CPAP: Use It And Live - page 3

i work in a cardiac intensive care unit; ccu and sicu together. as an icu nurse, i'm well acquainted with the correlation between untreated sleep apnea and heart disease, stroke or sudden death. ... Read More

  1. Visit  blueheaven profile page
    0
    Quote from oramar
    I have question for nurses that use them. Did it force you to move of your bedroom because it is noisy and keep your spouse awake?
    We always play a rainshower CD, so any noise made by our (yes our) machines or masks is a non issue
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  3. Visit  dcinma profile page
    0
    I have had two of these things and could never use them. The first one was prescribed about 13 or 14 years ago, when I was still married. I was able to wear it for a few weeks and I did get better sleep with it for a while, but then it became so irritating to me that I was tearing it off when asleep and then later it just kept me up all night if I tried to use it.

    Later my doc ordered a different one, with a gel mask and some kind of humidifier attached to it. I think I used it once or twice and that was enough for me. I think there are pieces of it in one of my closets.

    I sleep alone nowadays although my daughter says that I snore sometimes (I'm a divorced dad who has sole custody). I don't believe her :-). I do know that if I sleep on my back it's not unusual to wake up gasping.

    What to do? I don't know. I'm reluctant to mention it to my PCP; he'll order another (3rd!) sleep study and probably a CPAP that I can't tolerate. Back in the first go around the whole thing started because of muscular issues; the PCP sent me to a rheumatologist who felt that it was fibromyalgia and that sleep disturbances go along with that; the sleep specialist/neurologist said I had sleep apnea. Then we had a 3 way battle between the docs...the neurologist wanted me to have surgery in my throat for it; the rheum and the PCP strongly disagreed and wanted me to use meds and a CPAP. I gave up on all of it and just deal. If they could find another way to treat the apnea I'd be interested but the CPAP was completely unacceptable and I couldn't sleep at all with that thing on my nose and the air forced in.
  4. Visit  SCSTxRN profile page
    0
    You might talk to your doctor about a chin strap alone - sometimes in PACU we pushed up on the lower chin to raise O2 sats.
  5. Visit  blueheaven profile page
    1
    Please, please, try to find something that will work for you. Do some web surfing-the web site that another poster mentioned is excellent.

    I have always snored, even when I weighed 120lbs. Of course I don't weigh that now but still! A few years ago, I started noticing that I was having difficulty with my memory (not good when you work ICU). When I would wake up in the mornings and every muscle in my body would ache as well as having severe headaches.

    Anyway, had a sleep study and found out there was good reason for my difficulties. My oxygenation would drop at times to the 60s. We intubate people with better sats than that! Even now, I have nights where I take my mask off but 95% of the time it stays on. It was like turning on a light switch. The muscle pain, morning headaches, hypertension, decreased vision went away. I can tell that the hypoxia fried off a few brain cells but overall my memory is better.

    Do I like wearing it? Heck no. For me it beats the alternative. Keep trying! Find a system that will work for you. There are other systems besides the nasal and full face mask. Good luck!
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  6. Visit  CNA2day profile page
    0
    I have a question. My fater has sleep apena and states that he can not wear the cpap because it "collapses his sinuses" and he can not breathe.
    He did recently undergo surgery to fix a deviated septum, but states he still can not wear the cpap.

    Is this something that actually happens or is he being belligerent? (he has a history of that!)

    Also what are some other options to help people with sleep apnea? Are there alternative therapies? Any information would be great!
  7. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    Quote from cna2day
    i have a question. my fater has sleep apena and states that he can not wear the cpap because it "collapses his sinuses" and he can not breathe.
    he did recently undergo surgery to fix a deviated septum, but states he still can not wear the cpap.

    is this something that actually happens or is he being belligerent? (he has a history of that!)

    also what are some other options to help people with sleep apnea? are there alternative therapies? any information would be great!
    actually cpap forces open the airway so you can breathe. the first few times you put it on, however, it seems as though it's a lot of work to breathe because you have to exhale against the pressure.

    if you're looking for good information, try http://cpaptalk.com. the wonderful folks there helped me through my first few months of cpap and i'm sure they can help you or your father, too.
    RetRN77 likes this.
  8. Visit  bradleau profile page
    0
    I had problems with my nasal allergy, which clogged my nose. Using a CPAP just was not working. Finally I was put on a decongestant, and singular. Other than having a cold, my nose stays open and I can use the CPAP. Sometimes just using a full face mask will do the job. But for me I really had a hard time learning to breath out against the pressure of my machine...which was set at 12. It took me nearly 3 months of being hard headed ....I WAS NOT GOING TO FAIL AT USING MY CPAP. I use it faithfully. I have had about 4 machines in the 20 yrs I have had apnea. My husband is now on one. His is set at 17. He did not have any problems getting used to it. He no longer falls asleep behind the wheel or at work. So I would think that your issue with your father? not using the CPAP may only be that he has not been fitted with the proper mask and his nasal congestion has not been addressed. Let him know he will be much happier and have more energy, sleep better, too.
  9. Visit  RetRN77 profile page
    0
    My husband has Central Sleep Apnea and he is pretty good about using his CPAP, but he has allergies as well, and when he has difficulty he doesn't use it. He also refuses to travel with it. He tells me his therapists told him that as long as he uses it 5 or 6 hours a night that is good. I never know what to think of that. I'm glad he uses it as much as he does, but my dad died of OSA right after being diagnosed and before being put on treatment, so I'm always afraid. I try not to think about it as he is stubborn as a mule and my talking about it never changes anything. Thanks for your article - I will email it to him. :redpinkhe
  10. Visit  riverwink profile page
    1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Just like the American Express card ad: Don't leave home without it, my CPAP travels where ever I go, including AN headquarters.
    The machine is the size of a large tissue box, found Profile lite gel masks work best and saved my life past 16 years .
    Only time not worn is during power outage--- then I'm praying for the electric company's quick fix.
    My husband and I each wear a CPAP. We invested in a small generator. Runs the refrigerator and our CPAPs. Considered the small travel models with built in batteries but decided we may not have them charged when we need them.
    RetRN77 likes this.
  11. Visit  NCRN2010 profile page
    0
    Love this post. I too wear a CPAP. I hate it. It took me several weeks to get used to the idea of having to wear it. I have tried numerous masks trying to find the right fit and one that doesnt give me pressure ulcers all over my face. Sometimes I do fall asleep without it on, and I can really tell the difference. I am a strong advocate for my patients and CPAP usage. I work in an ambulatory care setting and everytime I see sleep apnea listed as a diagnosis, I open a dialogue about it with the patient. I dont know if it makes a difference for them, but I would like to think that it does. Also, alot of doctors are not on the bandwagon with CPAP. I see patients all the time, obese, diabetic, hypertensive, etc, etc..complaining of depression, fatigue, headaches...the first thought in my head is sleep apnea? I have suggested this a few times to different docs, but have learned to treed lightly with some docs. They dont appreciate nurse's knowledge.
  12. Visit  RetRN77 profile page
    1
    Quote from bradleau
    I had problems with my nasal allergy, which clogged my nose. Using a CPAP just was not working. Finally I was put on a decongestant, and singular. Other than having a cold, my nose stays open and I can use the CPAP. Sometimes just using a full face mask will do the job. But for me I really had a hard time learning to breath out against the pressure of my machine...which was set at 12. It took me nearly 3 months of being hard headed ....I WAS NOT GOING TO FAIL AT USING MY CPAP. I use it faithfully. I have had about 4 machines in the 20 yrs I have had apnea. My husband is now on one. His is set at 17. He did not have any problems getting used to it. He no longer falls asleep behind the wheel or at work. So I would think that your issue with your father? not using the CPAP may only be that he has not been fitted with the proper mask and his nasal congestion has not been addressed. Let him know he will be much happier and have more energy, sleep better, too.
    Since my last post, I, too, have been dx with sleep apnea, and I thank this post for being a motivating factor to keep at it.

    Is your CPAP still set at a constant 12? That is a lot of pressure for the expiratory phase. I really applaud you for being so persistent. I have an Auto machine now (gives variable pressure in response to needs) which also has expiratory phase relief - I have that set at 3 because of my asthma.

    I really agree with you that the right mask is crucial. I use the Swift FX Bella - nasal pillows with ear loops, and they are great for me. I can sleep on my side without a mask issue, and it doesn't muss my hair nor require me to be able to reach all around my head to adjust straps - which I'm unable to do due to arthritis. I love it. Well, as much as one can love something hanging off her face in the middle of the night.

    Many thanks again to the OP!
    Twinmom06 likes this.
  13. Visit  Twinmom06 profile page
    1
    I was diagnosed with OSA 2 years ago and the Bi-PAP saved my sanity...I never realized how much better I could feel!
    RetRN77 likes this.
  14. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    2
    Quote from riverwink
    My husband and I each wear a CPAP. We invested in a small generator. Runs the refrigerator and our CPAPs. Considered the small travel models with built in batteries but decided we may not have them charged when we need them.
    Hurricane Sandy challenged my belief that a travel CPAP with a battery was going to be enough. We will be getting a generator as well. As long as it runs the CPAPs and charges my iPad, I'm good!
    teeniebert and NRSKarenRN like this.


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