CONTINUED IN WHAT IS THE MAJOR REASON Why are they all leaving? - page 6

What conditions would cause so many nurses to leave? Our ER has been losing friends fast. Why is there such a large turnover in nursing? I'm going to school, yet I talk to many RN's who are looking... Read More

  1. by   anne74
    Previous Post: "I can say that during my 3 years working as a tech in PACU in Arizona I have never seen a nurse miss out on lunch. They all also find time to use the restroom."

    **************************************

    You can't compare the PACU to typical floor or ED nursing. The PACU is different - the pace includes natural downtimes, so it's a lot easier to eat lunch, go to the bathroom. But the floor is a different story. I used to be in Med/Surg and there were many times I didn't eat, etc. On the floor, you don't have the luxury of taking care of a patient for a few hours and then sending them on their way. In Med/surg, you are constantly at the beck and call of your patients for 12+ hours. And the poor ED nurses - I've never worked there, but I know you guys have to deal with frequent flyer, non-compliant patients that never let up.

    I now work in the PACU, and it's much less stressful. Not that it's stress free, but at least you get a break now and then. It's delightful! If you're burned out from the floor or ED, consider the PACU before quitting nursing all together. It kept me in the profession.

    Hats off to those who can stay in Med/Surg. I don't know how you do it. It killed me - physically and spiritually. Thank you for all your hard work, floor nurses! And ED nurses too!
    Last edit by anne74 on Nov 5, '06
  2. by   DeLana_RN
    Quote from anne74
    Hats off to those who can stay in Med/Surg. I don't know how you do it. It killed me - physically and spiritually. Thank you for all your hard work, floor nurses! And ED nurses too!
    Amen.

    DeLana
  3. by   marybethm
    Hospital nursing, like many labor-intensive jobs, is a young nurse's job in my opinion. And nursing is one career that offers so many opportunities for the different stages in a nurse's life that a person would be a fool not to take advantage of them all. It's the greatest job in the world, I think. I have worked as an float in all dept. of the hospital when I was a student, overseas as a young single nurse, in the ER and CCU for ten years, then part time nights as a young mother. I took a few years off and went back as a school nurse so I have summers and holidays off. I also worked as a camp nurse so I could take my kids for free. It's a great life, but hospital nursing is still the hardest job I've ever had. You can only do it for so long.
  4. by   alien-warrior
    Quote from banditrn
    After all these years, I'd like to have a job where I didn't have to worry about anyone's urine, bm, cardiac, or pulmonary history - plain and simple.
    Know what you mean:uhoh21::uhoh21::uhoh21::uhoh21::uhoh21: and don't forget their bowels!!!!

    And having pander to demanding and ungrateful patients, and relatives, while listening to their abuse and grittng teeth and biting your tongue!!!.
  5. by   Mary Austin
    Ah yes, the million dollar question that employers will find the answer to later when there are not enough of us to do the work on the floors. It will be then and only then they might start to listen (maybe)

    A Nurse spends 8-12 hours per shift attending to patients When you have co-workers who sleep on the job, take extra long breaks, and then do not cover your lights when you go on break then who does the patient direct their anger towards? and how do you explain that you needed a break and another nurse was suppose to answer your call lights for you? Patients are self-focused and they care about getting the help they need now. Patients do not understand that you are one person caring for six or seven patients by yourself. They do not realize that you may walk three to six miles per shift. Many older patients see the nurse as their handmaiden and she/he is there to follow the doctors orders. The general population has a very interesting view of nurses and it has not changed for the most part. I interviewed people who were not tied to the medical profession (the average patient) and they would tell me that nurses follow doctor's orders and that the doctor is the boss! I see and hear how patients praise doctors up and down for their work when they come into see the patient. I have been a nurse 27 years on Med Surg units in various hospitals and nothing has changed in the general public's mind on what nurses do and are suppose to do.


    For me, I am looking for a way out and off of the med surg floor. I am watching RN's that are 4 years into their job and want to get out because the job is "killing" them. They cite their reasons as "not enough help", "demanding patients and families", "no breaks", "arguements and disrespect from doctors", "lifting heavier patients kills my back," etc. Hospitals, Nursing homes, doctor offices are working short staffed and work ethics have changed. This profession is in trouble. The baby boomers are aging and are dropping out of the workforce. There are not enough people to fill their job positions and nursing is one of them. There are nearly 77 million baby boomers. Wait until they all need medical care in the next 10-20 years.

    The nursing profession is going to be in for a very rough ride when the boomers leave the nursing profession which they are currently doing. I have some years left and will go back for that Master's degree so I can get away from floor nursing. So why are nurses leaving? Multiple reasons but the bottom line is that PROFIT comes before people in ALL medical professions. Thus the reason the doctor's office nurse has been replaced by the medical assistant. (I recently spoke with a MA who was doing complex dressing changes in an office with no experience in wound care and no, the doctor did not show her how to do it she just did it!.) If it goes on behind closed doors and no one knows then what is the difference. The general public does not know who treats them except it was that "nice nurse" at the doctors office who did it. MA's cost less to hire than an experienced nurse. Interesting to note that a number of doctors at our facility think that nurses make too much money! These doctors are usually older and established surgeons who have made their millions already. Bottom line......MONEY
  6. by   futurecnm
    Wow, what a discussion. Sometimes these type of posts discourage me as a nursing student but I'm going to keep at it because I truly feel like I'm meant to be a nurse. I am a student doing clinicals on a med-surg floor. The nurses are required to take breaks and lunch. For the most part, they seem happy with their job. this is my first exposure to hospital nursing so I don't have a lot to base my opinion on. Maybe it depends where you live, because here it seems like job satisfaction is pretty good.
  7. by   jabiru
    Quote from Mary Austin
    The nursing profession is going to be in for a very rough ride when the boomers leave the nursing profession which they are currently doing.
    This is so very true. I don't know what's happening where you are but in Australia, there is very much a head-in-the-sand approach to the looming nurse shortage. They can't go on importing nurses forever and not enough new nurses are being trained to replace those who retire. Almost half the nurses in this country are aged 45+ (me included) and it's predicted that 100,000 nurses will retire in the next 15 to 20 years. Nowhere near that number are being trained.

    I guess they'll do what they always do and wait until the drama unfolds and then say, "but no one told me".
  8. by   nurscee
    I went to RN nursing school at 50yrs of age. (I'm 54)
    At this time I'm a Telephone triage nurse and love, love, love it!
    I was a CNA 33 yrs ago at a large hospital.
    I naively thought things were the same.
    Not!
    Gone were the orderlies who used to help us lift.
    Now it is a very lucky day if you have a CNA at all to help.
    Heck, you're lucky if you just barely have enough nurses!
    I couldn't believe all the insane charting that now has to be done to CYA!
    Long long hours.
    I loved the patients.
    Shame things have changed so much.
  9. by   alien-warrior
    Quote from jabiru
    This is so very true. I don't know what's happening where you are but in Australia, there is very much a head-in-the-sand approach to the looming nurse shortage. They can't go on importing nurses forever and not enough new nurses are being trained to replace those who retire. Almost half the nurses in this country are aged 45+ (me included) and it's predicted that 100,000 nurses will retire in the next 15 to 20 years. Nowhere near that number are being trained.

    I guess they'll do what they always do and wait until the drama unfolds and then say, "but no one told me".
    I trained at my local university, last March, 240 students passed their nurse training at that same university, there were just 20 jobs available. Rumour has it that next year, the student nurse intake will be reduced from 2 a year, to 1 a year.
    'spose me and mine will just have to move to Australia.
  10. by   jabiru
    Quote from alien-warrior
    I trained at my local university, last March, 240 students passed their nurse training at that same university, there were just 20 jobs available. Rumour has it that next year, the student nurse intake will be reduced from 2 a year, to 1 a year.
    'spose me and mine will just have to move to Australia.
    Give it a shot, if you really think you'd like it. I know nothing about how the immigration rules might apply to you but nurses are really in short supply here.
  11. by   RunningWithScissors
    Someone else touched on the answer to why we are leaving the profession.

    Five little letters: JCAHO.

    This organization has made life a living hell for nurses. The ridiculous mandates in documentation wastes more time than it is worth.

    Every year there's a new mandate; pain control, safety, etc....along with new hoops to jump through.

    They mean well, but they have no idea how their idealogic nonsense impacts real patient care. ("Show me that the pain med you gave was effective in 1 hour." It wasn't. This patient will NEVER be pain free and we will NEVER make them happy!!!!!! Is there a care pathway for FF PIA?)
  12. by   RunningWithScissors
    BTW, I most always take a lunch break; it may not be 30 min, but I do make sure I eat, even if it's already 3:30 pm and I've been at work for over 8 hours with 4 more to go.

    I just hand my beeper to the charge nurse and say "I'm going to eat".
  13. by   kmrmom42
    READ BELOW..........This may cause even MORE nurses to consider leaving the profession, myself included..............

    Nurses Stunned by Criminal Charges

    Madison, WI -- The nursing community is stunned by the Department of Justice (DOJ) decision to pursue criminal charges against a nurse who caused an unintentional medical error.

    Upon hearing the news of the July medication error that took place in
    a Madison area hospital and resulted in the death of a patient, Wisconsin nurses responded with an extreme sense of sadness and empathy for the patient's family. Nurses' thoughts and prayers continue to go out to the family.

    The decision of the DOJ to charge a health care professional with
    criminal charges sets a precedent in Wisconsin and may have broad ramifications nationwide on how safety concerns are addressed within the health care industry. An outcome may be the exodus of health care professionals leaving their career or deterrence of individuals entering the
    profession, knowing that any medication error or patient injury could
    result in prison time as a felon.

    The Wisconsin Nurses Association (WNA) opposes the DOJ decision to
    pursue criminal prosecution for unintentional medical errors. The Association
    believes that existing regulatory agencies that include the Department of Health and Family Services and Department of Regulation and Licensing can appropriately address and apply necessary sanctions and monitoring systems to promote quality of care and patient safety. In egregious cases action by the DOJ may be warranted, but this is not the case when an unintentional medical error occurs.

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