Creepy!!!!!!! - page 2

I had a male patient tonight whom I have taken care of for 2 nights now. He continuously says very lude remarks, and when I was bent over administering an IV med he started rubbing my back, telling... Read More

  1. by   jevans
    I certainly agree with all the above advice!

    I would also complete an incident report [ i seem to continuely say this] In the UK an incidnet report is used for ANY occurence out of the norm even sexual harrassment


    Many years ago as a newby was constantly harrassed One particular guy grabbed me one too many times but of course apologising each time.

    I picked up his water jug and accidently tipped it over him, in a loud voice I said

    " Sorry I fell over your slippers"

    1.5L doesn't half make a mess

    j:kiss
  2. by   dianah
    researchrabbit, YES, YES, the MOM voice! I jokingly threaten some pts w/it (those who "get it," and who are OK w/a light-hearted approach) if they get outta line.
  3. by   Dr. Kate
    Agree with all of the above. You don't have to put up with it. And patients acting out need to be told they are behaving inappropriately, that you do not have to tolerate his behavior just as if he or a doc was yelling at you. Politely tell him you'll return to finish his care when he can behave.
    And be sure to let your manager and supervisor know this has happened, even if it was only once.
  4. by   psychonurse
    I have it really easy at the place that I work...if my patients make advances towards me and NO doesn't work, then we write them up and most of the time they go to Segregation and it usually cools thier jets. If that doesn't stop it, we have security have a little talk with them..and if that doesn't stop him they send them to another prison... But if you get them in Segregation for enough time, that usually puts a stop to their advances. :chuckle
  5. by   JailRN
    I'm SO glad I work in a jail. (Plus, I'm old) But when I was young< I wouldn't put up with that nonsense!! Like others have said'Hostile work environment" Sexual harrassment" these buzz words make employers lawyers cringe!! Document, document, document. and keep taking it higher. If all else fails, call in sick!!
  6. by   fergus51
    Forget tact!!! I had one patient pull this type of crap and told him it was inappropriate and if he couldn't control himself I would get him another nurse. That was about a week before I got a job in OB and left all those freaks behind.
  7. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas


    Speak softly and carry a 4 iron
    FORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




    doo wah ditty
  8. by   Stargazer
    Lots of great advice here--I have nothing to add. I wanted to ask everyone a question, though--how many of you have been the subject of inappropriate remarks (or behavior) from patient's visitors and how did you handle it?

    I used to get this all the time in ICU: visitor (male OR female)would nudge (male) patient and say, "Well, at least you got yourself a cute nurse!" or "You sure got a purty one today, hyuk hyuk hyuk!" I was honestly stumped whenever this happened and could never muster a response other than a weak, pained smile. My coworkers and I used to discuss it--we all felt it was degrading and completely belittled our education and skills, not to mention undermining the professional relationship--but they never had a good response either.

    What do YOU do?
  9. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    Im thinking a 14 guage IV at the base of his thumb for sure , a possible rectal tube and a 22 foley without the nice ky jelly. I would inform the supervisor of the advances and also request a different assignment, and if" Sparky" kept it up , well I would have to call the House supervisor if things didnt change. Remember keep yourself covered this person can easily say it was you that was advancing , and trust they will look at you before they will look at him, because after all he is "sick".
    Zoe
  10. by   JEA616
    OB is not always a guarantee of avoiding creeps like that. It is amazing how many Dads (husbands,boyfriends "fiancees") would pull crap like that. Some would even do it right in the labor rooms. Guess they figuired their wives were to distracted giving birth to notice.
  11. by   RNConnieF
    What about the honest, blunt approach? " Your attentions are unwelcome and make me uncomfortable. Sexual advances are unacceptable in a professional relationship." I was actually "caught" saying this to a patient by my clinical instructor my last semester. She had me do a peer teaching-learning demonstration, she liked it so much. I don't mean to offend, but some of the responses sound like the old "female, passive" voice. What is wrong with stating, with force, EXACTLY what is acceptable behavior. If a male was the foucs of unwelcome advances he would not hesitate to make sure his message to back off was received. I hope no one takes offence. I guess you can tell I got an "A" in the "Assertiveness" class.
  12. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    ...........I wanted to ask everyone a question, though--how many of you have been the subject of inappropriate remarks (or behavior) from patient's visitors and how did you handle it? What do YOU do?

    A situation like this happened to me my first year as a nurse. I was caring for an elderly woman who was comatose the entire time she was in our care, and her one son (who looked to be in his late forties or early fifties) would flirt with me every time he came to visit his sick mother.
    I would NOT respond to his flirts.....which angered him......so he
    went to the nurses station, and asked to speak to the Nurse Manager. He told her he did not want me taking care of his comatose mother because I didn't spend enough time with her....that I just rushed in her room and out again. Of course, after telling the NM what had been going on with that dirty minded man, she had a talk with HIM. :chuckle Needless to say......I continued to care for his mother and his advances stopped because the NM had told him he would be removed by security if he ever tried anything with any of her staff...and he would NOT be allowed to be in his mother's room as long as staff was present to care for her. He got so he would rush out of his seat and exit the room when staff had to enter the room to care for his mother. His mother died a week later witout ever regaining consciousness. What a creep that guy was!
  13. by   pebbles
    Originally posted by RNConnieF
    What about the honest, blunt approach? " Your attentions are unwelcome and make me uncomfortable. Sexual advances are unacceptable in a professional relationship." I was actually "caught" saying this to a patient by my clinical instructor my last semester. She had me do a peer teaching-learning demonstration, she liked it so much. I don't mean to offend, but some of the responses sound like the old "female, passive" voice. What is wrong with stating, with force, EXACTLY what is acceptable behavior. If a male was the foucs of unwelcome advances he would not hesitate to make sure his message to back off was received. I hope no one takes offence. I guess you can tell I got an "A" in the "Assertiveness" class.
    Agreed, Connie!
    I think you'd be hard pressed to find a nurse who has NOT had some form of sexual harrassment at work....
    I have experienced this several times, and used the approach you describe... in fact, this is how I was taught in school, and my managers have reinforced this concept of professional barriers and appropriate behaviour. The unit manager will even talk to the family herself if it continues to be a problem. It's nice to be backed up in this way, but that doesn't mean it isn't upsetting.

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