially when emailing assignments in. It actually saved my friend from failing a clinical b/c the instructor insisted the student never tried to contact her about a preceptor that wasn't working out. The student produced all the emails proving the instructor was sent them, and that was the end of it....she was very lucky. Always CYA!

    At the beginning of nursing school we had a lawyer who represents nurses against the BON come to speak to us, and wow what a presentation. She told us about all the stupid things nurses do and don't do to cover their butts. She said if its a serious incident, keep a copy of any important documentation from your side everything that was said and done, put it in an envelope and mail it to yourself. When you get it back, write on the outside of the envelope exactly what the incident was, and when it was. Then put it in a box for safekeeping so the right letter can be opened when needed. The envelope has the date stamp from the postoffice, and if ever needed in a court case, should only be opened by your lawyer. And, if it is a significant incident, keep a file with a sheet of dates of all phone calls & letters, and keep paper & digital copies of everything.

    Another big thing she said NEVER to do, was if you get a call telling you u are under investigation for something, do NOT call the BON to explain yourself. She said everything you say will be written down/recorded and can come back to haunt you later if you say something you shouldn't have. She said many nurses have lost their licences trying to explain their way out of something, rather than seeking legal counsel....
    Wow, is the BON hawks going around trying to pull licenses or what!
  11. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Quote from iceyspots
    Wow, is the BON hawks going around trying to pull licenses or what!
    Well the Lawyer that came to talk to us was pretty old and had been in the business for numerous years so all her big warnings were from cases over the past 25-30 years. Since many of us plan to move to other areas to work, she was also sharing experiences her co-workers had with other BONs as well.

    Regardless, its something to think about, and hopefully never have to use. Alot of stuff from her talk though really made us think.

    One big thing we were told to remember is that the BON (College of Nurses, as it is called here) is not just to regulate the practice of nurses, but to protect the PUBLIC from nurses who should not be practicing....not the other way around.

close