CONTINUED IN WHAT IS THE MAJOR REASON Why are they all leaving? - page 17

What conditions would cause so many nurses to leave? Our ER has been losing friends fast. Why is there such a large turnover in nursing? I'm going to school, yet I talk to many RN's who are looking... Read More

  1. by   Macrhys
    I agree with Mulan, you do not have the necessary knowledge or background to make an educated comment. The news media have never had a realistic take on anything, and I am unhappy about your fictional scenario. Please do not make inaccurate comparisons, unless you are a real RN please do not make up situations or comment.
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from UKRNinUSA
    Your words got me thinking. I just wonder how long it would have taken for women to get the vote, if the suffragettes hadn't said to themselves "enough is enough, I'm not going to take this any more" , stopped wallowing in their "powerlessness" and fought, and changed the system. The odds were against them, but they achieved it none the less. If you are not part of the solution, you are just enabling the situation to continue. Just a thought.
    That's an interesting comparison, actually, and there's a lot of lessons for nursing in all of this.

    As it turns out, the women's suffrage movement didn't gain much traction until "radical" members of the national organization complained that they weren't doing enough and broke off to form their own independent group. These radicals took to the streets and screamed bloody murder until they got the right to vote.

    If you notice, the same thing is happening today. The ANA has not gotten much done with ratio laws or, anything else for that matter. This is why the "radicals" in California, CNA, broke off from the ANA in 1992.

    These "radicals" in California are also the only ones who've gotten a ratio law passed in this country ... probably because they broke off from the ANA so they could get things done.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 23, '06
  3. by   Barb101
    Hello Hillflower
    I take heart in what you say should you choose nursing as a calling you will be a great nurse why because you care. I allways wanted to be a nurse from when I was a little girl I used to play the nurse in Drs & nurses but 2 children & marriage altered my ideals and dreams. However with a failed marriage & now working as a nurse I can now see a future. Sure its not all a bed of roses but I have been a people person all my life & this profession gives me the oportunity to interact uplift the weak in body & soul which really recharges me to continue against all the evil within the hospital system which seems opressive & is at times. I always go back to why I started nursing in the 1st place when I feel down its because I want to give my best so that my pts get to again live, love & resume a life for their loved ones & themselves. My greatest satifaction is to see pt who heal so well they leave hospital early & with a smile. Smiles are infectious by the way!:chuckle
    One uplifting moment early in my career is when I was nursing a miiddle aged man who was a challenge to other nurses but for me he would comply with what ever I asked him to do. What did I do reflecting back on this incidient I can really remember but I do know I spent time with him just talking and I was busy on that day too as I had an arrest. Hey from quite ordinary time to hell within a shift but still leaving my calling that day with my heart full as I knew I gave it my all but gee I was tired!
    Again to all the nurses who care & treat this profession as a calling on our finial breath St Pete will give us all pedicures, facials & pedicures & we really will know where we are HEAVEN.
  4. by   tntech1
    Quote from Mulan
    No comparison! If you have not worked on a medsurg floor as an RN then you do NOT know what we are talking about, and you are in no position to offer advice.
    As an outsider looking in, you need to do something that has you less up tight. Everyone has something stressful to deal with, and begining a RN does not make yours special. Someone can be sympathetic to your issues. No, I am not a nurse if that's your next question, but I do have common sense. Everyone knows nurses have a very difficult job, but this is the career you have chosen. The person you are upset with is not on this post. You might need to apologize
  5. by   fd5151
    Quote from Mulan
    No comparison! If you have not worked on a medsurg floor as an RN then you do NOT know what we are talking about, and you are in no position to offer advice.
    I am a medsurg student, working my 3rd year on the clinical floor and found totally agree with you. The newsroom is no comparison, sorry. Go ahead, use the bathroom, so that when EMS comes to medivac your patient out and you haven't finished initiating a new iv site site because he pulled out and the discharge sheet isn't completed, you're going to give the spiel about the bathroom break? I just had a day on the floor i felt good about because i had to get all these things done without getting the break that i would have liked to have but that is just the reality of med/surg floor and giving other coworkers or consultants spiels about bathroom break rights just isn't realistic when things are crazy. I think you are missing that it isn't that nurses don't know how to take care of themselves it is quite simply that the reality of the med/surg means deadlines that can't be compromised and that can arise unexpectedly and that simply have to be done now, not 5 minutes later, but now. And if you can't deal with that then sure, try looking in another field. Once you actually do get up there, you will understand. I heard alot of students proclaim various self-righteous statements before hitting the floor, about the exisiting nursing staff, the work conditions, etc. Once you are actually doing their job, wearing their shoes, then you can talk. It never looks good (or is very much appreciated when you try to tell people who probably have alot of insight into why they do what they do) that they need to change. Especially without any experience yourself. It usually doesn't go over well
  6. by   hope3456
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Yes you are, and yes you will.

    We were all once eager and excited about our new careers in nursing. There is a reason for the so-called shortage. Nurses are leaving because conditions are intolerable.Believe me, thousands of nurses have been doing their best and have been trying to make the best of impossible situations everywhere.

    Saying that nursing is "what you make it" is a meaningless statement.

    You haven't been there so you can't understand where we are coming from. One day, you will.


    I like the way you think, HELLLO nurse. I worked as a CNA b/f and during nursing school. The best thing that came of it was i became aware of the *crap* involved - and better know what to expect from management/ the system now that I am a RN. I better know how to navigate it (the system) and nothing shocks me. Sometimes I wonder where I would be if I hadn't had that previous 'conditioning.' If only I could do things over........
  7. by   fd5151
    Quote from tntech1
    As an outsider looking in, you need to do something that has you less up tight. Everyone has something stressful to deal with, and begining a RN does not make yours special. Someone can be sympathetic to your issues. No, I am not a nurse if that's your next question, but I do have common sense. Everyone knows nurses have a very difficult job, but this is the career you have chosen. The person you are upset with is not on this post. You might need to apologize
    Sorry but the not being an RN does make a big difference. I would have none that without you saying so when you said she needs to do something that has her less uptight!
    She isn't uptight, she is frustrated that until you actually work the floor you can't begin to understand how difficult it is. I have worked many different jobs, most of them did have a high level of stress but nursing is entirely different because of the heatlh issues and you can't understand the true complexity of that until you actually feel the weight of that responsibility.
  8. by   Dixielee
    The upside about being so busy that you can't take a bathroom break, is that you probably have not consumed any liquid either, so you are less likely to need to go. Of course when you notice your urine is bright orange, you might want to look at your intake!
  9. by   fd5151
    Quote from Dixielee
    The upside about being so busy that you can't take a bathroom break, is that you probably have not consumed any liquid either, so you are less likely to need to go. Of course when you notice your urine is bright orange, you might want to look at your intake!
    Not to mention that when adrenalin kicks in the last thing your body is thinking about is digestion and excretion. Now that you mentioned it, i didn't feel the need to stop during my crazy day!:smilecoffeecup:
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Epona
    No.. I am not an RN YET. Will be starting school in Jan. and I look forward to it. I do not work in a hospital, BUT do work in a TV newsroom where I am the "brains" of the operation and run the newsroom. All the stories that get on air.. I make happen. All feeds, live shots, stories, VOSOT's etc. Yes.. I do not deal with sick or dying people directly, BUT I do deal with people shouting over the phone that their holding on for one more day then going to slit their wrists (had that today and was trying to calm her down over the phone as she was sobbing uncontrollably)... or a mother crying on the phone that her child has been abducted... and yes.. I get calls from family members screaming over the phone line that their house is burning down. I can hear the Moms shouting at the kids to get out... get out!! So nope.. I am not a nurse, but do deal with what you could classify as emergencies on a daily basis.
    No, actually, you don't.

    Sorry but, I worked in the news business for nearly 15 years. There's no way you can make the same comparison.

    I'm not an RN either but, I'm getting ready to graduate and I've externed enough to know you're totally comparing apples to oranges. I think that's why so many RN's here have taken offense to what you said.

    What you fail to understand, and what you will learn is ... even if you do the job very well ... a patient can still die on you. And it's totally your responsibility in nursing.

    It's NOT your responsibility if someone dies when you're in the news business. You're not the police, you're not the paramedics. You're still just reporting on what's happening. You're not going to lose your license and you're not going to get sued if someone dies when you're in the news business.

    The key stress in nursing, IMHO, is that the same drugs that we give to make patients well can also cause tons of problems ... whether it's insulin, BP meds ... whatever. You can totally follow doctor's orders to the letter but, that patient can easily bottom out with hypoglycemia, low blood pressure or whatever because the meds work too well ... the desired effect goes to the other extreme and if you're not watching the patients carefully, really bad things can happen.

    And when that happens, it's totally on you. Nobody else.

    On top of that, it's much more difficult to watch these patients carefully when RN's are dealing with totally unrealistic patient loads. So no ... sometimes you can't take a break or go to the bathroom. That, unfortunately, is a fact of life sometimes.

    I'm not saying I'm an expert but, I know better than to say it's the same thing as being in the news business. The comparison, quite frankly, is totally absurd.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 23, '06
  11. by   steve0123
    I'm 24, and have been nursing since I was 17 (straight after I left high school). I worked as a nursing assistant through my uni degree, and have been a registered ("professional") nurse for a bit over three years. In my seven year nursing career, I've worked my up the ladder in a variety of clinical areas, and am now at a stage where I can call myself a specialist critical care nurse and earn a lot of money doing that. The thing is, I decided to leave nursing too (I'm doing a law degree, because we all know that society needs more lawyers than nurses).

    I'm not leaving because of the money or conditions (I have the potential in my current position to nett about $1500 to $2000 a week, and taking my contracted entitlements such as breaks etc has never been an issue, I just take them).

    I'm leaving because I feel the way many of my colleagues do: that for a so-called profession, we don't seem to work as (or be treated as) true professionals. My motivations for entering nursing were fairly honourable: I wanted to help people in a meaningful way, and commerce/business was never an option. But I also had certain career expectations - namely, to be respected by my patient's and allied professions for the work that I do, and to be able to practice my profession with genuine autonomy.

    Society views the medical profession as the experts in healthcare - they diagnose and treat illness, while we help the person through the experience of that illness - and because of that, we are always destined to work under the direction of the medical profession. I can't think of the times I've disagreed with a discharge decision because from my perspective the patient isn't ready, or a treatment regime that serves to prolong life where there is no quality of life, but had no real say because the entire system places the balance of power and authority over such decisions in the hands of the medical profession.

    In short, my reason for leaving is because I want to work in an occupation where my professional opinion is truly valued, and I can provide my services without being undermined by another profession.
  12. by   Simplepleasures
    Hurrah for you steve 0123, if you definatly dont want to stay in nursing, yes please do go into the legal field , what a treasure you could be to employees, especially nurses who have had to deal with unsrupulous administration.My daughter is an employment/ labor lawyer and I am so very proud of the work she has done to advocate for nurses ! As a former nurse you could really do alot of good out there, GOOD LUCK and my Best Wishes in your new endeavor.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Nov 23, '06
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from schooldays
    Amen! Let's allow Epona to speak and not jump down his/her throat!

    I am a student nurse, and I had one clinical instructor who worked straight med-surg many years and she went on and on about this. Yes, you can take breaks. Yes, you can almost always go to lunch. It's about time management and, more importantly, setting boundaries. Now I KNOW you have someone who is assigned to cover you. You have to go to the trouble of giving report and getting report again from them before and after your breaks, but it can be done. If they don't do their job, you have to speak to them about it and then follow the appropriate channels to get them spoken to by someone higher up if they don't cover you properly. That is not easy and won't necessarily make you popular, but it will slowly affect a change on your unit.

    Also, I work as a student RN and I'd say most nurses on the med-surg floor I'm on take lunch every day-an a full 1/2 hour at least. Those who don't are 1) the new grad who is gonna burn herself out fast and just can't seem to get it all done and 2) the woman who cannot delegate and has trouble prioritizing. I'm not at the level of either one of them (!), but from the comfortable position of a student I can see where they are going wrong.
    To me, at least, this is also absurd.

    As a fellow student, I think we need to quit lecturing RN's about the way things are because, quite frankly, we really don't know until we're in their shoes.

    When instructors say things like this, the first thing you have to ask is ... if things were so great then why aren't you still at the bedside? The fact is: they got out for a reason. I've asked my instructors this same question and, most of the time, they've fessed up. Teaching is a much cushier job ... and they know it. They tend to forget what it was like once they get into academia.

    And btw ... when RN's take their lunches when you're externing, part of the reason for that is ... you're externing and helping them with some, if not alot of the work (at least if you're not a total novice.) Ask them if they're taking lunch on days when they don't have any extra help.

    I've been externing in California where ratios and working conditions are better than most places. And it's still very tough. These patients are so sick and the acuities are so high ... try taking lunch when one patient's blood sugar is plummeting, another's BP is dropping like a rock and yet another patient's temp has jumped to 103.

    Meanwhile, management is riding you to discharge this patient and admit another so they can make a few extra bucks. And, even if the other patients are stable some of them are patients from hell who are riding the call lights like crazy and management will write you up for not answering the light in two seconds flat because of their customer service criteria BS.

    I'm sorry but, as a student ... I feel I need to say this: SHUT UP until you're actually doing the job with YOUR LICENSE ON THE LINE.

    Because neither you nor I know what it's really like.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 24, '06

close