CONTINUED IN WHAT IS THE MAJOR REASON Why are they all leaving? - page 5

What conditions would cause so many nurses to leave? Our ER has been losing friends fast. Why is there such a large turnover in nursing? I'm going to school, yet I talk to many RN's who are looking... Read More

  1. by   walktheline
    Just curious, can you use a patient's bathoom for a bathroom break if you ae on your way in there to check on them, or is that considered bad "nurse etiquette"/prohibitted?
  2. by   mickeypat
    My answer to the OP's question would be this.... it could be because of the stress and lack of respect from the company you work for, from the public and co-workers.... Who needs to be treated like a piece of dirt or who wants to be treated like that..... NOT ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    We have to look out for our own sanity and well being!
  3. by   mamason
    Quote from walktheline
    Just curious, can you use a patient's bathoom for a bathroom break if you ae on your way in there to check on them, or is that considered bad "nurse etiquette"/prohibitted?
    No...and you really wouldn't want to use the pt's bathroom. That whole idea is yucky to me. I would also consider it unprofessional.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from sriblanc
    What conditions would cause so many nurses to leave? Our ER has been losing friends fast. Why is there such a large turnover in nursing? I'm going to school, yet I talk to many RN's who are looking for a new career!!
    Nursing can be a back-biting profession. While we do work with unbearable managers, are overworked and unappreciated, it may be easier to deal with if we supported each other. I am a new LPN (but not new to my hospital), and many days I walk in afraid. The same nurses I worked side by side with as a patient care associate are ones that I see are the worst to teach me skills as a new nurse. They sometimes set each other up, tell on each other, don't assist other nurses and they 'eat their young'.

    Unfortunately, it is not the Florence Nightingale image that is protrayed in school and television, and this is the turn off and rude awakening that many nurses walk into. This is one of the reasons that I, personally, will never become an RN...in spite of the money they make, I see their problems to be even scarier than mine because there are too many live wires that cannot be controlled, but a charge nurse has to explain.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Mulan
    No comparison! If you have not worked on a medsurg floor as an RN then you do NOT know what we are talking about, and you are in no position to offer advice.
    I have to agree with others, I think that this person was offering helpful advice. You do need time to leak in the toilet and even if it is just a few minutes to have a sandwich is not unreasonable. I worked in med-surg as an LPN so, I do know that it is extremely demanding, and we cannot control WHEN we can actually do these things, but (or even if it can be done every day), I tried to make time to go to the bathroom as well as make sure that I ate, even if it was for 5 minutes of uninterrupted time. I believe that she meant that we need to take a moment to breathe under the stress.
    Last edit by pagandeva2000 on Nov 5, '06
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Epona
    Just to touch on a few things the last person commented on...

    Take a bathroom break. I know this many sound tough, but YOU HAVE TO TAKE CARE of YOURSELF TOO. Unless it's a life or death situation, I am sure the patient can wait a few moments while you use the restroom. Same for eating, you should take at least a 15 min. break to sit and eat a sandwich. You are no good to your patient and fellow staff members when you are tying your legs and about to fall over from low blood sugar. That helps no one. YOU HAVE TO TAKE A FEW MOMENTS FOR YOURSELF. I have read on this board where nurses take care of everyone else BUT themselves. Yes we are in this to help people, but we have to remember to help ourselves too! You just have to make the time. Period. If the other staff members give you a bunch of junk over taking a 5 min. bathroom break or 15 to wolf a sandwich... get out. I am sure there are other places to work where employees are valued. It may be a challenege in the nursing industry, but I am sure decent places do exist. Stand up for yourself. I will. I have read that is one of the traits of nurses.. that many don't stand up for themselves. In the end you have to NURSE yourself too.

    Good luck and hold your head high.. because YOU are worth it.

    Thanks to all the nurses!!! E


    I want to take the time to thank you for your message, and sorry that it was challenged. It is true, we need a moment to breathe, and in many cases, in the midst of chaos, we tend to forget that if we ignore Maslow's theory for ourselves, there is no way to care for those that cannot care for themselves.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Epona
    No.. I am not an RN YET. Will be starting school in Jan. and I look forward to it. I do not work in a hospital, BUT do work in a TV newsroom where I am the "brains" of the operation and run the newsroom. All the stories that get on air.. I make happen. All feeds, live shots, stories, VOSOT's etc. Yes.. I do not deal with sick or dying people directly, BUT I do deal with people shouting over the phone that their holding on for one more day then going to slit their wrists (had that today and was trying to calm her down over the phone as she was sobbing uncontrollably)... or a mother crying on the phone that her child has been abducted... and yes.. I get calls from family members screaming over the phone line that their house is burning down. I can hear the Moms shouting at the kids to get out... get out!! So nope.. I am not a nurse, but do deal with what you could classify as emergencies on a daily basis. Do I take hour breaks.. No.. do I take half hour breaks.. No.. but I do take 10 min. breaks to go to the bathroom and call to tell my folks I love them... do the Producers get ticked... yes.. too bad.. they get over it. I HAVE to use the bathroom. I HAVE to eat. So no, I am not a nurse yet, but will be one someday. And I was complimenting nurses, saying they should try and take BASIC care of themselves while on shifts... no one is saying yack on the telly for a half hour or take smoke breaks every hour. Going to the bathroom and eating a meal are basic every day bodily events and it does not take being or not being a nurse to know that. If you don't take one, you are only hurting youself.

    Also.. I have heard nursing in hospitals can be rough.. why not look around then. There are plenty of nursing opportunities in the field of nursing. Hope you find your niche and your happiness!! E
    There are many careers that are filled with chaos, and yours sounds like one of them. Thanks for thinking of us!
  8. by   Racin_Rick
    Hi, I departed this site almost 4 years ago under the user name Glad2behere, and this is a wonderful site. I will be leaving nursing again soon, my second departure. I am 52 yeats old, and it is really quite easy to explain why. Where else could I find the wonderful employment to work a Christmas evening and many weekends with staggered shifts, awesome responsibilities, vague legal guidlines, disease exposure of the nth degree, pathetic insurance, physically demanding, emotionally draining pseudoprofession that has become nothing but a temporary nesting job until something better is found that promotes some quality of life. I have worked my job 4 years in critcal care CCU, and have seen for a hired staff of 50 turn over 4 times. Yes, I am very senior now, Level II RN, (could be Level III easily if I wanted to play the goofy games to be one), do housesupervisor in a 478 bed trauma center prn, and could probably be the nurse manager of my unit if I cared about it. Reading truckdriver ads in the newspaper for a salary $15K> somewhat dissimenates the urge for the glory of a NM position. It's simple, the job doesn't pay enough for the exertion. What is really infuriating is the doublework of charting. Physicians don't really do it, bricklayers don't chart every brick they lay, architects write their thoughts when using CAD, plumbers don't say "applied plastic cement to x joint exactly 8 cm beneath expected concrete slab". Overall, having been in business, seen other industries, nursing is the most wasteful of available talent that has created a monster watchdog in charting that has become so important that it totally destroys the mission of nursing. Those of us who attempt to prioritize the patient as first do so at the risk of professional jeopardy in the charting arena. We are all guilty of getting slammed, not being able to chart until it's time to clock out or two hours later, then humans we are, the relevancy of it really rings and we succumb to drawing from memory tainted subjective comments that mean nothing. So there, wasn't that easy?
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Racin_Rick
    Hi, I departed this site almost 4 years ago under the user name Glad2behere, and this is a wonderful site. I will be leaving nursing again soon, my second departure. I am 52 yeats old, and it is really quite easy to explain why. Where else could I find the wonderful employment to work a Christmas evening and many weekends with staggered shifts, awesome responsibilities, vague legal guidlines, disease exposure of the nth degree, pathetic insurance, physically demanding, emotionally draining pseudoprofession that has become nothing but a temporary nesting job until something better is found that promotes some quality of life. I have worked my job 4 years in critcal care CCU, and have seen for a hired staff of 50 turn over 4 times. Yes, I am very senior now, Level II RN, (could be Level III easily if I wanted to play the goofy games to be one), do housesupervisor in a 478 bed trauma center prn, and could probably be the nurse manager of my unit if I cared about it. Reading truckdriver ads in the newspaper for a salary $15K> somewhat dissimenates the urge for the glory of a NM position. It's simple, the job doesn't pay enough for the exertion. What is really infuriating is the doublework of charting. Physicians don't really do it, bricklayers don't chart every brick they lay, architects write their thoughts when using CAD, plumbers don't say "applied plastic cement to x joint exactly 8 cm beneath expected concrete slab". Overall, having been in business, seen other industries, nursing is the most wasteful of available talent that has created a monster watchdog in charting that has become so important that it totally destroys the mission of nursing. Those of us who attempt to prioritize the patient as first do so at the risk of professional jeopardy in the charting arena. We are all guilty of getting slammed, not being able to chart until it's time to clock out or two hours later, then humans we are, the relevancy of it really rings and we succumb to drawing from memory tainted subjective comments that mean nothing. So there, wasn't that easy?
    I can understand what you are saying. Charting is repetitive, redundant, and seems dumb to me. Where did the days go where nursing was really nursing, and they welcomed newcomers into the fold more easily than now? I am a new LPN and am working in a clinic at a hospital that paid my way to go through school. At first, I wanted to work in med-surg, and they did have me work there for about two months when I first started as a formality, but after all that I saw on the floors, I was so happy when I had to go back to my clinic. While it is still busy, it was safer than what I saw, and my heart went out to the patients as well as the nurses there. But, at this point, I don't care if I ever get any more floor experience. It was a nightmare.
  10. by   Sandi0302
    Quote from pjsleepy
    I can tell you why I am looking to leave ER nursing:

    *Gross misuse of the emergency room by the general population for problems that are no where close to being classified as an emergency situation because: a.) they either have no doctor or b.) they know that they must be treated by us and that they don't have to pay
    * Primary care doctors that refuse to attempt to practice medicine for non-emergent symptoms and instead say "go to the ER"
    * Rude patients and family members who:
    a.) are so egocentric that they can't recognize that the person who is blue and barely breathing is going to be seen before your hang nail you have had for 30 minutes
    b.) yell and scream at you, call you every naughty name in the book, name drop supposed "big-wigs" of the hospital (who supposedly exist but I wouldn't know any of them because I've never seen one make it down to my ER to check out the working conditions), and threaten lawsuits, etc.

    I've been a nurse for 6 years. Just in what seems to me to be a short amount of time, I feel like the work load in the ER has tripled. We used to have some downtimes. After midnight was usually a cake walk with maybe 1-2 pts a piece. Now I come in and the lobby is packed from the time I get there until the time I leave. I got tired of hospital politics and started traveling a little over 2 years ago. It was better for awhile, now I only see it getting worse (and I'm a glass is half full kind of girl!) I hate that we have to hold patients in the ER because the floor is not ready. Nothing against the floors---I know they are dealing with their own problems. I bow down to the med-surg nurses because you do a job I could never do. There are just no easy answers. Hospital administrators only see $$$$ as the bottom line when suggestions are made about hospital improvements. And adding to my fury is JCAHO- an organization whose heart (I'd like to think) is in the right place, but it's recommendations and guidlines are so out of touch with reality that a hospita's JCAHO accreditation means zero in my book. I think one doctor I worked with said it best---"They are just making it impossible to do our jobs." Sorry to vent so long. It's part letting off frustration and part mourning a emergency medical system I used to love....
    Amen. I worked in a Level 1 Trauma center ER for four yrs (Not as a nurse, but as a tech), and EVERYTHING you said is true. I think we all had a love/hate relationship with it...loved the challenge, different things everyday, but high burn-out rate. One time this guy was complaining about how long it was taking for his wife to get her TOE xrayed. "Sorry sir, there are 7...yes 7 trauma pts on the other side right now, so it's gonna be awhile"
    Personally, I think we should have Nurses Tell It Like It Is Day during nurses week..."Hey buddy...@#$% &%$!"
  11. by   Racin_Rick
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I can understand what you are saying. Charting is repetitive, redundant, and seems dumb to me. Where did the days go where nursing was really nursing, and they welcomed newcomers into the fold more easily than now? I am a new LPN and am working in a clinic at a hospital that paid my way to go through school. At first, I wanted to work in med-surg, and they did have me work there for about two months when I first started as a formality, but after all that I saw on the floors, I was so happy when I had to go back to my clinic. While it is still busy, it was safer than what I saw, and my heart went out to the patients as well as the nurses there. But, at this point, I don't care if I ever get any more floor experience. It was a nightmare.
    I'm happy for you, congratulations! I guess I am so bored with nursing really, perhaps clinic nursing will shield you from the cynical immersion. Having steady hours is a really good feature. You Go!
  12. by   aberrn
    Where I work at the moment,nurses are leaving from the ER in droves.

    Management accepts resignations without batting an eye.No one is asked what can we do to make you stay?.

    I am personally not interested in listening to management personel who may have RN after their name but have no bedside experience outside of school.

    People who sit behind a desk 9-5 M-F also have no business telling us weekend Baylor people how to do our jobs..I know how to do my job,get me what I need to do it without walking all over to find supplies.

    Docs who get involved in the NURSING process are doing us no favours.You get your docs to see pt's in a timely fashion,we'll take care of the nursing side.

    Plus the usual suspects,ER's filled with non sick,non compliant pt's
    Verbal abuse,no back up from management."No staff,sorry,you'll just have to deal with it".."

    But that being said.the little old lady who grabs your hand and says "Thankyou" after relieving her bad CHF make it all worthwhile.
  13. by   DeLana_RN
    Quote from walktheline
    Just curious, can you use a patient's bathoom for a bathroom break if you ae on your way in there to check on them, or is that considered bad "nurse etiquette"/prohibitted?
    When I worked med-surg/PCU as a new grad with impossible ratios (1:8 on day shift!) I did this all the time; I can use the BR very quickly - you don't have to actually sit on it! - but use it I would. And I also always made it a point to take my 30 min lunch break - off the floor, pager given to a coworker who would later give me hers - because otherwise I would have never made it through a 12-hour shift.

    Never mind that it was never a 12-hour shift - on a good day, I would finish my charting after only 13-14 hours (total of course), on a bad day 15-17 (!) hours . But what are you gonna do as a new grad, basically thrown to the wolves, with 12 pts to chart on?! Yes, up to 12. 8 beds, 4 discharges, 4 admits :angryfire *

    I had to get out of there and went to outpatient dialysis; however, it's a different kind of grinder, and what made that job so hard was (1) horrible early morning hours, (2) UAPs with bad attitudes, probably because many are doing tasks that only nurses should do such as accessing central lines and giving meds, and (3) similar to hospital nursing, impossibly high ratios and expectations.

    So where do I go from here? Well, unlike many, I do have the calling... so I'm not about to leave nursing, and I'm even going back to the hospital! But this time to inpatient dialysis with the incredible nurse/pt ratio of 1:1! It sounds like the best of both worlds... I'll let you know how it goes

    DeLana

    P.S. I've been in nursing long enough now ('98 grad) that I won't hesitate to leave a bad situation - fast.

    * I forgot to add that I made <$14/hr - this was Florida in 98-99. And yes, I did get a talk with the manager - but only because she cared; actually, she was wonderful and the best manager I ever had. She tried, but couldn't change the system in this for-profit hospital (even some very experienced nurses worked lots of OT). She also tried to help me get an internal transfer to the cath lab, but my dialysis job came up first. And she resigned herself soon after that - and went to outpatient...
    Last edit by DeLana_RN on Nov 5, '06

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