Cruise SHip RN?

  1. 0 Does anyone know anything about being a nurse on a cruise ship? The Pay? The Hours? The Living? Is it really not as great as I think it might be? What kind of patients would we see, what procedures do we do, stuff like that.nbch:
  2. Visit  skinc1 profile page

    About skinc1

    From 'Dallas, Tx'; Joined Feb '08; Posts: 14; Likes: 1.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    Speaking as a passenger - on my last cruise (2004), one of the crewman fell 40 feet and broke his femur, a passenger drowned and they had someone have an MI!

    I think it would be too cool to be a cruise RN - my experience is 10 years in a level one trauma center and I'm also an advanced practice nurse. I'm waiting to see some more posts too.
  4. Visit  core0 profile page
    0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Speaking as a passenger - on my last cruise (2004), one of the crewman fell 40 feet and broke his femur, a passenger drowned and they had someone have an MI!

    I think it would be too cool to be a cruise RN - my experience is 10 years in a level one trauma center and I'm also an advanced practice nurse. I'm waiting to see some more posts too.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    http://www.nursezone.com/nursing-new...s.aspx?ID=8834

    http://include.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.d...=2002207150324

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...e_nursing.html

    And just for trauma here's a job for a cruise NP:
    http://www.carnival.com/CMS/Fun_Jobs...ecruiting.aspx

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  5. Visit  ERnewbieRN profile page
    0
    I've always been interested in this... I'm looking forward to see some responses!
  6. Visit  zenman profile page
    1
    I talked with a cruise nurse once and she took off like a streak of lightening from the ship every chance she got....just to get some quiet.

    And don't forget what an infectious disease doc told me one time, "I'd never go on a cruise because that ship is one big toilet!"
    pnut8377 likes this.
  7. Visit  Jeffthenurse profile page
    1
    I've been on 7 cruises, always had a good time. I spoke to the nurses on one of them----medical office is only open certain times everyday, they don't take health insurance, and they are pretty much on call most of the time. They do get some days off and can go shopping in some ports but generally have to be available in case of emergencies. They generally work 6-8 months at a time and then get two months off and work on a yearly contract system. You have to get used to the sea and get your "sea legs" and you can't be seasick when the passengers are! They're counting on you to help them! You have to be ready for ANYTHING....births, major injuries, trauma, MI's, burns, etc. They said nurses on cruise ships are treated well by the staff, respected as officers as though they were part of the captain's staff, generally get along well and work very closely with the ship's physician (if not you don't stay), and also don't work long in cruising....it's hard work, most miss their families and leave after 1-2 years. They said it was a great experience for them and most likely would return into ER or ICU nursing after their cruising ended. It's now opening up for male nurses.....for years most cruise lines would only hire female nurses but that's changing. If you have ER, ICU, or Occupational nursing experience and your significant other wouldn't mind you leaving for months at a time, it might be a great experience for you.
    SilentfadesRPA likes this.
  8. Visit  Ginger's Mom profile page
    0
    I am a frequent cruiser. I have only used the infirmary once. The nurses where all from the UK. The infirmary was like a mini Er. The nurses told me they have to cover 24 hours a day when a passenger needs to be hospitalized. ( I was on a transatlantic cruise and didn't see land for over a week). They seemed happy and like cruising. The infirmary is usually in a very lower deck.


    The nurses also provide occupational health to the thousand or so workers onboard.
  9. Visit  Freedom42 profile page
    0
    No comments to offer, just info the OP might find interesting: Here's a link to the CDC's monitoring program for cruise ships.
  10. Visit  Nauticlinda profile page
    0
    Being a nurse on a cruise ship is good and I have noticed that nurses that do it tend to stay for a number of years. However, being a nurse on a large private yacht does have better working conditions and is more rewarding. Although the jobs that come up on yachts are few they do come up.
  11. Visit  CuriousMe profile page
    0
    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    I am a frequent cruiser. I have only used the infirmary once. The nurses where all from the UK. The infirmary was like a mini Er. The nurses told me they have to cover 24 hours a day when a passenger needs to be hospitalized. ( I was on a transatlantic cruise and didn't see land for over a week). They seemed happy and like cruising. The infirmary is usually in a very lower deck.


    The nurses also provide occupational health to the thousand or so workers onboard.
    Not just occupational health, but the medical team is primary care for the crew members....as they live there 6 to 8 months at a time as well....and even small ships have more like 3,000 crew members. There's often a separate entrance/waiting room in the infirmary for the crew.

    I lived and worked on a cruise ship in another role and was usually good friends with the medical team.

    My understanding is that for small to mid-size cruise ships, there's generally one Doc and three nurses (bigger ships had 2 Docs and 4 nurses). There's a rotation of one day staffing the infirmary/being oncall during the day, then the next day being oncall overnight, then a full day off. 1-2 codes per month are not unusual....but it wasn't unheard of to have more than that a week.
  12. Visit  nursejilly2005 profile page
    0
    I have applied to a few different cruise lines and one cruise line agency. I am a travel nurse currently and have been interested in cruise ship nursing since I took my first cruise vacation 5 years ago. I am married and would have to leave my hubby and the doggies at home So I would miss them horribly but want to have this experience. Does anyone know if family can come and stay with you on the cruise (not the entire time but just to visit) ?
  13. Visit  linearthinker profile page
    3
    No nurses, but my husband has a good friend who is a physician that works on cruise ships. He took the job b/c his wife got the house in the divorce and it seemed like an easy way to not have to buy a new house right away. He took a position with a transatlantic luxury liner named after a Monarch. It has turned him into a real misanthrope. He hates it: hates his job, hates the passengers. He says it is the worst job he has ever had and cannot wait for his contract to be up. Mostly drunks, and if you thought the average clinic/hospital patient was entitled, cruise ship passengers are apparently 100x worse.
    icuRNmaggie, neemo, and elprup like this.
  14. Visit  CuriousMe profile page
    0
    Quote from nursejilly2005
    I have applied to a few different cruise lines and one cruise line agency. I am a travel nurse currently and have been interested in cruise ship nursing since I took my first cruise vacation 5 years ago. I am married and would have to leave my hubby and the doggies at home So I would miss them horribly but want to have this experience. Does anyone know if family can come and stay with you on the cruise (not the entire time but just to visit) ?

    Generally family can cruise for a very discounted rate (like $30/week) on a space available basis.....but no, they generally can't just live with you onboard.


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